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Full text of "73 Magazine (May 1991)"

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MAY 1991 

ISSUE #368 

USA $2.95 

CAN $3.95 



VE Publication 




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international Editio 



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Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Joseph W. Bento N6DGY. N. Chica- 
go IL Do things never change? Or 
should I put it, does the ARRL never 
learn from mistakes? I recently picked 
up a 20-year 73 collection (1960-80) 
and have been enjoying your old edito- 
rials. Old doom and gtoom Wayne ac- 
tually Knows what he is talking about, 
The vast majority of your predictions 
from the "60s are a reality today. You 
said 220, use it or lose it in the 60s 
The ARRL*s incentive licensing scan- 
dal. Thought I'd let you know how right 
you've been all these years. 

ft is fun to read those old editorials. On 
the doom parts f wish I'd been wrong 
.... Wayne 

Marv KB9KYV Several months ago. 
after receiving my Novice license, I 
subscribed to 73. I find it to be quite 
interesting and informative, especially 
your editorials on the slate of the ARRL 
and the ham bands, electric blanket 
nightmares, ihe electromagnetic/can- 
cer connection, microwaved brain 
cells, ad infinitum. I'm feel that I'm get- 
ting a perspective on ham radio that I 
would not get in another pub heat ion. I 
am a computer teacher, and can cer- 
tainly see the value of including radio 
theory in the school curriculum. As for 
project building, I do like to experiment 
when I Tind the time, but keep in mind 
that readers such as myself may not 
have the level of expertise that the 
hams who are writing the articles have. 

Noted, By the way, "time" is a rational- 
ization* You have the time to do what's 
important to you. Its not time, it s prior* 
ities. We alt have the same 168 hours a 
week. . .. Wayne 

Name withheld, ARRL employee M l 
get tired of all the lids complaining on 
packet, SSB. CW. etc . about 'those 
idiots in Newmgton.' If they put half the 
effort into at least writing to their direc- 
tors instead of bitching over the air, 
they'd probabfv be much happier. You 
try to solve problems, the world wilt be 
a better place. Keep up the good work 
and keep on bashing the iazy mem- 
bars." 

W. Richard G. Duane, Jr, WB2VAT, 
Long Valley NJ I was amused by what 
your staff did to Dave's (W5UN) article. 
1 "Two Meter EME Primer'* in the March 
issue On page 52, bottom of column 2, 
the word Vibration" (the oscillation of 
the moon's face as seen from earth) 
was changed to "libation" (drinking) f 

I agree that libratJon effects are 
short-term. However, I do not agree 
(hat libation effects are very short- 
term! I enjoyed the article all the more 
for the laugh it gave me unexpectedly 
in the middle of a very informative and 
interesting piece. 

tf only all our mistakes were so enter- 
taining!. . . Linda KAtUKM 

Walter Lindiey NL7VM After all your 
nagging t have finally upgraded from 
Technician to Advanced. It seems that 
everyone who talks about code claims 
it is either easy or nearly impossible to 
learn. Nonsense; code *s tough to 



From the Hamshack 

learn, but with some practice it will 
come. I think a Godeiess license is 
great because technically-oriented 
people (as opposed to code-oriented 
people) are needed in this hobby. Lei's 
all welcome any new people attracted 
to ham radio through the no-code li- 
cense. 

Malcolm G, Bowen VE6MGB, Ft. Mc- 
Murray, Alberta I just finished readtng 
"Random Output" in the January 1991 
issue, and I would like to shake your 
hand!! I agree with you wholehearted- 
ly. 

In November 1989 I became inter- 
ested in amateur radio. I approached a 
member of the local ham club, and he 
was very helpful. I purchased a used 
FM01 at a garage sale from a ham 
operator and it turned out he became a 
good friend. A month or two later, I 
joined the ham club. I was Informed 
that night classes would be starting 
soon. 

I turned up the first night along with 
12 other people. The second week, on- 
ly 10 turned up; the following week, six 
came, and in the last 10 weeks of the 
1 S-week course, only two of us showed 
up. Myself and the other participant ap- 
preciated both amateur operators 
teaching this course, and expressed 
our thanks. I took my exam and 
passed, the Other person didn't try the 
exam 

Now this is the part that bums me, 
and I have told all the club members 
so'! At a general meeting at ihe end of 
summer, 13 people turned up, and we 
talked about everything. But not one 
word about myself and the other gen- 
tleman sticking out the night courses 
through winter al -25 degrees, or 
even that t had passed my exam. I wail- 
ed until the meeting ended, and there 
was nothing said, and I swore I would 
never attend another club meeting. 
Can you imagine how a new member 
would feel in that kind of atmosphere? I 
thoroughly enjoyed your article and 
found myself agreeing with everything 
you wrote. Thank you for your patience 
and the opportunity to voice my opin- 
ion. 

Thanks for sharing your experience. 
Unfortunately, we've received dozens 
of simitar fetters, I'm glad you told your 
club how you feel Maybe it will help 
(hut l doubt it). 

What struck me most about your let* 
ter was the fact that your licensing 
class took 1 8 weeks. 18 weeks!!!??? 
No wonder you had so many dropouts! 
tf its run correctly, it shouldn't take 
more than 8 weeks (or is there same- 
thing peculiar about the Canadian li- 
cense that requies 1/3 of a year to 
team?) David NlGPH 

Fred Smith K3MOA, York PA After 
following the code vs no-code debate 
for what seems like an eternity, f am 
pleased to see that the FCC finally 
made ihe most logical and rational de- 
cision on the matter. I am one of the 
many unfortunate ones who had to suf- 
fer through learning code to obtain my 
license, but I would not wish that "rite 
of initiation' on my worst enemy. . . . 
Though the FCC has made its deci- 



sion, I expect thai ihe debate will go on 
forever or until the code fanatics die 
off. Max Planck summed it all up when 
he wrote: "A new scientific truth does 
not triumph by convincing its oppo- 
nents and making them see the light, 
but rather because its opponents even- 
lualty die and a new generation grows 
up that is familiar with it," 

I hope that we are able to spawn that 
new generation so that amateur radio 
doesn't die out with the code fanatics 

Nice quote. Max was loo science-ori* 
en fed. The quote hofds water even 
when you take the word "scientific 1 ' 
out of it, . . , Wayne 

Joe Plitnick KA1 WPD. S, Meriden CT 

While attending the 31 st Tropical Ham- 
boree Amateur Radio/Computer Show 
in Miami. Florida, a situation devel- 
oped that I think is quite amusing, 
While visiting your exhibition booth I 
was given a copy of 73 at no charge. I 
really appreciated it and I signed up for 
a subscription. While visiting other dis- 
plays I came up lo . . ./another ham 
magazine,] It was kind of Strange to 
see that they were charging one dollar 
for their current issue, I commented to 
the staff working the display that I re- 
ceived a free copy of 73. The reply was, 
"Well, that's all it's worth.'" Amazing. I 
have since decided to stop purchasing 
this magazine and sister publications, I 
enjoy your whole magazine. Thanks 
again for the free issue. Keep up the 
good work 

Ht> Joe— I remember meeting you in 
Miami This kind of adolescent name- 
calling has been going on for years 
among the major ham magazines. 
Kin da' stupid, isn't it?. . .David 
NlGPH 

EJ, Kidd, 111, WD4ILS, Naples CA 
Over the years, 1 have been a retail 
purchaser and subscriber lo your mag- 
azine. I have never agreed so com* 
pletely with your observations on the 
general wrong- head edness Of many of 
our ham brethren. 

Every leisure activity which can be 
divided into groups seems to suffer 
from periodic infusions of petty authori- 
tarians bent upon enforcing the 
"rules." Small Minds will find a way to 
smite the assembled faithful with the 
Rules, and attempt to convince them 
that some particular loss of individual 
freedoms is Good For Them 

There is a scatological Southemism 
that, to paraphrase it. attributes the de- 
sire to enforce discipline upon smaller 
groups to a void in one's sex life. So, for 
years I have assumed that old men with 
callsigns from the first and second dis- 
tricts, holding ARRL posts and Extra 
tickets, tended to be petty authoritari- 
ans and general noxious busybodies 
because the lack of ultraviolet rays in 
the Northeastern winters attenuated 
their libidos. What a revelation, if your 
hypothesis is correct! Facing Newing* 
ton and genuflecting live times daily 
doesn't make one an old fart: CW 
makes one an old fart! 

Having read much on EMF and can- 
cer, becoming interested due to your 
editorials. I often chastise emergency 
services workers and hams for using 
those cute microphone/rubber duck 
anlenna combinations which they 
gleefully pin and clip to their lapels and 
epaulets. Two meter energy radiated 
8* from one's eyes is probably not a 
great idea; 70cm radiation from an an- 
tenna closer to the brain than the elbow 



can be shown, according to some tests 
in Ihe '60s and '70s, to be hazardous to 
one's eyesight. But what does the 
emission of 800 MHz cellular tele- 
phone signats from all those Nokia and 
Motorola units up right next to the ear 
do for the brain? Can we expect a Yup- 
pie Brain Disorder in the 21st century? 
The current ratio of AgreementyDis- 
agreement between the NSD editorials 
and my own views is running about 
70:30 in the last five years, I find this an 
alarming trend, inasmuch as I celebrat- 
ed my 40th tap around the sun last 
year. Instead of a young, wild-eyed 
Cracker who disagreed with you about 
70% of the time and burned the tires off 
my mobile, i now look like Wilfred Brim- 
ley, find more wisdom in the counsel of 
those with more experience, and am 
trying to cut my own personal depen- 
dence on foreign oil by a few barrels a 
week. Not quite ready for Old Fart- 
hood, I did reregister as an Indepen- 
dent this year. 

It's interesting that your agreement 
factor has risen with wisdom— why, it's 
almost enough to make a person think! 
Perhaps it's time to dig back through 
oid rags and recheck old editorials and 
see how well they've withstood the test 
of lime—vs your take at the time. 
Please advise Wayne 

Michael A. Sciomacco N3HUX. Pitts- 
burgh PA I've been a 73 subscriber for 
a year, and I've gone from nothing to 
General in 13 months, I am using your 
advice about bringing ham radio to my 
students at the Greenway Middle 
School Teacher's Center. This past 
summer I instructed a Novice class 
sponsored by the New Futures extend- 
ed day program, and el me red a new 
Novice, Brian KA3WXH. I am currently 
starting a new Novice/Tech class. I am 
also awaiting the installation of our 
Cushcraft vertical to get on 10 meters. 

During a recent demo at Greenway . I 
had a real life emergency that required 
me to contact 91 1 and a child's parent 
through 2 meter auto patch. A student 
had fallen down a hill and cut her foot 
open on a broken bottle. The students 
were able to view firsthand how I was 
able to lend a hand. 

I also occasionally take check-ins for 
a local swap and shop repeater net. 
This gives me great personal satisfac- 
tion, and I feel all hams should con- 
tribute to our hobby in whatever capac- 
ity that they can, and not look down 
their noses at the young. I.E. "Lids"! 
(We have a local club that screens their 
applicants and will not admit young 
hams. What a crock \\ 

Thanks for your inspiration. I am be- 
coming an M unreasonable" person. 

Ervin L. Sly, Nipomo CA Have been 
reading your editorials for a long, long 
time, and even though I don't always 
agree with everything you say* 1 enjoy 
them. Have always been very envious 
of all the things that you do, out it takes 
money to do it with, I "just ain't never 
had none of that stuff to do all those 
things," and your March editorial final- 
ly told me why. Just don T t have Ihe !.Q* 
form 

I have had Advanced ticket for 51 
years, 1 just retired a few years back, 
and I had to spend what little I made on 
my family, and not extras, like the hob- 
by or traveling. Guess it's too late now 
to get smart I 

I hope the no-code ticket brings in 
lots of new hams. 



2 73 Amateur Radfo Today * May, 1991 



THE TEAM 

PUBUSHER/EDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NS0/1 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
David CassidyNlGPH 



MANAGING EDITOR 
Bill Br own W886LK 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 
Hope Currier 

SENJOR EDITOR 
Linda ReneauKAlUKM 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Joyce Sawteile 

CONSULTING EDITOR 
Mike Nugent WB8GLQ 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
MikeBryceWBSVGE 

0av»dCowhigWA1L8P 
Michael GefefK8iUM 
Jim Gray W1XU/7 
Chuck Houghton WB6IGP 
Arnie Johnson N1 BAC 
Dr Marc Lea veyWA3AJR 
Andy MacAH.ster WA5ZIB 
Joe Moell Ke0V 
Jim Morrissett K6MH 
Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
Carole Pefiry WB2MGP 
Boo Winn W5KNE 

ADVERTISING SALES 
REPRESENTATIVES 

Dan Harper 
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ACCOUNT SERVICES 

Donna DiRusso 

1-603-525-4201 

1-800-225-5083 
FAX (603) 525-4423 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 

William Heydolph 

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR 
Viki Van Valen 

ART DIRECTOR 

Alee ScofieW 

TYPESETTING/PAGINATION 
Linda Drew 
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Sieve sfewen 

GRAPHIC SERVICES 

Dale vWiiams 
Theresa Verville 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHER 
DanCroteau 

■ 

WGE PUBLISHING INC. 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFRCEft 
Tim Pel key 

CIRCULATION COORDINATOR 
Harvey Chandler 

CIRCULATION ASSISTANT 

Janet LaFountaine 

To subscribe: 1-800-289-0308 

Editorial Offices 

WGE Center 

Foresi Road. Hancock NH 03*49 

603*25-4201 , FAX {603} 52M423 

Subscription Services 
1 800-289-0388 

Co forado 'Foreign Subscribers 
call 1-303-147-9330 

Wayne Green Enterprises is a dfvfsion 
of International Data Group, 

Reprints: The firsi copy of an article 
$3,00 (each additional copy-Si .50). 
Write to 73 Amateur Radio Magazine, 
WGE Center, Forest Road, Hancock, 
NH 03449. 



J£ Amateur 



MAY 1991 
Issue #368 



Radio Today 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 



9 The Copperhead Keyer Paddle 
The perfect touch! KI5A2 

1 1 The Handy Inductance Bridge 

For measuring small coils. 

+ * ■ f i m ■•»•* » *;■ * r\fcj*Ti.OL/ 



14 The Mini-Keyer 

A smaller and newer version of an 
old friend. .,,.,. YVB9YBM 

20 Covert Hamming 

A design for your next secret mis- 
sion. K6BRP 

22 Software for the Ham Shack, Part I 
Useful ham calculations you can 
program yourself! , WA4BLC 

26 Two QRP Transmitters 

Dust the ethers and bend the 
waves! . . . . KI5AZ 

30 A Better Tube Tester 

Check more than just DC amplifi- 
cation WA1 IAO 



42 Apartment Antennas: 

A Challenge 

How to cope with a less-than-ideal 

QTH W1GV 



REVIEWS 



34TheJPSNIR-10 

Separate the words from the noise. 

40 The J*Com MagicNotch Audio 
Filter 

A little box that locks out lids. 
. N1GPH 

46 The SR3 Simplex Repeater from 
Brainstorm Engineering 
Versatile store-and-forward voice 
controller ...... , , WA3USG 

Cover design by Alice Scofield 
Cover photo by Larry Dunn 




DEPARTMENTS 



78 Above and Beyond 

72 Ad Index 

70 Ask Kaboom 

52 ATV 

48 Barter "n - Buy 

84 Circuits 

50 Dealer Directory 

50 DX 

17 Feedback Index 

81 Ham Help 

56 Hams with Class 
58 Hamsats 
66 Homing In 

2 Letters 

4 Never Say Die 

62 New Products 
88 Propagation 
68 QRP 

7QRX 
88 Random Output 
64 RTTY Loop 

82 73 International 
80 Special Events 
86 Uncle Wayne's 

Bookshelf 

63 Updates 




No moving parts . see page 9. 



FEEDBACK... 
FEEDBACK! 
It** like being there — 
right here in our offices! 
How? J tisi take advantage 
of our FEEDBACK card 
on page 17, You'll notice 
a feedback number al 
the beginning of each 
article and column. We'd 
like you to rate what you 
read so that we can print 
what types of things you 
tike best. And tfiect we 
will draw one Feedback 
card each month for a 
free subscription to 73 . 





Editorial Offices 

WGH Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone- 603-525-4201 



Ma nuscripts Con tri but ions ■ n the form of manuscripts with drawings and/or photog raphs are welcome 
and will be considered for possible publication We can assume no responsibility for loss or damage to 
any material. Ffease enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope with each submission . Payment for the 
use of any unsolicited material will be made upon publication. A premium will be paid for accepted articles 
that have been submitted electronically (CompuServe ppn 70310,775 or MCI Mail "WGEPUB" orGEnie 
address "MAG 73") or on disk as an IBM-compatible ASCII file. You can also contact us at the 73 BBS al 
(603} 525-4438. 300 or 1 200 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, one stop bi! All contributions should be directed 
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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 3 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Never sa y die 

Wayne Green W2NSD/1 




FCC Screws Up! 

The FCC has tried to kilt an ant with a 
sledgehammer. Actually, though I'm 
dumping on the FCC, it's mainly our 
own fault that this nonsense hap- 
pened . 

By now. unless you've been living in 
a black hole, you know that a ham who 
was protesting our attacking Iraq sent 
a message through a packet system 
asking people at the other end to make 
a 900-nurnber call. Since there's a 
charge for 900 calls, an FCC engineer, 
alerted to this terrible crime, started 
issuing fines right and left, and in gen- 
eral dumping on a number of hams 
whose packel stations relayed the 
message. Talk about overreaction! 

Yes. it was in bad political taste to 
Question President Bush's decision to 
clobber Iraq. And yes, we're not sup- 
posed to use amateur radio to generate 
money for causes. But the crime here 
was more on the order of a yellow-line 
violation than a hanging offense. 
We've been used to hearing worse at- 
tempts at using amateur radio to sell 
things lhan that like those endless 
solicitations for subscriptions to a ham 
magazine (not mine, darn it) via sup- 
posed information bulletins. 

For years we've bragged about how 
great we are at being self-regulating 
and self -policing, Then, whenever an 
Extra Class GW-crazed ham goes 
berserk on the air. the first thing we do 
is go whining to the FCC, demanding 
they put the SOB off the air. Do we do 
anything about It ourselves? You bet 
we d.o1 We sit there, wringing our 
hands and complaining for a while be- 
fore we telephone the FCC. 

The FCC engineers, delighted to find 
an incident where they are on the moral 
high ground for a change, have leaped 
into this mess with an atom bomb to 
pacify a flea. FCC, get the heck off our 
backs and stop being dumb. Yes, we 
know we're not supposed to handle 
messages that involve making money 
for someone. That doesn't mean that 
some ham somewhere isn't going to do 
it. And it doesn't mean that you have to 
close down the hobby /ust because we 
have a few idiots. 

A message going through a packet 
system, no matter how illegal, isn't go* 
ing to do a lot of harm. Let's put this 
baloney into perspective. Most ops 
don't even bother to read the traffic 



being relayed through their stations. 
Like a repeater, they're providing a ser- 
vice. 

So what should we do? Is it time to 
start trying lo write new regulations 
that will allow us to cope with this dire 
emergency? Or is it time to stop being 
silly? I vote for the latter. We need few- 
er regulations and less un needed ha* 
rassment from the FCC 

If we are such wimps that we can't 
handle the creeps who've been screw- 
ing up 20m with unwanted broadcast- 
ing, officious net jamming and pile-ups 
on DX. then we deserve ali the misenes 
we have. Yes. of course the ARRL 
could do something about it. \ happen 
to think they not only should, but that 
it's their responsibility to keep our 
bands clean. And I think itl of you for 
being a member and being too afraid to 
tell them what you think. . and for 
endlessly voting for directors who re- 
fuse to do anything. 

Now tell me how you don't agree with 
everything I write, What part don't you 
agree with? 

When I Grow Up ... ? 

Yes. I know, most of us are in our 60s 
and it's difficult to remember when we 
were kids and we'd wonder what we 
might do when we grew up. But sup- 
pose you get into a position where you 
are going to be a mentor to a young- 
ster—what kind of advice would you 
give? 

It's difficult to took bade from retire* 
ment age and assess what we've done 
with our lives. It can be even more diffi- 
cult when we think about what we 
might have done. 

If you were to be in a position to men- 
tor teenagers, what guidance could 
you give them? Could you point loyour 
own success and the impact you've 
made on the world as an example of 
what's possible for thorn? 

What did you want to be when you 
grew up? Did you make it? Or have you 
gone on way beyond anything you 
imagined? Or have you fallen far short 
of your dreams? 

If you're short, is it too late to try 
again? 

Amateur radio can be the key which 
unlocks a lifetime of excitement and 
growth. When my friend Alfie and I 
were given a box of old radio parts one 
Sunday in church, Alfie had little inter- 
est in the junk, so I took it home. The 



' angel' • who gave that box of old parts 
to two kids that day changed one of 
their lives. 

I joke that one of the great tragedies 
of my life was when the Popular Me- 
chanics radio I built with those parts 
worked. It was a turning point, Perhaps 
this is one reason why I'm so anxious to 
touch as many kids' lives as possible 
with the magic of radio. 

How can a teenager understand 
enough about how life works to set any 
realistic goals? Perhaps, as a mentor, 
we who've been through it can help 
explain about the attractiveness of the 
pitfalls How can we get across the im- 
portance and the fun of learning when 
kids are up Lo here In lousy teachers, 
menacing peers, impossible parents. 
and threats of war and destruction? 

How can we explain in terms they 
can understand thai there are an in- 
finite number of ways in which the 
world will try to head them off? That 
Darwinian survival Of the fittest really 
does work, even on a personal level? 

We have a wide variety of drugs for 
the body and the mind, all geared to- 
ward keeping them from success. 
There's alcohol, which their parents, 
television and the movies try to con- 
vince them is cool. Smoking doesn't 
have quite the cachet it did a few years 
ago, but with the uneducated it's still 
cool. Junk food and overeating are 
pushed at us from every side. 

How about junk food for the mind 
such as ball games (of ail kinds). 95% 
of the television fare, most movies, 
comic books and most newspapers? 
There are a lot of junk books too , ♦ , 
and junk music. 

How easy it is to get involved with 
shortcuts where you substitute a belief 
for the more difficult work of learning 
and understanding. In this category I'd 
put politics and every religion except 
yours. I've put together a whole long 
list of very worthy causes, any of which 
can derail your progress through life. 

Tm as aware as you of the dangers to 
Gaia I keep up on the redwood loss, 
the rain forest destruction, the whales, 
dolphins and baby seal losses, the 
greenhouse effect, and even that poor 
little snail darter that sidetracked a bil- 
lion dollar dam project 

Yes t I see how the world is coming 
apart, I know about the race problems 
all around the world, the tribal enmities 
everywhere. The wars in Iraq. Timor* 



Chad, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Philip- 
pines, Central America, New Guinea. 
The killing of students in China and 
Burma, And many of these are person- 
al with me because I've visited these 
places and have friends in them. 

My ham friends in Czechoslovakia 
and Poland, whom I visited just last 
year, are deeply involved on a daily 
basis with the turmoil in these coun- 
tries, so what's happening m Eastern 
Europe is more than a passing news 
item for me. I've been to Wanceslaus 
Square in Prague. I've seen the hun- 
dreds of candles burning for those 
killed in fighting communism, IVe sat 
and talked, ham to ham. with the peo- 
ple who are living through this terrible 
period. 

Amateur radio has a whole world to 
offer, it only you can get this message 
across to the youngsters around you. It 
isn't easy. They're probably much 
more interested in Nintendo and col- 
lecting bubble-gum cards 

How much do you know about ama- 
teur radio? How much have you taken 
advantage of this cornucopia of won- 
der to expand your own horizons? How 
can you communicate the wonders 
amateur radio offers if you've never 
yourself even tried them? 

Can you get up in front of your ham 
club and explain how RTTY works? Are 
you comfortable with bauds and digital 
communications? How'd you like to 
tackle spread spectrum for the club? 
How about writing an article on it for 
73? Or even a book? Why not? I've 
written many articles and books on 
RTTY, so why not you? Oh, I'm differ- 
ent in some way? How? Why? 

Yes, of course f'rn different. We're 
all different, But we ail have to accept 
responsibility for the way we are — and 
change it rf we're not satisfied. 

When I was growing up I hadn't a 
clue as to what I wanted to do, Which 
was just as well, since most of the 
things I've done couldn't have been 
predicted. How could 1 imagine as a 
high school student getting involved 
with amateur radio that this would read 
me in a few years to being an electron- 
ics technician on a submarine in the 
middle of a war? 

Tete vision was just barely starting 
when I was in high school so how could 
I guess that Id become a TV director a 
year after getting out of college? Or 
that I'd become a professional psychol* 
ogist a year later? I wouldn't have be- 
lieved itl And then a couple years later I 
was the partner in a million dollar loud- 
speaker manufacturing business. 
Things like this are completely unpre- 
dictable, aren't they? 

Or are they really? Yet wasn't I fol- 
lowing some general goals all along? 
Most of my life was determined when 
that box of radio parts was given to me 
in church thai Sunday; Yet even then I 
was ready for it. Alfie had the same 
opportunity, but he wasn't able to take 
the next step How about you? Are you 
missing opportunities the way Alfie 
did? 

Through the magic of amateur radio 
I've sat and talked with a king in his 

Continued on page 73 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 







TM-441A/TM-541A 

Compact FM Mobile 
transceivers -~~ 







I 




S3 






TO'tfAlfc 



CALL 



P-H 



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SHIFT W TONE 






SQL 




OH/DT 



Here are your new mobile com- 
panions - at your service whenever 
you're on the road! Their compact 
size makes installation a snap, and 
the remote control options allow you 
to customize your installation for 
that "professional" look! 

• Wide band receiver coverage* The 
TM-241A receives from 118-173.995 
MHz. Transmit range is 144-148 MHz. 
(Modifiable for MARS and CAP 
operation, permits required.) 

• TM-441A covers 438-449.995 MHz, 
and the TM-531A covers 
1240-1299.995 MHz. 

• CTCSS encode built-in, selectable 
from the front panel. 

• Selectable frequency steps for 
quick and easy QSY. 

• TM-241A provides 50 W TM-441A 
35 W, and TM-541A 10 W. Three 
power positions, 5, 10 t and full. The 
TM-541A has two power positions, 

1 and 10 watts. 

• 20 full-function memory channels 
store frequency, repeater offset, 
sub -tone frequencies, and repeater 
reverse information. Repeater 
offset on 2m is automatically 
selected. There are four channels 
for "odd split'* operation. 

• Tone Alert System with Elapsed 
Time indicator. 

• Auto-power off function, and time- 
out timer. 

Specifications guaranteed for Amateur band use only. 




RC-20 Remote Control Unit 

As supplied, one RC-20 will control 
one transceiver . Most often -used 



front panel functions are control- 
lable from the RC-20. The RC-20 
and IF-20 combine to allow control 
of up to four radios. 



Selective calling and pager option. 

The DTU-2 option enables the Dual 
Tone Squelch System {DTSS), allow- 
ing selective calling and paging using 
standard DTMF tones. 



Digital recording system option. 

Used in conjunction with the tone 
alert system, the DRU-1 allows mes- 
sage storage of up to 32 seconds. 
Multiple scanning functions. Band 
and memory scan, with selectable 
scan stops and memory channel 

lock-out. 

Large LCD display with four-step 

dimmer control. 

Automatic Lock Tuning (ALT) for 

the TM-541A. Compensates for drift 



Supplied accessories. Mounting 
bracket DC cable, fuses, MC-44DM 
multi-function DTMFmia 
Optional accessories 
DRU-1 Digital Recording Unit 
DTU-2 DTSS unit • IF-20 Interface 
unit, used with the RC-20, allows more 
than two transceivers to be remotely 
controlled* MA-700 2m/70cm dual 
band antenna with duplexer (mount 
not supplied)* MB-201 Extra mount- 
ing bracket • MC-44 Multi-function 
hand microphone * MC-55 (8-pin) 
Mobile mic. with time-out timer 

• MC-60A, MC-80, MC-85 Base 
station mics, • PG-2N Extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter* PG-4G 
Extra control cable • PG-4H Interface 
connecting cable * PG-4J Extension 
cable kit • PS-50/PS-430 DC power 
supplies * RC-10 Handset remote con- 
troller* RC-20 Remote control head 

• SP-41 Compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B Mobile speaker • TSU-S 
Programmable CTCSS decoder 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS & TEST EQUIPMENT GROUP 
RO, BOX 22745, 2201 E Dommguez Street 
Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC 
PO. BOX 1075, 959 Gana Court 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 



aasffira 



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TH-77A 

Compact 2m/70cm Dual 
Band HT 

Here's a radio that deserves a 
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feature-packed dual band radio 
compressed into an HT package. 
The accessories are compatible 
with our TH-75,TH-25, and TH-26 
Series radios. Repeater and remote 
base users will appreciate the DTMF 
memory that can store all of the 
DTMF characters (*, #, A, B, C, and D) 
that are usually required for 
repeater functions! 



* Wide band receiver 
136-165 (118-165 [AM mode 
118-136] MHz after modification) and 
438-449995 MHzTX on Amateur 
bands only. {Two meter section is 
modifiable for MARS/ CAP. Permits 
required) 

• Dual receive/dual LCD display, 
Separate volume and squelch con- 
trols for each band. Audio output can 
be mixed or separated by using an 
external speaker. 



• Cross band repeat function. 

• Dual Tone Squelch System (DTSS). 
Uses standard DTMF to open 
squelch. 

• CTCSS encode/decode built-in. 

• Forty-two memory channels. 
All channels odd split capable 

• DTMF memory /a utodiaier. 
Ten 15-digit codes can be stored. 

• Direct keyboard frequency entry. 
The rotary dial can also be used 

to select memory, frequency, 
frequency step, CTCSS t and scan 
direction. 

• Multi-function, dual scanning. Time 
or carrier operated channel or band 
scanning. 

• Frequency step selectable for 
quick QSY Choose from 5, 10, 12.5, 
15, 20, or 25 kHz steps. 

• Two watts (1,5 W on UHF) with 
supplied battery pack Five watts 
output with PB-8 battery pack or 
13.8 volts. Low power is 500 mW. 

• DC direct-in operation from 6.3-16 
VDC with the PG-2W 

• T-Alert with elapsed time indicator. 

• Automatic repeater offset on 2 m. 

• Battery-saving features. 

Auto battery saver, auto power off 
function, and economy power mode. 



Compiets service manuals ate available for all Kenwood transceivers and most accessories 
Specifications, and features are sutyec! ID change without notice or obligation 



• Supplied accessories: 
Flex antenna, PB-6 battery pack 
(7.2 V, 600 m AH), wall charger, belt 
hook, wrist strap, keyboard cover. 

Optional accessories; 

• BC-10r Compact charger * BC-Th Rapid 
charger* 8H-6; Swivel mount * BT-6 AAA 
battery case • DC-l/PQ- 2 V: DC adapter 

• DC-4: Mobile charger for PB-10 • DC-5: 
Mobile charger for PB-6, 7, 9 * PB-5: 72 V, 
200 m Ah NiGd pack for 2.5 W output 

• Pfi-6: 72 V. 600 mAh NiCd pack • PB-7: 
72 V, 1100 mAh NiCd pack • PB-8: 12 V, 
600 mAh NiCd for 5 W output • PB-9: 

72 V, 600 mAh NiCd with built-in charger 

• PB-tl; 12 V, 600 mAh OR 6 V p 1200 mAh, 
for 5 W OR 2 W • HMC-2: Headset with 
VOX and PTT • PG-2W: DC cable w/fuse 

• PG-3F: DC cable with filter and cigarette 
lighter plug • SC-28> 29: Soft case 

• SMC*30/31: Speaker mica • SMC-33: 
Speaker mic, w/remote control • WH-1: 
Water resistant bag. 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS &TE5T EQUIPMENT GROUP 
PO, BOX 22745. 2201 E Dominguez Street 
Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 
P.O, BOX 1075. 959 Gana Court 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 

KENWOOD 

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QRX. 



Number3 on your Feedback card 



EDITED 8 Y UNDA RENE A U KA 1 UKM 



New Rules Sought 

The FCC has accepted a petition request- 
ing that primary responsibility for the con- 
tent of all automatically retransmitted sig- 
nals be placed on the originating station. 

The petition, authored by Tom Blackwell 
N5GAR of Dallas. Texas, was designated RM- 
7649. It calls for a modification of Part 97, 
adding to Section 97.205 a section (g). 

The licensee of the repeating station, 
whether analog or digital, would hold only a 
secondary responsibility for the re-transmis- 
sion. Basically, he would be held responsible 
only to the extent that it was humanly feasible 
for him to intercept and censor the violation. 
Conversely, the user breaking the rules of the 
Amateur Radio Service would be the one to 
suffer the most severe consequences of the 
violation. 

Earlier, the ARRL had also submitted a pro- 
posal to the FCC on this matter, but it was 
turned down. Blackwell feels that his petition 
may be successful because it calls for some 
measure of shared responsibility. The ARRL 
proposal, he said, regarded the originator 
solely responsible tor his message. 

Last January, as reported in the April 
"QRX/ 1 a number of packet BBS operators 
were fined $300 t and others were cited for 
allowing the re-transmission of an anti-war 
message urging users to call a 900 number. 
The message did not mention the $10 fee 
that would be charged to the caller's phone 
bill The sysops of the packet BBS stations 
have responded to the allegations of impropri- 
ety, but the matter is still on hold. They don't 
know if they will be exonerated or penalized 
further. 

Jim Dearras WA40NG, one of the hams 
cited, says, "I believe it [RM-7649] will go a 
long way in taking care of the problem." He 
pointed out, however, that "primary"' and 
"secondary 1 " responsibilities ought to be bet- 
ter defined. He added , + 'l am also concerned 
that a lot of hams do not seem to understand 
what has really happened. They don't see the 
implication as going beyond the packet BBS 
systems having to screen messages. They 
don't realize that this can be applied to 
digipeaters and voice repeaters!" ' 

N5GAR said that he wrote his rules change 
petition to include both analog and digital 
modes, so that separate regulations would not 
be necessary. From No. 597 of the Westtink 
Report, 



Balloon Experiments 

Look for a student balloon experiment 
which will be launched at 10:00 a.m. EOT 
on April 27 from the U.S. Naval Academy in 
Annapolis, Maryland. The balloon will take a 
2m FM transmitter (144.34 MHz) up to about 
80,000 feet. Telemetry will consist of a CW ID 




Photo A. WB4APR atop the 40-foot tracking 
dish at the U.S. Naval Academy. 

(W3ADO Balloon) and a series of tones indi- 
cating inside/outside temperature and alti- 
tude. Anyone within 400 miles may hear the 
signal. They'll be using a 40-foot diameter 
dish to track the payload as it drifts along. See 
Photo A. Contact Bob Bruninga WB4APR at 
the Aerospace DepL. U.S. Naval Academy* 
Annapolis MD 21402, or call (30 1) 267-4380. 

Spring balloon launch schedule: 

April 13 at 7:30 a.m. CDT. Franklin IN 
(WB9IH3). Live camera ATV on 439.25 MHz. 
2m FM on 144.34 MHz, 10m CW on 28.321 
MHZ. HF nets on 3.871 and 28.331 MHZ. Con- 
tact Chuck Crist WB9IHS at 6455 S, Madison 
Ave.. Indianapolis IN, 

Mid-April. Hillsboro Wl (WB9SBD) Two 
meter repeater Input of 144.48 MHz and out- 
put on 147.43 MHz. HF net on 7,155 MHz. 
Contact Joe WB9SBD, Rt.1 Box 235A, Hills- 
boro Wl 54634. 

May 4 at 9:30 a.m. MDT, Denver CO 
(AAiP). Live camera ATV on 426,25 MHz. 2m 
FM with voice telemetry on 144.34 MHz. 10m 
CW on 28.8 MHz. HF nets on 7.232 and 
28.332 MHz, Sponsored by Edge of Space 
Sciences. Inc. Contact Jack Crabtree AA0P at 
4027 Bellewood Dr.. Littleton CO 80123. 

May 11 at 9:00 a.m. CDT, Houston TX 
(WB5HLZ). Live camera ATV on 439.25 MHz. 
2m FM packet and CW telemetry on 147,435 
MHz. 10m CW on 28.322 MHz (K7IRK). 
HF nets on 7.155 and 28.332 MHz. Contact 
Burns Cleland WB5HLZ at 5106 Elm St.. 



Houston TX 77081 , 

May 18 (morning), Whiteville NC 
(KC4WDW) Students at Southern Communi- 
ty College plan to launch a TV camera into 
space. See the ATV column in this issue for 
details. 

June 15 (morning), Mojave Desert 
(W6BHZ). Student members of the Society of 
Women Engineers (SWE) at Cal Poly Univer- 
sity in San Luis Obispo, California, plan to fly 
an atmospheric sampling experiment up to 
80,000 feet on a large balloon. Telemetry 
downlink will be on 2m FM with live camera 
ATV on 434 MHz. Write to the Cal Poly Ama- 
teur Radio Club, UU Box 53. Cal Poly Univer- 
sity, San Luis Obispo CA 93407 (attn: David 
Ficftou KB60EN). 

June 29 at 9:30 a.m. EOT, Dayton OH 
(W8BI) Live camera ATV on 439.25 MHz, 
2m FM with voice ID on 144.34 MHz, Twenty 
meter CW on 14.035 MHz using a Ramsey 
QRP-20 kit. HF net on 7.232 MHz. Contact 
Dayton ARA W8BI (DARA), P.O. Box 44, Day- 
ton OH 45401-0044. De Bill Brown WB8ELK, 
73 editor. 

SWLIng tor News 

Over the past few months, the sale of 
shortwave receivers has gone up 500%. 
Every country is selective about the news it 
broadcasts, and every country broadcasts 
some amount of propaganda, or material in- 
tentionally slanted to some degree, for its pur- 
poses. Many people have turned to shortwave 
to get the latest news faster, and also to com- 
pare reports of the same events. 

Israel at 9435 (also at 7465 and 1 1605) kHz 
gives you right up-to-the-minute reports at 7, 
8, 9, and 1 1 p.m. EOT. The BBC in London 
reports news about world events that you may 
not hear in the U.SA Listen on 5975 t 6175, 
7325 , and 991 5 kHz. A station in Dubai seems 
relatively unbiased: listen for it at 1 1 a.m. EOT 
on 11795, 13675, 15320, 15400. 21605, and 
21675; and at 10:30 p.m. on 13675, 15400, 
and 15435 kHz. At 7 p.m. EDT, you can hear 
Moscow on 1 5205 or 1 5330: or at 8:30 p.m. on 
7400, 9750. 15180, and 1770 kHz, Budapest, 
Hungary, *s on 9835 (no time given) kHz. Iraq 
has been heard on 11990 or 9022 kHz in vari- 
ous languages. Kuwait was on 1 1 990 (using a 
Saudi station?), Syria tells their side on 9950 
and 1 2085 between 3:05 and 5: 10 p.m. These 
are only a few of the many, many broadcasts 
on the air. Frequencies listed are from B-N-T 
Bulletin, Vol. 19, Issue 3, 

Scanner Law Inquiry 

Early this year, the ARRL submitted a 
request to the FCC, now known as Docket 
91-36, that it pre-empt licensed amateurs 
from local scanner laws. State and focal laws 
may prohibit the possession of ham radios — 
even by hams— if these radios also cover po- 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 7 




QRX. . . 



■ 




Radio Video 



Tahitha Cariy NHEQ is a member of the NSRA home repeater on 146.88. 



Itee or other public safety frequencies deemed 
illegal to listen to, 

Laws vary from slate to state. New Jersey 
requires police-issued shortwave radio per- 
mits; Kentucky law authorizes officials to 
seize and destroy any radio equipment capa- 
ble of receiving police signals; a Michigan 
statute exempts licensed amateurs— except 
for Novices and Technicians! 

The ARRL pointed out that most 2m trans- 
ceivers receive a range of frequencies be- 
tween 139-174 MHz, which includes many 
public safety frequencies. The League be- 
lieves that regulation is solely a federal func- 
tion, and should not be left to the states. How- 
ever, three of the five FCC commissioners 
studying the proposal have already said that 
they don't want to pre-empt local taws; in- 
stead, they want to know how existing ham 
transceivers and scanners could be modified 
to remove any capability to receive public 
safety radio frequencies. Under this proposal, 
new scanners and ham gear would have to be 
designed to skip public safety bands! 

The FCC is also trying to figure out if there 
should be an exemption for General Mobile 
Radio Service licensees and equipment. 
Many hams, agencies, and groups use the 
460 MHz GMRS. one of the Part 95 personal 
radio services. Then there is the Association 
of North American Radio Clubs, representing 
unlicensed shortwave listeners. It has asked 
for a general pre-emption for licensees and 
non-licensees alike. 

The idea that owners of existing equipment 
might be required by the FCC to delete fre- 
quencies, and that newly manufactured re- 
ceivers would be designed without the ability 
to pick up police, fire r and medical communi- 
cations, is an unprecedented idea. TWXW5YI 
Report, VoL 13, Issue #5, 

8 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



What Counts 



Tabitha Carty NilEG, a 13-year-old Gen- 
eral class licensee, has been a ham for al- 
most a year. She and her father, Joe KA1 EX2, 
do a lot of ATV demos at radio clubs and 
schools, The last demo was for an audio/video 
class at the Danvers High School. She is also 
a member of the NSRA home repeater on 
146.88. 

Tabitha is a student at Middle School West 
in Salem, Massachusetts, She holds an A-8 
average, and is being considered for the Na- 
tional Honor Society. 

*Tm jealous of the kids with ham radio clubs 
in their schools/' she writes. "Kids at my 
school think I'm nuts (hi, hi). I like ATV and 
ham radio, and that's all that counts.** TNX 
Tabitha NHEQ f for responding to the request 
for information. 



Drake is Back! 



R.L* Drake is back with a new shortwave 
receiver— the R8. From the early '50s to the 
early "80s t Drake offered a wide array of short- 
wave and ham equipment, For about the past 
eight years, it has concentrated its resources 
on its satellite receiver business. 

The new shortwave receiver, called the R8. 
operates in the AM, LSB, USB f CW, RTTY, 
and narrowband FM modes, and covers from 
100 kHz to 30 MHz. With an optional module, 
the RS can also cover fire, police, public ser- 
vice broadcasts, and additional amateur 
bands in VHF (35-55 MHz and 1QS-1 74 MHz). 

For more information, contact the R.L. 
Drake Company, PX3, Box 112, Miamisburg 
OH 45342. 



"More Than Radios" highlights the im- 
portance of bringing others into the hobby, 
This 28-minute video was created and pro- 
duced by Zman Productions, which is owned 
by Chuck KE7SA and Dixie N70YY Zappala 
ol Bothell, Washington. It was filmed in towns 
throughout Washington State. 

"More Than Radios" video tapes are free, 
but there is only a limited number of them. For 
availability, contact I COM America, Inc., 2380 
116th Avenue N.E., Bellevue WA 98004. A 
tape must be ordered on ham club letterhead 
stationery. TNX Digital Digest. Vol. 4, No. 1 r 
and iCOM. 



Novice/Tech 

80M Change 



The Novice/Tech subband on 80 meters 
has been moved down to 3675-3725 kHz. 

The former privileges were from 3700-3750. If 
you're studying for a license, be sure to make 
this change in your books. If you have a fre- 
quency and mode allocations chart, you might 
want to note this change on it, too. T7VXB-N-T 
Bulletin, Vol 19. Issue 3 



Number One Ham 

Ten-year-old James Catalano KC4SZT is 

the first of four Cub Scouts in Webelos Den 1 
of Pack 1 189 to pass his Novice exam. Now he 
is studying for hjs Technician ticket. He has 
been operating mostly 10 meters, and he has 
already confirmed DX OSOs with countries as 
far away as Australia. 

Like many boys his age, he enjoys playing 
video games at home on TV. But he also en- 
joys the martial arts and playing the piano. He 
has recently earned his orange belt in Tae- 
Kwon-Do, TNX Denis Cataiano. 




James Cataiano KC4SZT. a Cub Scout in 
Webeios Den 1 of Pack 1189, has his Novice 
ticket. 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



The Copperhead 

Keyer Paddle 



The perfect touch! 

by Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ 



How many times have you wanted to try 
your hand at sending CW with an 

iambic keyer paddle, but didn't want to spend 
Mom's grocery money just to find out if it's 
really your cup of tea? Or maybe because 
you're just plain tired of trying to keep your 
mechanical monster adjusted? Or because 
you're still looking for that spring that took 
off like a ballistic missile? Whatever your 




Schmilt trigger IC and two 2N3904 transis- 
tors control and direct the circuit's electron 
flow. The two unused NAND gates are elec- 
trically stabilized by tethering their gates to 
circuit ground. The keyed output is fed 
through a mini or standard l ^-inch stereo 
phone plug to mate up with the majority of 
electronic keycrs. 
The "dit" (left) paddle is connected to the 

input of gate 4, A" 
through a 100k re- 
sistor, and back to 
battery positive 
through four series 
10 megohm resis- 
tors. The very small 
current flow through 
the 40 meg resistor 
string holds the in- 
put high. In standby 
the gale's output. 



there until the ground bridge is broken at the 
paddle. The **dah t+ paddle circuit operates in 
a like manner, with Q2 doing the output 
switching. The inputs of both gates are RF- 
bypassed with a 39 pF capacitor. 

Building Your Own Copperhead Keyer 

The paddle's physical configuration can be 
just about anything you desire, or you can 
duplicate my model as shown in the figures. 
You can bread-board the circuit, or use perf- 
board. For a neat package, follow the PC 
board layout. If you do the breadboard 
method be sure to use an IC socket. No matter 
what scheme you follow, be sure to take spe- 
cial care in handling and installing the CMOS 
chip. 

Woodchucking: See Figures 3 and 4, The 
keyer's base is shaped out of a hardwood 
block 3 " x 8 !6 " x I W '\ to match the drawings 
in Figure lA2 , ^x2 , 4*x 1* cavity is 



Photo A. The Copperhead Keyer — an ingenious alternative. 



reasons, you could consider building the 
1 'Copperhead Keyer," and enjoy the serenity 
of a nonmoving. nonmechanieak no-non- 
sense, electronic touch-activated keyer! 

The Copperhead Keyer was especially de- 
signed for the home project builder who can 
take advantage of a few simple skills and 
fabricate a useful piece of equipment for a 
fraction of the cost of a similar commercial 
item. If you are a good parts scrounger— and 
what seasoned ham isn't? — you probably can 
build your own version for less than ten 
bucks . You can also order a kit (see the Parts 
List). 

The paddles will operate with most com- 
mercial and home-constructed electronic 
keyercircuits using the Curtis chip, including 
the built-in versions in many current trans- 
eeivere. 

How the Keyer Works 

Take a look at the keyer's schematic dia- 



pin #3, is low. When 
the paddle is bridged , 
through your skin re- 
sistance, to circuit 
ground, the gate's 
output goes positive, 
turning Ql on. 

Q Is collector 
switches any positive 
load connected to the 
tip of the phone plug 
to ground, holding it 




Photo B, The circuit is mounted in a compartment underneath the 
wooden housing. 



gram in Figure 1, and youll see just how 
easily electronics can replace a mechanical 
device. Also notice that an on/off switch isn't 
used or required because the standby current 
is so minuscule. The battery could survive in 
standby for its norma! shelf life. 
A single 4093 CMOS quad 2 -input NAND 



B1 

C1.C2 

C3 

iC-t 

G1,Q2 

R1.R2 

R3-R10 

R11,R12 

Phone plug 



Paris List for the Copperhead 

9 volt transistor battery 
39 pF ceramic disc cap 
0,1 pF ceramic disc cap 

4093 Quad 2nnput NAND Sen mitt trigger 
2N3904 NPN transistors 
100k, v* watt resistors 

10 megohm resistors 
4.7k resistors 

stereo mini or standard. Vj-inch plug 



Misc.; Hardwood material, circuit board material, battery snap, battery holder, nylon hardware, solder lugs, 
wire, solder, etc. 

Vou can obtain a complete kit of parts, including a shaped base and spacer ready for stain or paint, 
paddles, hardware, circuit board, and all components postpaid for $27.95 from the author at Krysial Kifs, 
PO 8ox 445, Sentonviile AR 72712. 



73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1991 9 



LEFT _^ 
PADDLE f_>" 
(DlTl 



Oh 






'(OH 



P7 

I0M 



Hi 

lOOk 
— wh- 



ig i 



■i 



T 



a «\* 



X»* 



■ _! " 



»3 



fl|{JrtT 
SADDLE 

tOAMI 



R4 



■0«i 



^6 

DM 



.C3 

-0 i 

aov 



T9V 



.HI 



/T? 



R2 

100 k 

-*Mr- 



r 



T 







ai2 

4 T* 



r 



C2 




at 

2N3-9Q4 




02 

3NJ90<5 



tC2 



CIRCUIT BOARD 
faflgUNQ PAD 



■1 



JT - 




it 




jt: 






Figure L Schematic for the Copperhead Keyer circuit. 



1 (To 



L 






r/4' 



1/? 1 



1 1/2 ' 



-$*- — &" 



HOLES - 

A- FQ* SOVOfft LUG 
B* TO CUM »**32 SCBtW 
C- TO CU*R WOOD SCREW 
■ THRU &A5E FOR *LU0* FROM 
CIRCUIT BOARD GROUND 



u 



5/16' 



"CIRCUIT BOARD" MAT 
COPP£H SIDE UP 



-2 IS/ MS" 



-4 1^ 



■S5JB- 




V6 



HOL£5 TO CLEAR 
#S- V SCREWS 



u$ — ■ ^~ 



,_,, HOLES TO CLEAR 
"* *6-32 SCREWS 



PAODL£ 
5PACER 

slock 



CIRCUIT 904RD PADDLE 12 REGUlREDI 




UZ \m 



DR»Lk u*Z Ttft r©» 
#6-32 SCREWS 



Figure 3, Plate dimensions. 



carved from the base to hold the circuit board 
and battery, 

A paddle spacer is cut to the dimensions, as 
shown in Figure 2, from the same hardwood 
material . The two paddles are cut from circuit 
board material 10 the size and shape shown in 
Figure 3 . Two holes are drilled in each paddle 
to match up with ihe two holes in the spacer 
block, and the corners of one end of each of 
the paddles is rounded with a file or belt 
sander. The edges are smoothed with a fine 
grit sandpaper. 

After the above is accomplished* you can 
drill the paddle mounting holes through the 
side of the spacer block, as shown, and then 
drill two holes in the bottom of the spacer- 
Thread each for a 6-32 metal screw. Drill 
four holes in the base, and mount the spacer 
board in place with two 5/8-inch 6-32 screws. 

The grounding board, a section of circuit 
board 5%" x 3'\ is mounted to the keyer's 
base with glue and a single wood screw. A 

10 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



long solder lug extends from ihe wood screw 
through a hole in the base (see photo of com- 
pleted keyer) to the cavity where it connects 
to circuit ground. 

The paddles are mounted to the spacer with 
nylon 6-32 screws and nuts. A long solder lug 
on each paddle is secured by the nylon hard- 
ware and extends through the base connect- 
ing to the circuit as shown in Figure I, the 
schematic. 

Figure 4 shows the component side of the 
circuit board and parts placement. Mount the 
parts as shown and solder them in place. Then 
connect the paddies, grounding pad, battery 
snap, and output plug wires to the circuit 
board. 

Mount the circuit board to the inside of the 
cavity with a U H plastic spacer and wood 
screw, The battery is kept in place with an 
L-bracket made from a spring steel, 9 volt 
battery holder, and is mounted to the edge of 
the cavity with a wood screw. 



top view V 



T 

r 



MJJOLt 



HARD WOOD 



1P1 V ? 



J 



I 2 1/4" 



2 i>2 - 



U J 



SIDE VIEW 




9 l/2- 



1 



- 



Figure 2, Dimensions for the wooden hous- 
ing. 

Checking Out the Keyer 

With a batten* in place, take a VOM in the 
RX-1 position and connect the positive lead 
(don't rely on red to mean positive, check it 
out) of the meter to the tip of the keyer's 
output plug and the meter's negative lead to 
(he common sleeve on the plug. Position your 
wrist on the grounding pad and touch the 
"dit" (left) paddle. The meter should go 
from infinite resistance to near zero. To 
check the "dah" (right) paddle, first connect 
the positive meter lead to the ring on the 
phone plug. Next, with the negative still at- 
tached to the sleeve, touch the right paddle; 
the meter should drop to near zero ohms. If 
so, your copperhead keyer is ready for ser- 
vice, 

Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ, P.O. Box 445, 
BentonvitteAR 72712. 




MOUNT I NO 
HOLE 



TO R>NG ON PLUG- 



CI 

I 



•7 



1 

■5 



-TO TJPOH PLUG 



' 



i 




.. 



01 



m (\\z aw 



1 

I 

I 

i 

4 



.BArrfftfi+i 



TO 04H- 
PAJOLE 



■b 



-*T0 OlT 
PflClClLE 



/ 






GAOUWDWG RAD* 



I 




TO SLEEVE ON PhQME PLUG 



Figure 4. (a) PC hoard foil pattern. (h)> Com 
ponem placements 



Number 5 on your Feedback card 



The Handy Inductance Bridge 



For measuring small coils. 

by J. Frank Brumbaugh KB4ZGC 



Hams who home-brew antenna tuners, 
VFOs, QRP transmitters, and receiv- 
ers are usually faced with determining the 
values of small inductances. While there are 
expensive digital and analog instruments 
available commercially, their cost and capa- 
bilities usually exceed the budget and actual 
needs of the average ham. Even most of the 
inductance measuring devices described in 
the ham literature seem overly complex, and 
often require hard-to-find component parts. 
The instrument described here is a simple, 
inexpensive but very useful gadget for quick- 
ly measuring the inductance of small coils. 

Description 

The circuit is illustrated in the figure. A 
Pierce crystal oscillator is isolated from the 
bridge circuit by an emitter follower which 
applies approximately 2 volts rms (root- 
mean -square amplitude) at the crystal fre- 
quency across the bridge. 

The unknown inductance is connected in 
series with the bridge variable capacitor, 
which is then tuned to balance the bridge, as 
indicated on the center-zero microammeter. 
The inductance of the unknown is indicated 
on the calibrated dial. 

This instrument, which operates at a fre- 
quency of 5 MHz, is capable of measuring 
from about 1 (JH to 30 \lH. This range en- 
compares the vast majority of those small 
coils that need to be measured accurately. 

Theory of Operation 

The Pierce crystal oscillator, and the emit- 
ter follower, together comprise the generator 
that provides operating voltage to the bridge, 
The bridge is the heart of the instrument. L2 
and C6 in series form the two fixed, known 
legs of the bridge. 

The values of 22 ^H and 47 pF were chosen 
to be series resonant at the 5 MHz crystal 
frequency. Because of the phase relationship 
between voltage and current in a series cir- 
cuit, there is approximately 3.6 volts rms of 
RF at the junction of L2 and C6 when approx- 
imately 2,1 volts rms of RF is applied across 
the bridge, measured to ground. This allows 
greater voltage variation across the null de- 
tector formed by the center-zero meter and 
back-to-back diodes, which makes the null 
indication easier to determine accurately. 

The back-to*back diodes, Dl and D2, are 
required both to rectify the RF voltage and to 
allow the center-zero meter needle to swing 




Photo A. The Inductance Bridge. 




4 



— 1 



Photo B. Internal view of the bridge. 



to both sides of center so an accurate null can 
be obtained. Although the diode conduction 
"knees' will appear at the center zero null, 
slightly broadening it, this does not adversely 
affect bridge accuracy. 

You can use crystals of other than 5 MHz, 
but if you do, you must change the values of 
both L2 and C6 so they are series resonant at 
the chosen crystal frequency. 

Bridge tuning capacitor C7 is a nominal 
365 pF variable capacitor removed from an 
ancient broadcast receiver. With this value 
capacitor and a bridge frequency of 5 MHz. 
inductances from about 1 \iH to 30 \M can be 
measured accurately. 

Using a smaller or larger capacitor and 
retaining the 5 MHz bridge frequency will 
shift the range over which inductances can be 
measured. Using a different frequency crys- 
tal (and changing the values of L2 and CG 
appropriately) will also shift the range of 
measurement. However, regardless of the 
bridge frequency, the minimum capacitance 
of C7, plus stray circuit capacity, establishes 
the minimum measureable inductance. 

Because the bridge frequency must be sta- 
ble for accurate measurement of inductances, 
a crystal oscillator must be used. Any crystal 
oscillator circuit can be used — but the Pierce 
is the simplest and most foolproof. Remem- 
ber, though, if you use a different crystal 
frequency, you may have to use different 
values of feedback capacitors CI and C3. 

This instrument is powered by a 9 volt 
battery to make it portable. You may use 
almost any DC voltage between about 6 and 
15 volts. Using a 9 volt battery, total current 
drain is less than 15 mA. 

An LED in a "free current" circuit is in- 
cluded as a power-on indicator. Because total 
operating current flows through the LED, it 
does not increase the load on the battery. 
Also, the LED will grow dimmer as the bat- 
tery is depleted through use, alerting you to 
replace the battery. 

The bridge is designed so thai its tuning 
capacitor, C7 T has its rotor plates grounded, 
simplifying construction and eliminating 
hand capacity from interfering with the accu- 
racy of measurement. 

Construction 

The Inductance Bridge must be constructed 

in a shielded enclosure. An aluminum box t or 
an enclosure made from double sided PC- 
board material, may be used. 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 11 




Figure /. Schematic far the inductance bridge. 



All of the circuitry can be constructed on a 
small piece of perf board* or a primed circuit 
board (such as Radio Shack 276-150). Keep 
RF wiring short and direct. 

Install the binding posts J1 and J2 at one 
end of the enclosure, as far as possible from 
bridge tuning capacitor C7. You warn your 
fingers to be as far away as possible from the 
field around the unknown inductance being 
measured* 

Use stiff solid wire to connect C7 to J2 r and 
from Jl to the junction of C5 and L2, 

The 9 volt battery can be held in a clamp 
made for that purpose, or attached to the 
inside of the enclosure with a strip of Vel- 



TK 



cms 

Parts Used 

All parts used in this instrument, except the 
enclosure, came from my junk box (yes, I 
have a DEEP junk box. having been a ham 
since 1949). I used an aluminum box approxi- 
mately 2" x 3" x 4* which I got for $1 .50 at a 
hamfest. 

Ql and Q2 can be any small signal NPN 
transistors, such as 2N3904, 2N4I24, 
2N2222 t etc. 

LI is an RF choke. Anything from about 
390 |iH to 2.5 mH can be used. The value 
is somewhat dependent upon the crystal 
frequency. Use a 2.5 mH choke at 1 MHz ? 
or 390 nH at 10 MHz, for instance, The 
actual value is not of great importance as 



^ 


Parts List 


B"M 


9-V battery 


CI XM,C6 


47 pF s Hver-mica capacitor 


C2 


0.1 uF disc capacitor 


C3 


100 pF silver-mica capacitor 


C5 


0.01 uF disc capacitor 


C7 


365 pF variable tuning capacitor {see text) 


Dt.02 


1N914, 1N4148. 1N34A, 1N60. etc 


D3 


LEO 


JUS 


Binding post 


L1 


RF choke, 1 mH (see text) 


L2 


22 uH RF choke 


Ml 


100-0-100 ^A center-aero meter 


R1 


56k, V4W, 5% resistor 


R2,R4.R5 


10k. 14 W. 5% resistor 


R3 


1k, 14W, 5% resistor 


RS 


470 ohm, V4W, 5% resistor 


S1 


SPST toggle or stide switch 


Note; A blank PC board I 


s available from FAR Circuits, 18N640 Field 


Court, Dundee !L 601 1 8 for 


$4 +S1 ,50 postage. Please indicate this article 


when ordering. 





long as sufficient RF voltage is applied to the 
bridge. 

L2 is a 22 (iH RF choke; it's an important 
part of the bridge when a 5 MHz crystal 
oscillator is used to power it, as described 
earlier. Any 22 |jH coil could be used here if 
its value is known accurately. 

Meter Ml is a surplus FM tuning meter, 
center-zero, with a 200 \xA movement. You 
can use any similar meter that's sensitive; 
50-0-50 HA or 1 00-0- 100 \XA movements 
are suitable. Similar meters are available 
from Micro-Mart Inc., 508 Central Avenue, 
Westfield NJ 07090, and other mail-order 
dealers, for about $2,00. [Ed, Note: A suit- 
able meter is also available from Hosfelt 
Electronics, Inc.* (800) 624-6464; part# 
MHE 5. the IQQ-0-lOQ flA meter.] If you 
cannot locate a center-zero meter, there are 
numerous small edgewise and standard 100 
or 200 |lA meters which, with care, can 
usually be changed to indicate center zero. 
Carefully remove the cellophane tape holding 
the meter together and remove the front 
section to allow access to the movement . Very 
carefully push the long metal lever extending 
from the movement to one side while watch- 
ing the meter needle. This will often allow 
movement of the needle to rest at the center 
of its scale. You may have to use needle 
nose pliers or the end of a screwdriver to 
move this lever. Use extreme care so you 
won't deform the lever or break the tiny 

spring attached to it, 

CAUTION: These 
small edgewise me* 
ters, often calibrated 
in TV channel num- 
bers, do NOT have a 
zero-adjust: DO 
NOT ATTEMPT TO 
USE A JEWELER'S 
SCREWDRIVER 
ON THE TINY 
SCREW AT THE 
CENTER OF THE 
MOVEMENT! This 
is a pivot screw, and 
tightening or loosen- 
ing it may damage or 
destroy the meter 
movement- 

Not all such meters 
can be modified to put 
the needle at the cen- 



a) 




J2 



• Ml* i i * 

Hnlfe 

m D1 T 



C7 



J1* -QO- I C5 J 




H m h 



LI 



Y1 



H B5 h 

C4 



[ C3 




H R3 - 



C2 



b) 






D3 



BATTERY 



12 73 Amateur Radto Today * May, 1991 



Figure 2(a). PC board foil pattern, (b). Parts 
placement. 

ter, but most can be. Even if it is impossible to 
move the meter needle to the center of its 
range, if it can be moved a half-inch or so, it 
can be used, marking the meter scale at the 
new needle position as "zero," 

Bridge tuning capacitor C7 may be difficult 
to locate if you do not have one in your junk 
box, Your best bet is to check with local hams 
and radio-TV repair shops. If this doesn't 
produce a usable capacitor, any hamfest 
should offer a wide selection. You may also 
find a suitable tuning capacitor from Fair 
Radio Sales, PO Box 1 105, Lima OH 45802, 
(419) 227-6573 or from Antique Electronic 
Supply, (602) 820-541 1 ; part# CV-230. 

You can obtain crystal Yl t a 5 MHz sur- 
plus microprocessor crystal, from most mail- 
order dealers, as they offer a wide selection 
of these crystals of various frequencies. A 5 
MHz HC-25 crystal is $ 1 ,25 from BCD Elec- 
tro, PO Box 450207, Grand Prairie TX 
75045-0207. They stock inexpensive crystals 
in the range of 33 kHz to 143 MHz T as do 
many other mail-order dealers. 

Continued on page 18 



OVER 45,000 PK-232S SOLD! 



The AEA PK-232 multi-mode 
data controller remains the 
most widely used radio data 
controller in the world. More 
hams own the PK-232 than any 
other radio data controller, and 
AEA's hard-earned reputation 
for quality and service keeps 
them coming back. The 232 
gained its popularity with 
features like these: 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 

Since its introduction in 1986, 
the PK-232 has 
been updated six 
times to continue 
bringing you the 
breakthroughs. Six 
updates in four 
years! And even the 
very first PK-232 is 
upgradable to the 
latest model, with a 
relatively inexpensive 
user-installed kit. 
If you want a state- 
of-the-art multi-mode 
controller, you want 
the PK-232 MBX, 



SUPERIOR FILTERING 

The 8-pole Chebyshev filter in 
the PK-232 was designed from 
the ground up to work on HF 
and VHF. Wedidn't just add 
some firmware to a Packet 
modem to create our multi- 
mode. Our modem was 
proven superior by tests in 
Packet Radio Magazine overall 
the others tested. Read the 
fine print! You just can't beat 
the PK-232 for performance, 
quality and integrity. 45 s 000 
PK-232 owners can't be wrong! 




The only data controller designed from the ground up to be a true 
multi-mode, the PK-232's tuning and status indicators work in all 
modes, not just packet. Make sure the mufti-mode you buy isn't just 
a converted Packet TNC, There's only one number 1 ! 



INNOVATION 

The PK-232 has been the 
one to follow for technology 
advances. It was the first radio 
data controller with weather-fax, 
the first with Host mode, the 
first with NAVTEX, the first with 
Signal Identification, the first 
with TDM, the first with AMTOR 
v.625, the first with a WH YNOT 
command, etc, etc. AEA has 
always strived to "Bring You The 
Breakthrough/ 1 and while 
others have tried to imitate, 
only one can be the best. 



HOST MODE 

Many superior 
programs have been 
written specifically for 
the PK-232 in Host 
mode language: 
NEW PC-Pakratt II 
for IBMs and 
compatibles, updated 
MacRATT for Apple 
Macintosh, and 
Com-Pakratt or 
Commodore C-64 and 
C-128 computers. 



ALL DIGITAL OPERATING 

MODES 

The PK-232 MBX includes all 
authorized amateur digital 
modes available today... Packet, 
Baudot, ASCII, AMTOR/ 
SITOR (including the new 625 
recommendation) and Morse 
code, as well as WEFAX 
(receive and transmit). Other 
features include the PakMail 
18K byte maildrop system with 
automatic normal and reverse 
forwarding, NAVTEX/AMTEX 
reception, KtSS protocol 
support, binary file transfer 
and more. Also included 
is the TDM (Time Division 
Multiplex) mode for SWLing 
that few others have. No 
other multi-mode has all 
these features. 



SIGNAL ANALYSIS 

The first multi-mode to offer 
SiAM (Signal Identification and 
Acquisition Mode) was, of 
course, the PK-232MBX. 
Indispensable to SWLers, SIAM 
automatically identifies Baudot, 
ASCII, AMTOR/SITOR {ARQ 
and FEC) and TDM signals, 
then measures baud rate and 
polarity. Once the PK-232MBX 
is "locked on' 1 to the signal, a 
simple "OK" command 
switches to the recognized 
mode and starts the data 
display. You're even ready to 
transmit in that mode if 
applicable. 

The PK-232MBX makes 
SWLing easy and fun, not 
difficult and frustrating. 



AEA Brings You a Better Experience. 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

2006196th St. S.W./P.O. Box C2160 Lynnwood, WA 98036 (206)775-7373, 

Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. 

© Copyright 1990 by AEA, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 



REPUTATION 

The PK-232MBX has helped 
AEA establish its hard-earned 
reputation for producing high 
quality amateur radio products 
Anyone can say they have a 
good reputation, so it pays to 
ask around. Listen on the HF 
bands and see which multi- 
mode is getting used. You 
owe it to yourself to get the 
best possible value for your 
money. Don't settle for less! 

Watch for the DSP- 1232 and 
2232 coming soon! 




Number 6 on your Feedback card 



The Mini-Keyer 

A smaller and newer version of an old friend. 



by Klaus Spies WB9YBM 



Ten years ago, for a high school project, I 
built my first keyer using a schematic 
from Howard Berlin's 555 Timer Application 
Sourcebook, With Experiments. When I up- 
graded to General, the keyer was a bit sensi- 
tive to 1 kW (the audio oscillator made a 
chirpy noise), but the unit served me well for 
many years. There were ample nooks and 
crannies behind which to hide this large box, 
but there came a time when I felt an upgrade 
was due, for several reasons. 

First, most (if not all} modern rigs have a 
built-in sidetone oscillator, so I no longer 
needed one built into the keyer. Deleting this 
part of the circuit, as well as the speaker, 
made me curious to see how small the keyer 
could actually be made — not because I needed 
more room on my table (compared to my 2 
kW amp and TR-7, even the original circuit 




Photo A. Hie mini-keyer mounted in its case. 



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Figure I. Schematic diagram of the keyer (modified from the original keyer in Howard Berlin *s 
555 Timer Application Sourcebook, With Experiments. 



was small), but to keep up with the modern 
trend of compactness and the design chal- 
lenge it entailed. The keyer could very easily 
be powered from a regulator, so an unregu- 
lated, dirty and cheap wall transformer ($7 at 
Tri-Staic Electronics in Mount Prospect, Illi- 
nois, or about $9 at any Radio Shack) can be 
hidden away under the hamshack table, on 
the same bus the transceiver plugs into. 
Although the majority of hams have a 12 

14 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



volt power supply available in their shack to 
power their mobile VHF/UHF transceivers, I 
wanted to design in as much independence as 
possible into this keyer. If you want to use 
this keyer for Field Day, for example, it can 
be plugged into the same 1 10 volt generator 
powering the HF rigs, so there's no need to 
lug along a 12 volt supply. The only other 
option would be to power the circuit with a 9 
volt battery, but who wants one of those 




Figure 2. PC board foil partem. 



To Packf l# 




V 

POT } Potantiorneisr 



Panel Mount 



To P&ddlo {Com 40 +&V 

To Paddle 
(Del) 






CWOul 






+12 V 



Figure 3. Parts placement. 

things running out of juice in the middle of a 
QSO? 

I also made a minor circuit modification. 
The dual NOR gates (the second acting as an 
inverter) were replaced with a single OR 
gate. Although the typical OR gate IC avail- 
able on the market has plenty of gates to spare 
(there are four per package), it seemed to be 
poor engineering practice to use gates just 
because they were there. See Figure I . A 6 
volt relay can be driven by the 2N2222A 
transistor, if additional isolation is required 
or desired between the keyer and the HF rig. 

For final assembly, I used a deep-drawn 

Continued on page 18 






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16 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 199 1 



Feed b a ck 



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The Mini Keyer 

Continued from page 14 

aluminum box. put bypass capacitors as well 
as ferriie beads on all of the incoming and 
outgoing leads, and kept holes in the box to 
the absolute minimum. 

I have used this new keyer for several 
months, and have found no problems in oper- 
ation. 



Caniaa Klaus Spies WB9YBM at 8502 N. 
OketoAve. , Niles !L 60648-2006. 



Parts Sources 

Tri-State Electronic Corp, 
200 W.N.W. Highway 
Mount Prospect 1L 60056 
(708) 255*0600 

Jameco Electronics 
1355Shoreway Rd< 
Belmont CA 94002 
(415)592-8097 





Parts List 


U1 


555 IC timer 


U2 


74HC73 IC 


U3 


74HC32 IC 


U4 


7805 voltage regulator 


Q1 


2N2222A transistor 


D1,D2 


1N9 14 diode 


R1 


1k resistor, ViW 


R2,R3 


470 ohm resistor, V* W 


R4 


4,7k resistor. V^W 


R5 


50k potentiometer 


C1 


4.7 |iF/35V electrolytic capacitor 


C2;C3 


+ 047 \xF ceramic capacitor 


C4,CS 


1 .0 UF/35V electrolytic capacitor 


Optional side-tone generator 


(enclosed by dotted line in Figure 1) 


US 


555 IC timer 


R6 


150k resistor, V4W 


R7 


3.9k resistor, VaW 


C6 


10 UF/35V electrolytic capacitor 


C7 


0.01 |jF ceramic capacitor 


SPKR 


8 ohm speaker 



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18 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



The Handy Inductance Bridge 

Ccmiimtedfrum page 12 

All other components are items most 
hams already have on hand, or which can be 
found at Radio Shack. An excellent source 
for numerous small parts, components, 
and semieonductors/ICs is: Short Circuits, 
PO Box 285 + Bamegat NJ 08005. Send them 
a postcard requesting their free catalog. 

Calibration 

The simplest way to calibrate this in- 
strument is by connecting known values of 
inductance between J 1 and J2, tuning C7 for 
a null, and marking the value on the diaK 
The circle cut from a panel to make a hole 
for a meter makes an excellent dial plate 
which can be epoxied to the tuning knob. You 
also might merely use a pointer knob and 
make calibration marks on the panel , 

Most mailorder dealers carry a wide selec- 
tion of small value RF chokes suitable for 
calibration. These are generally ±10% toler- 
ance, sufficiently accurate for most purposes* 
and come in values from below 1 |iH to 
around 3 mH. A few small RF chokes used 
singly, and in series and parallel, will provide 
numerous calibration points over the range of 
this instrument, Generally these chokes cost 
between 20c and 60c each, depending upon 
value. 

Operation 

With the instrument turned off, connect the 
unknown coil between the binding posts, Jl 
and J2. Rotate the bridge tuning capacitor 
CI so the plates are fully closed— at the low 
inductance end of its range. 

Turn the instrument on and note the meter 
needle swings to one side. Adjust CI while 
watching the meter needle until the meter 
indicates zero. Read the value of the un- 
known inductance off the calibrated dial. 

NOTE: In some instances, when you tune 
C7 over its entire range, the needle may cross 
zero twice. The first zero indication when 
tuning from the low inductance range is the 
correct one. 

Assuming the bridge to be turned on and 
operating properly, if the meter needle does 
not move off center when C7 is tuned through 
its range, then either the coil being measured 
is open, or it is not properly connected to the 
binding posts. 

If the meter swings to one side of zero 
and will not reach center as C7 is tuned 
through its entire range, then the inductance 
of the coil being measured is outside the 
range of the bridge— it *s either too large or 
toosmalL 

Cost 

If all new (surplus) parts must be pur- 
chased, this Inductance Bridge should cost 
no more than ten dollars. This can be re- 
duced by what you have on hand, can trade 
for, or get from other hams or at ham- 
fests. 



You max write to J, Frank Brumbaugh 
KB4ZGC at 82 Uddelt Street, Buffalo NY 
14212-1824. 



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Number 7 on your Feedback card 



Covert Hamming 

A design for your next secret mission. 



by Eldon Ryan K6BRP 



Several years ago a major man- 
ufacturer of two-way radios 

designed a handheld exclusively 
for those with the need for unobtru- 
sive communication, such as the 
FBI. 

The radio had no internal speak- 
er, microphone* or push-to-talk 
button. It was a handheld that 
didn't need to be hand-held. It 
could be concealed in a coat pocket 
or carried by belt clip. The ptt 
wiring was routed down the opera- 
tor's coat sleeve and activated by a 
push-button in the palm. The 
miniature microphone was pinned 
under the necktie or lape! of the 
coat. The only telltale evidence of 
a concealed radio was the ear 
piece, which resembled a hearing 
aid. 

This rig had a price tag of nearly 
three hundred dollars. 

For less than five dollars, you 
can turn your HT into a device that 
operates on the same principles. 
You can use the remaining two 
hundred ninety-five dollars to 
build the other great projects that 
appear in 73. 

No originality is claimed for the 
following project, since the idea 
has been around and in use for 
some time. Numerous good arti- 
cles have appeared about how to 
adapt Star Sets, Radio Shack head- 
sets, booms, and mikes to your 
HT, 




Photo A 
housing, 



The microphone may be concealed in a defunct pen 
(Photo by Andy N6KAS. ) 




Photo B. 
housing. 



Let's go undercover, . > . 

First, here are two microphone 
design ideas: You could build it inside a 
defunct pen housing (see Photo A); or you 
could use the plastic housing from a quarter- 
inch phone plug (see Photo B). 

The plastic ^barrel" can be cut in half to 
reduce the size, and a mini alligator clip can 
be attached to the assembly with a very small 
self -tapping screw solidified with epoxy* 
The plastic barrel of a quarter-inch phone 
plug can also serve as a mounting for the ptt 
button switch (see Photo C). 

Figure 1 is a schematic of an electret con- 
denser microphone as it may appear in the 

20 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



You can also build the microphone into a phone plug 
f Photo by Andy N6KAS* ) 



operator's manual yoy originally 
received with your HT. Figure 2 is 
the schematic of the modified ver- 
sion. 

Notice that the radio is keyed in 
series with the microphone. 

A voltage is required for an elec- 
tret microphone. This voltage, of 
course, is supplied by the radio. 

It may or may not be necessary to 
decrease this voltage, the mike bi- 
as, but you can do it by placing a 
resistor of 1.5k or 2.2k ohms 
across the mike element, A + 001 
liF bypass capacitor may also be 
necessary. You can determine the 
correct value of the resistor by ob- 
serving the deviation on a service 
monitor or deviation meter while 
speaking into the microphone. 
Keep in mind that you are not going 
to be talking directly into this mi- 
crophone as you would your spkr/ 
mjc or the internal mike of your 
radio. 

The microphone element can be 
a Radio Shack 270-090 or All Elec- 
tronics Corporation MKE-2 (I rec- 
ommend that you send for the All 
Electronics catalog. It's loaded 
with lots of goodies at bargain 
prices. See their ad in this issue). 

Ignore the schematic on the back 
of the Radio Shack package, but 
DO observe polarity. The highsidt 
goes to the ptt button. Notice that 
there are no shields connected to 
the mike element. 

The All Electronics element has 

Continued on page 85 





Parts List 


2 


24-inch lengths o! shielded wire 


RS 278*752 


1 


electret microphone eiement 


RS 270-090 




Or All Electronics Corporation 


n MKE-2 


1 


momentary contact push button switch 


RS 275*610 or equiv. 


1 


mike plug 


RS 274-2S90T RS 274-286* 


2 


Va " phone plugs, plastic housing 


junk box 


1 


2,2kO ftW resistor 


junk box 


1 


0,001 |iF capacitor 


junk box 


1 


mini alligator clip 


junk box 


* Depending on the type of radio you have. 




Note 


k The microphone and miscellaneous parts can be obtained from All Electronics Corp., P.O. Box 


567, 


Van Nuys CA 91408, Telephone: (800) 826-5432: 




the best buys in town call: 
21 2-925-7000 

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EMJL N2EZZ. JAN KB2HV. LEWIS W2BIE 





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LARGEST STOCKING HAM DEALER 
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STOCKED: ICOM. Motors 
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CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number ft on your Feedback card 



Software for the 
Ham Shack, Part I 

Useful ham calculations you can program yourself! 



The computer is commonplace in ham 
shacks. In fact, 1 would say that next to 

the old HF rig, it is the most common resident 
of the typical station. Over the next four 
months, 1 * m going to show you how to use the 
computer to aid you in building, repairing, 
modifying and designing ham equipment b\ 
doing your mathematical compulations. Let's 
say that I am going to show you how to 
broaden the scope of computer usage in the 
shack. 

Each month HI include new computer pro- 
grams. Each of these programs will consist of 
separate modules, or building blocks, that 
will become a ham radio computer system, 
menu driven and user friendly. 

The program part for this month includes a 
portion of the MAIN MENU, a module for 
the design of antennas, and a module for 
measuring the physical lengths of transmis- 
sion lines. Each month, as more modules are 
included, the MAIN MENU will grow. 

Main Menu 

The completed MAIN MENU will resem- 
ble this: 

MAIN MENU FOR THE (your eallsign) 

HAM SYSTEM 

1 - ANTENNA DESIGN MATH 

2 - TRANSMISSION LINE MATH 
3 -OHM'S LAW 

4 -POWER FORMULAS 

5 - EFFICIENCY FORMULA 
6 -RADIO HORIZONS 

7 - OHMS TO RESISTOR COLORS 

8 - RESISTOR COLORS TO OHMS 

9 - AIR COIL INDUCTANCE 
X- FINISHED USING 

ENTER YOUR SELECTION 

Notice the place for tl your eallsign/' After 
all, this is your system. 

Module One 

Antenna design is just about as basic to 
amateur radio as you can get. Without anten- 
nas there is no radio operation. Of course, 
some math is needed when designing dipoles, 
vees, quarter-waves* cec. In fact, math is 
even needed when cutting ground radials for 
vertical antennas. This program module asks 
the user to enter a frequency (in MHz), to 
which it then responds with the electrical 
wavelength for that frequency. Additional re- 
sponses include all the normal fractional 
wavelengths f/2, '*, etc.). The dimensions 
for a dipole cut to that frequency are given, as 
are the measurements for radials, 



by Bill Clarke WA4BLC 



Module Two 

Many recent antenna articles call for a 
quarter wavelength of transmission line for 
one reason or another, usually as a matching 
transformer. As in the antenna module, the 
user is prompted to enter the frequency of 
design. The computer responds with physical 
lengths for quarter- and half-wavelengths of 
the popular coaxial transmission lines in use 
today. This module bases its computations on 
velocity factors, 

About the Programs 

The program modules given in this series 
of articles are written in BASIC. Most hobby 
compiiterists understand BASIC, and their 
computers understand it as well. It is a rela- 
tively universal language, usable on TBM "\ 
clones of them. Atari r ". Apples ", and the 
Commodore series of computers. It may 
well be, however, that some slight modifica- 
tion to the programs will be needed to run 
them on your particular machine. Although 
written in GW r BASIC for use on a clone, I 
have attempted to make the programs as 
transportable between the various brands as 
possible. Program modifications are noted 
for the Commodore at the end of each article 
in the series. 

Entering a Program Listing 

Entering a program listing into your com- 
puter is very easy, although it calls for exact* 
ing accuracy. No mistakes can he tolerated. 
To err will cause a failure sooner or later. 
Generally sooner! 

Depending on the system you have, set it 
up to operate on BASIC, Once ready to oper- 
ate in BASIC, type in the listing as it is given. 
For example: 

10 PRINT "MAIN MENU" 

What you actually type is: 10 space PRINT 
space "MAIN space MENU" (the quote 
marks get typed also). Then you press EN- 
TER (or the RETURN key on some ma* 
chines). In other words, type exactly what 
you see. Be sure to type in capital letters, just 
like the program listings show. 

Thaf s all there is to it. Of course, there are 
quite a few lines to enter, so take your time 
and be careful. Oh yes: In line 12, type your 
eallsign in place of the six X's. 

After you have completed typing in all the 
lines, you must SAVE your work . 

Alternative methods of program entry, 
such as WordStar in nondocument mode, are 
permissible. 



Saving Your Work 

Saving a program is very simple. Place a 
FORMATTED blank disk in the disk drive, 
then type SAVE "HAMl" (on the Com- 
modore, type SAVE *HAMI",8) and press 
ENTER. HAM I is the name we are giving to 
the first section of the overall HAM program. 

There is a reason for saving a program 
before trying to use it. This will all become 
very clear in a few minutes. 

Using the N en Prop ram 

LOAD the new program by typing LOAD 
"HAMT (LOAD "HAMI\ 8 on the Com- 
modore) and pressing ENTER. When the 
computer signals READY on the screen, type 
RUN and press ENTER. 

The next thing you should see is the MAIN 
MENU for your new Ham System. It should 
show three selections: ANTENNA DESIGN 
MATH, TRANSMISSION LINE MATH S 
and FINISHED USING. Go ahead and put 
the program through its paces. Try a few 
frequencies for test purposes, 

HINT: If the menu selections fail to re- 
spond, try locking the keyboard into upper 
case {caps). 

Should you enter into a menu selection you 
don't want, press the ENTER key until a 
small menu appears in the lower left corner of 
the screen that gives you the option to press M 
for MAIN MENU. 

If you have an error in anything you see on 
the screen, such as wording, typos, or a com- 
puter failure or lockup, then reset the com- 
puter. Again LOAD the program (as before). 
However, instead of running it. you will 
LIST it* Listing shows even thing you typed 
in from the program listing. To list; type 
LIST and press ENTER. 

Sometimes when a program fails, it will 
cause the computer to halt operation com* 
pletcly. This is called a lock-up. The only 
way to get it going again is to reboot it. 
Rebooting usually equates to turning the 
computer off, then back on. This will cause a 
complete loss of all data and programs that 
were in the computer's memory. If you had 
not saved your program to disk, it would be 
gone. To get it back, in that case, you would 
have to re-enter it from the listing. Now you 
sec why the program was saved before it was 
run. ALWAYS SAVE YOUR WORK BE 
FORE RUNNING IT. 

While checking the listing, if you see an 
error, use the CURSOR keys to move the 
cursor to the incorrect line. Make the correc- 
tion, then press ENTER. ENTER is pressed 



22 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 




COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS INC. 

Emergency Operations Center 

has expanded to our new two acre facility 
and World Headquarters. Because of our 
growth, CEI is now your one stop source 
for emergency response equipment. When 
you have a command, control or com muni* 
cations need, essential emergency sup- 
plies can be rushed to you by CEL As 
always, for over twenty two years, we're 
ready, willing and able to help. 

Our RELM two way radio transceivers were 
especially created for government agencies. 
When you need to talk to police, fire, ambu- 
lance, or state, federal and international 
response forces, RELM transceivers may be 
quickly programmed for upto48 frequencies. 
Listed below, are some of our most asked 
about transceivers. For additional assistance, 
call CEI at 31 3-996-8888. 

NEW! RELM 5 RSP500-A 

List price S46500/CE price $31 9. 95 SPECIAL 
20 Channel • 5 Watt * Handheld Transceiver 
Frequency range: 14&*1?4 MHz. continuous coverage 
Wtltalso work 134-148 MHz with reduced performance 
The RELM RSP500B-A is our most popular pro- 
grammable 5 wfatt 20 channel handheld transceiver. 
You can scan 20 channels at up to 40 channels per 
second; It includes CTCSS tone and digital coded 
squelch. Snap on batteries give you plenty of 
power. Additional features such as time-out timer, 
busy-channel lockout, cloning, plug-in programming 
and IBM PCcompaiability are standard. It is F.C.C 
type accepted for data transmission and D.O.Q 
approved We recommend also ordering the BC45 
rapid charge IV* hour desk battery charger for 
S99 95. a deluxe feather case LC4SforS48. 95 and 
an external Speaker microphone with clpp$M45 for 
$59.95. Since this radio is programmed with an 
external programmer, be sure to also order one 
PM45 at $74,95 for your radio system. 

NEW! RELM" UC1 02/UC202 

List price 5126.33/CE price 579,95/SPECIAL 
CEI u nderstanets thai all agencies want excellent corn- 
mumcarions capability, but most departments are 
strapped for funds. To help, CEI now oilers a special 
package deal on the RELM UC1 02 one wait transceiver. 
You get a UC102 handheld transceiver on 154 5700 
MHz . flexible antenna, battery charger and battery 
pack for only $79.95. If you want even more power. 
otdet the RELM UC202 two watt transceiver tor S i 1 4.95 



RELM- Programming Tools 

If you are the dealer or radio technician maintaining 
your own radio system, you must order a programming 
tool to activate various transceivers- The PCKITO10 for 
$ 1 49.95 is designed to program almost ail RELM radios 
by interconnecting between a MS/ DOS PC and the 
radio. The PM1 OOA for $9995 is designed to externally 
program the RMV60B, RML60A, RMLBOBand LMV2548 
radios. The SPM2 for $49. 95 is for the LMV25B and 
LMU1 SB transceivers. The RMP1 for $49,95 is for the 
RMU45B transceiver, Programmers must be used with 
caution and only by Qualified personnel because incorrect 
programming can cause severe interference and dis- 
ruption to operating communications systems. 

• •• Uniden CB Radios • • * 

The Uniden Ime of Citizens Band Radio transceivers is 
designed to give you emergency communications at a 
reasonable price Uniden C6 radios are so reliable they 
have a two year limited warranty 

PA03T OE- A3 Umdet* 40 Ch Portable/ Mobile CB .., $72 95 
PRO330E-A3 Uniden 40 Ch. Remote mount Cfl ..$99 95 
GRANT'A3Umdefi40channelSS8CSmobile . Si 52.95 
WASHINGTON A Untden 40 ch. SSB CB base S209.95 
PCI 2 2- A3 Untden 40 channel SSB CB mobile $1 1 3,95 

PC86A A Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile . S7695 

PR0510XL-A3 Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile ., . . .$34.95 

PRO520Xt-A3 Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile £49.95 

PH0535E-A Untden 40 channel CB Mobile 573.95 

PR053SW-A Uniden 40 ch weather CB Mobile . . .$78.95 
PRO&4QE-A3 Umden 40 Ch SSB CB mobile 51 33.95 

PRQ81 OE-A Uniden 40 channel SSB CB Base St 74.95 

* * * Uniden Radar Detectors* * * 

Buy the finest Uniden radar detectors from CEI today, 
CARD- A3 Uniden credit card stie radar detector . Si 27 95 
RD3XLA3 Uniden 3 band radar detector S 124.95 

R09GTL-A Untden "PassporT size radar detector $89.95 
R09XL-A3 Uniden "micro" size radar detector . . $107.95 
RD25-A Untden vtaor mount radar detector ..... 554.95 

Bearcat 6 200XLT-A 

List price S509.95/CE price S239,95/SPEC(AL 
12- Band, 200 Channel • BQQ MHz. Handheld 
Search • Limit • Hold a Priority • Lockout 
Frequency range: 29-S4 t 1 18-174, 406-612, 806-956 MHz, 
Excludes 8233S?$-$49Q125 and 868,98 7$$9* 012$ MHz. 

The Bearcat 200KLT sets a new standard tor hand- 
hold scanners in performance and dependability, 
This full featured unit has 200 programmable 
channels with 10 scanning banks and 12 band 
coverage. If you want a very similar model without 
the 800 MHz band and 100 channels, order the 
BC 10OXLT-A3 for only $17995 Includes antenna, 
carrying case with belt loop, ni-cad battery pack, 
AC adapter and earphone. Order your scanner now. 

Bearcat* 800XLT-A 

List price S549.95/CE price$239.95/SPECJAL 

12-Band, 40 Channel • No- crystal scanner 

Priority control ■ Search/Scan • AC/ DC 

Bands: 29-54, 118-174, 406-512, 806-912 MHz. 
Mow.. .nothing excluded In the 806-912 MHz band. 

The Uniden 800XLT receives 40 channels in two banks 

Scans IS channels per second SizeW xAW x^2' i b." 

If yog do not need the 800 MHz band, a similar model 

called the BC 210XLT-A is available for Si 78 95 



NEW! RELM 8 RH256NB-A MEW! Uniden' MR8100-A 



List price S449 95/CE price S299. 95 SPECIAL 
1 6 Channel • 25 Watt Transceiver • Priority 
Time-out timer * Oft Hook Priority Channel 

The HELM RH256NB is the updated version of the 
popular RELM RM2568 sixteervchannel VHF land 
mobile transceiver. The radio technician maintain- 
mg your radio system can store up to 1 6 frequencies 
without an external programming tool. All radios 
come with CTCSS tone and scanning capabilities. 
This transceiver even has a priority function. Be 
sure to order one set of programming instructions, 
part # PI256N for $1 0.00 and a service manual 
part#5MRH256NforS24.95for!heRH256NS A 
60 Watt VHF 150-162 MHz. version called the 
RH6Q6B is available for S42995. A UHF 15 watt, 
16 channel similar version of this radio called the 
LMU1 SB- A is also available and covers 450-482 
MHz. for only 5339,95, An external programming 
unit SPM2 for $49.95 is needed for programming 
the LMU15B UHF transceiver 

NEW! RELM" LMV2548B-A 

List price S423.33/CE price S289.95/SPECIAL 
43 Channel * 25 Watt Transceiver • Priority 

RELM's new IMV254BB gives you up to48 channels 
which can be organized into 4 separate scan areas 
for convenient grouping of channels and improved 
communications efficiency. With an external pro- 
grammer, your radio technician can reprogram this 
radio in minutes with the PM 1 0OA programmer for 
S99-95 without even opening the transceiver. A 
similar 16 channel. 60 watt unit called the RMV60B 
is available for S489.95, A low band version caned 
the RML60A for 30-43.000 MHz. or the RMLBOB 
fof 37-50.000 MHz. is aiso available for $489.95. 



Call 313*996-8888 for special CEI pricing 

1 2~ Band, tOO Channel • Surveillance scanner 

Bands 29-54. 1 1B- 174, 406-512. 806-956 MHz 
The Untden MRS 100 surveillance scanner as different 
from all other scanners. Originally designed for intel- 
ligence agencies, tire departments and public safety 
use, this scanner offers a breakthrough of new and 
enhanced features Scan speed is almost 100 channels 
per second. You get four digit readout oast I he decimal 
point Complete coverage of 800 MHz band when 
programmed with a personal computer Alphanumeric 
designation of channels, separate speaker. backlit LCD 
dispFay and more. To activate the many unique features 
Of the Uniden MRS 1 00 a computer interface program is 
available for St 9 95 Due to manufacturers 4 territorial 
restrictions, the MRS 100 is not available tor direct 
shipment from CEI to CA. OR, WA. NV. ID Of UT, 

NEW! Ranger' RCI2950-A3 

List price S54995 CE price $259 95 SPECIAL 
10 Meter Mobile Transceiver • Digital VFO 
Full Band Coverage • AfhMode Operation 
Backtit liquid crymtat display * Repeater Splits 

RIT • 10 Programmable Memory Positions 

Frequency Coverage 28.0000 MHz fo 29 6999 MHz. 

The Ranger RCI295G Mobile 10 Meter Transceiver 
has everything you need for amateur radio com- 
munications. The RF power control feature in the 
RCt-2950 allows you to adjust the RF output power 
continuously from 1 watt through a full 25 watts 
output on USB. LSB and CW modes. You gel a 
noise blanker, roger beep. PA mode, mike gain, 
digital VFO t built-in S/RF/MOOySWR rneler. Fre- 
quency selections may be made from a switch on 
the microphone or the front panel The RCI29S0 
gives you AM. FM USB, LSB or CW operation. For 
technical info, call Ranger at 619-259-0287. 




RELM 
LMV254SB 
Only $269,95 

OTHER RADIOS AMD ACCESSORIES 

XC2B5- A untden UUrB Clear plus Cordless Phone $89 95 
CT785&- A Uniden speafcerphon© cord less phone S109.95 
BC5 5XLT-A Bear c 4 r 10 channel scanner Si 14.95 

AOl OO-A Plus m wall charger for 8C55XLT. $ 1 4.95 

PSOOIA C+garetre lighter cable tot 8C55XLT . 514 95 
VCOOt-A Carrying case kK BC55XLT . Si 4 95 

BC70XLT-A Bearcat 20 channel scanner SI 59 95 

BCl42XL-A£fl*ftflM0cn 10 band acann«f SB4 95 

HC 1 4 7 XLTA Bearctt 1 6 ch 1 band scanner 594 95 

BC1 72XL-A Beatcat 20 ch. 1 1 band scanner . Si 34.B5 
BC177XLT-A Bearcat 16 eh IT band scanner .5134.95 
BCS90XLT-Aaearcar lOOch. 1 1 fra net scanner Si 9 4.95 
BC7 aOXLT- A Bearcat lQQch, 12 band scanner. . S254.95 
BC002A CTCSS tone board for BC590/760XLT . . . $54.95 
BC0O3-A Swileh assembly for BC590/76QXLT . . $22 95 
BC655XLT-A Bearcat 50 ch 12 band scanner . . $199 &5 

BC1-A Beaa-a: tnfprmHlian scanner with CB $1 29.95 

BC330A-A Baarcot Intorrnalion scanner S99.95 

BC560XLT-A Bearcat 16 ch 10 band scanner . S 94,95 
BP205-A f^^Cad batt pack lor BC2OO/0C1OOXLT . . $39.95 
TRAVELLER2-A Gmndtg shortwave receiver . . S89 95 
COSMOPOLtT- A Grundrg shortwave recover .... $ 1 99.95 
SATELLtT500-A Grundig shortwave recefve^ . S679.95 
SATELLIT650 Grundig shortwave receive ^ . 5949 95 

ATS803 A A Sengean shortwave recefver S 1 59 95 

741 02 -A Midland emergency weather receiver . . $39.95 
771 te-AMrdrandCBwith VHF weather* antenna . 566.95 
771 IB- A Midland CB mobile with VHF weather 562.35 
779 13- A MrdJanriC9 port able with VHF weather $79 95 

76300-A Midland CB base station . $92.95 

F0E-A Frequency Directory for Eastern USA $14.95 

FBW-A Frequency Directory tor Western USA $14.95 

RFD1-AMI, IL IN, KY, OH. Wl Frequency 01 reel ory . . . $14,95 

RFDSA CT. ME. MA, MH, HI, VT Directory $14.95 

RFD3-A DE, DC, MD. NJ, NY, PA, VA. WV Dir $14 95 

RFD4A AL. Afl, FL, GA, LA MS, NC PH. SC. TN. VI . $1 4.95 
RFDS-AAICID.IAMN.MT.NE^ND.OR.SD.WAvVY . S14 95 
RFD6-A CA, NV, UT, AZ, HI, GO Freq. Directory £14 95 
HFD7-A CO. KS MO, NM OK. TX Freq Directory. . - Si 4 95 
PW B- A Passport to World Band Radio St6 95 

ASD-A Airptane Scanner Dt rectory . . S14 95 

TSG-G7 t TopSecr«r RegtstryofUS Govt. Freq ..$16 95 

TTC-A Tune in on leleohone calls S*4 95 

CBK-A BigCB H and boolvAM/FM/F/eeba no ... $1 4. 95 
TtC- A Techniques tor Intercepting Communications ,. Sl4. 95 
RRF-A Ha 1 1 road frequency directory . $14.95 

EEC- A Embassy & Espionage Communications . . .$14.95 
SMH-A2 Scanner Modjlicatkon Handbook, Vol 2 . $18,95 
LIN-A Latest Intelligence by James E, Tunnel ... Si 6.95 
A6Q-A Magnet mount mobile scanner antenna . , . .534.95 

A70-A Base station scanner antenna $34.95 

USAMM-A Mag mount VHF ant. w/ 12 cable S39.95 

USAK-A W hole mount VHF ant */ \ 7' cable S34.95 

Add $4 00 shipping for all accessories ordered at the same time. 
Add S1 5.00 shipping per radio and $4 00 per antenna 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

Michigan residents please add 4% sales 18* Of Supply your 
la* l D number Written purchase orders ere accepted from 
approved government agencies and most well rated firms at 
a 10% surcharge for net 10 bating. All sales are subiect to 
avaiiabtiity, acceptance and verificatie^n Phces. temis and 
specifications are subject to change without notice. AH 
prices are m Lf S dollars Out of stock ilems wilt be placed on 
bacKorder automatically or equivalent product substituted 
unless CEI is instructed differently A $5 00 additional hand- 
fmg fee will be charged for all orders with a merchandise 
total under $50 00. Shipments are F. OB. CEI warehouse in 
Ann Arbor, Michigan No COO's. Not responsible for typo- 
graphical errors. 

Marl orders to: Communications Electronics!" 
Box 1045, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 USA Add 
S 15,00 per radio tor UPS. ground shipping and 
handling in the continental US, A For Canada. 
Puerto Rico. Hawaii, Alaska, or APO/FPO delivery, 
shipping charges are two times continental U.S. 
rates. It you have a Discover, Visa, American Express 
or MasterCard, you may call and place a credit card 
order, 5% surcharge for billing to American Express 
For credit card order, call toll-tree in the U,S. Dial 
80OUSA-SCAN For information call 3t 3-996-S&88. 
FAX anytime, dial 313-663-8888, Order today. 

Scanner Distribution Center* and CEI logos are trade- 
marks of Communications Electronics Inc. 
Sai« dates 3/1 5/91 — 10/31/91 AD #032591 -A 

Copyright© 1991 Communications Electronics Inc. 

For more information call 

1-313-996-8888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 
Emergency Operations Center 

P.O. Bos 1045 P Ann Arfcor. Michigan 46 106 -1045 USA 
For orders call 3 1 3-996-8688 or FAJC 31 3-663-8808 

CIRCLE 121 OH READER SERVICE CARD 




is the only word to describe this: 




The NIR- 10 is a Noise/QRM Reducer for 
SSB VOICE! It is ihe only device avail- 
able that can reduce noise and remove 
heterodynes occuring in the presence of 
speech, What makes this possible? Real- 
Time Digital Signal Processing (DSP) 
using a 40 MHz DSP chip! 

•The NtR-IO is a DSP audio processor 
that connects to the audio output of 
your receiver or transceiver and 
includes a built-in Speaker Amplifier. 

•Automatically Enhances Voice 
Reception by Reducing or Eliminating: 

Heterodynes & Tune-Ups 

White Noise 

Ignition Noise 

Power Line Noise 

RTTY Interference 

"Woodpecker" 

•Includes a Bandpass Filter Mode to 
Enhance CW and RTTY . Forms a 
Variable Center Frequency Digital 
Filter with Selectable Bandwidth. 
Provides performance that analog 
filters can't match! 

•Work More Stations: Allows Recep- 
tion of Otherwise Unreadable Signals! 

•Reduces Listener Fatigue, 

• A Must for DXers f Contesters, and 
Field Day Ops. 

Order direct: 

MR- 1 0: $395; with 1 2V AC Adapter add 

$12, We pay shipping. 

Orders 1-800-533-3819 
Tech i -9 1 9-790- 1048 
FAX 1-91 9-790- 1456 

MC/Visa. AJlow 3 wks for personal 
checks. Add $3 for COD- NC residents 
add 5% sales tax. 




JPS Communications, inc. 

551 6 Old Wake Forest Road 
P.O, Box 97757 Raleigh, NC 27609 



CIRCLE 285 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



10 

a 

12 
13 
14 
15 
25 
M 
31 
32 
33 
49 

51 

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60 
61 
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102 

LS3 

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L05 

US 

LU 

112 

iI3 

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1*4 

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L40 

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14G 

2B0 

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KAMI Listing 



i CLS 

l PRINT 

SPACES I 2 3 ? r M MEMU FOft THE XXXXXX HAM SYStW 

SPACE? (2 31 s" — »* - 

SPACESl2fe):"l - ANTIGUA DESIGN HATH" 
SPACES (Jb) r"J - TRANSMISSION LIME HATH" 
SPACES U& ) :"X - FINISHED USING* 
1KKEYS 

THEN 100 

THEBt 200 

TH£H SYSTEM 



■* i - 

"2- 
"X" 



CLEAB 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRIST 

PRTNT 

PRIST 

PftINT 

M$ = 

IP MS = 

IP MS - 

IF M$ > 

SOTO 30 

DEP FXMM 
FVA(R) 
F*AtC> 
F»A(D) 
FSAIE) 
FNAiF) 
FXAlGl 
FSAlAAi 
FSAfSS* 
FTfAtCO 



- isr 

- 1ST 

- 1ST 
« IIIT 

* 1ST 
■ 1ST 

* 1ST 

- 1ST 

- 1ST 
* 1ST 
= 1ST 



IAM00»*S»/100 
lbnM+.5]/lM 
(CM00+.5J/100 
(D*100*.Sjyi00 
IE*100»*5>/100 
(r*iS**. 51/100 
IG*100*.})/100 
(*iA*1M* .^> 1MH 
(BB # lSlt.ll/l« 

tcc*is**,sj/t00 

{Dt3*lS#*. 51/100 



DBF 
DO 

DEF 

"EF 
DBF 
DEF 
DEF 

DEF 

East 

:i? 
-r.: 

CLEAR t CL5 

PRIST SPACES* 20) r'ftlFFBIMA DESlOff HATH' 

PRIST SPACES(20Jl*- *--■ 

PRIST i PRIST i FRIST 

IHPTTT "ESTER THE FREQUENCY*:* 

IF I *» GOTO it 

CLS 

PRINT SPACES ^ 26 j : - ASTKSRA DEStGf 

PKI9T: S?ACES^20];" — 

PRINT t PRIST! i FRIST 

A ' 994 n 

B » A*. 75 

C = AVI 

D = A* -25 

E = A*.l 

F - 234/fc 

& = 240/1 

GOSUS 50 



HATH' 



PRINT "DESIGN FREQi "*Z" Hfll 

FRIST SPACES ( 15): "FULL WAVE LENGTH tSi 

PRINT SPACES (15 J i-3/4 WAVE LERGTH IS* 

PRINT SPACES i 15*1 "If 2 SAVE LESOTH IS; 

PRINT SPACES (15J: "1/4 WAVE LISGTtt IS, 

PRINT SPACES [ 15 ]?M/10 HAVE LENGTH IS; 

PRINT SPACES f 15 ) i "til POLE LEGS ARE » 

PRIST SPACES 1 15 I: "RAD I ALS AAEi 

PRINT 

PRINT m V ~ TRY AGAIN" 

PRINT *K - MAIS HEN 

HS - ISKETS 

IF It? - *H W THEN 

IF R5 ■ H H H THEN 

GOTO 143 

CLEAR t CLS 

PBIJJT SPACES ( 24 J 

PRINT SPACES(20h H ' 

PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

INPUT "ENTER THE F RBOU ENC Y H J £ 

IF Z <* THEN 10 

CLS 

PRINT SPACES I 24) ^'TRANSMISSION 

prist spaces; 20 U" — — — — — 

Q = 24S.5/Z 

j\ = .7 5*0 i AA * 2*A 

. &6*Q : BB = 2*U 

*S*Q : CO » 2*C 

.79*Q t 00 ** 2*J> 
50 

'"DESIGN FRJSQl "V MHZ — 
,l i/fk WftVE"5PACES[2 W'ROa 



OtMEHStONS IS 
MALA) 

■FNAiS) 

•waccj 

'FNA(D) 
-FSAIEJ 
*FSAtF) 
"FSA(CJ 



10 



TRANSMISSION LINE HATH" 



LINE MATH" 



E = 

C - 

D = 

GO SUB 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

- : ' I- 1 NT 

PRtNT 

PRIST 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRIST 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 



SPACE? U&h'^ftatiA 
SPACES (10) r "RO0 VQhH 
SPACES (Id) 
SPACES { 10 > r 
SPACES(10 



UlKESSIGWS IN FEB?" 

"SPACGSU0>fFNA4B.) 



"SPACES (10) gFNA(B) 
"SPACES i 10)jFNMe) 
"HPACEJS(IH) :FNA(AJ 
"SPACES ( 10JjFNA{B) 
"SPACES [ |0);FHA(D) 



RGS0 
■*Re5B P'>AH 
SPACES 1 10 J ;"RG5S A/ B/C "SPACES ( 10) jFNA(B) 
8PACBS i 1 fl h * RG21 J W 3PACE J ( 1 J J FNA [ t ) 

WAVE'SPACES (2) : "RGB "'aPACES* 10) ; FNA{BB ) 



" R GHA 

"RGB Fr.jAW 



"1/2 

SPACES I i0| 

SPACE* (10 | 

SPACES ( 10 1 J M RG8X 

SPACES (10) I'^RGSB 

SPACES t 10 );"RG 5S FOAM 

SPACES 110] ;"RG5B A/n/C'SPACESUe) rFNACBBJ 

SPACES ( 10) | " RG2 1 1 *SPRCE$ (10); KSAf SB J 



"SPACES 1 UlrFNAt&B) 
"SPACES ( 10) ? FN A (CC) 
'SPACESU9)jFNA(AA> 
"SPACES (10) fFNA(BB) 

"SPACES U > rFNAiTm > 



PRIST 

PRINT "N - TRV ACAIW" 

PRINT *M - MAIN MENU" 

MS * INKEYS 

IF MS * h N" THEN 200 

IF MS = "M" THE* 10 

GOTO 263 



Line Hod:f lcallom fur tl» C-*4 



nd* ouit alwjtyt tm tmplmc*il am Bhowni 



The following 

SPACES i** J r aufit 

EJM»pi«?; 12 PRINT 'MENU FOR THE XXXXXX HAM ST5TE^I , 

CLS replaced by PRIST - f ihlf t#d 1CLEAR 'HOME* . 

CLEAR replaced toy CLR 



MS = ISXEYS replaced by GET hS i IF MS ■ 
EianpU: 30 GET MS l IF MS - - * TMER J0 

replace the word OIHEKSIGW wltTi S12E 

Other tnhdif icat iqn lints 4f« xypm-4 *■ they 



3J IF M5 = -X* TMES ESD 

231 PRIST '1/4 MA^E- 

232 PRINT "RGS 'FNAtftJ 

240 FRIST 'PRESS ANY KEY rDR MORE* i OOSUB 2*0 

241 PRJMT *l/2 WAVE" 

242 PRINT *RGa *FSA(00} 

290 GET SS t IF ES-" THEK 2*0 

291 PRINT ~E»hift«4 CLEAR/lROrlBl* I RETUR0 



THEN Uic« n 



t»lCM: 



Continued from p. 22 
for each line that is correct- 
ed. After all corrections 
have been made, SAVE the 
program as you originally 
did. However, give it a new 
name: HAMIA. Some 
computers will not accept 
programs of the same name 
on a single disk. Later, af- 
ter you are satisfied that all 
is correct with the latest 
saved version, go back and 
erase the error-ridden ver- 
sions. Then re-name the 
good version HAM 1 . 

Well, that's all for now. 
Happy typing and run- 
ning. More will follow 
next month. [Ed. note: 
This month's listing, 
**HAML % can be down- 
loaded from the 73 BBS. 
Phone: (603) 525-4438 
(73nmgSlGl}\ 



You may reach Bill Clarke 
WA4BLC at RDU2 Box 
455-A, Altamom NY 12009, 



24 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 




THE JAPAN RADIO CO. 




THE NEXT GENERATION IN 
HIGH-PERFORMANCE HF RECEIVERS 



Once again JRC breaks new ground in 
shortwave receiver design. The new 
NRD-535 has all the features SWLs 
and amateurs have been waiting for. 
General coverage from 0.1 to 30 MHz 
in AM, USB, LSB, CW, RTTY, FAX and 
Narrow FM modes. Advanced ECSS 
operation for phase-lock AM reception. 
Variable bandwidth control (BWC). 
Tuning accuracy to 1 Hz possible with 
direct digital synthesis. 200 memory 
channels with scan and sweep oper- 
ation. Triple Superheterodyne receiving 

See Us At Dayton! 



system. Superb sensitivity, selectivity 
and image rejection, Dual-width* noise 
blanker eliminates impulse noise. 
Squelch, RF Gain, Attenuator, AGC 
and Tone controls. Optional RTTY 
demodulator available. 24 hour clock/' 
timer. Easy to read vacuum fluorescent 
display with digital S-meter. AC and DC 
operation. Plus the most comprehen- 
sive computer interface found on any 
radio to date. Call or write today for a 
full color brochure, price list and dealer 
information. 



J RC deP*" Red* CoJtd 



MAIN OFFICE: Akasaka Twin Tower (Main), Akasaka 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107, JAPAN 

Tel. : (03) 584*8836 Telex: 242-5420 JRCTOK J 

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Tel.: (212) 355-1180 FAX: (212) 319-5227 Telex: 961114 JAPAN RADIO NYK 



Number 9 on your Feedback card 



Two QRP Transmitters 

Dust the ethers and bend the waves! 



by Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ 



Here's two hoi little CW QRP transmit- 
ters that you can build in an evening or 
two, then enjoy spanning the globe in milli- 
watt slippers for many moons and not be out 
much toot to boot. 

The first and more complex of the two QRP 
transmitters is the 80 meter "Color Burst 
Ether Duster." It spurts out over 1 wall with 
full break-in operation. Two 7400 TTL ICs 
and four 2N3904 transistors control the elec- 
tron flow. 

The second and simplest transmitter is the 
40 meter "Wave Bender'" thai operates with 
one IC and Iwo transistors, to massage the 
antenna with about 500 to 750 milliwatts. 
This transmitter requires cither a manual 
transmit- receive switch or a separate TX and 
RX antenna system. 

Both circuits can be tailored to operate in 
either the 40 or 80 meter band by changing 
the crystal (XTAL) and output fitter. 

Building the Ether Duster 

Before starting construction, take a gander 
at the schematic diagram in Figure 1 . Become 
acquainted with the circuit while your iron is 

heating up. 

Short leads and neat wiring is a must if you 
choose to build your transmitter breadboard 
style. But if you take the easy path and use a 




Photo A . Hie Color Bunt Ether Duster. 

PC board, construction will be a breeze. Just 
follow the component placement layout 
shown in the PC foil pattern drawing in figure 
2 and stuff the parts in place, Take extra care 
in soldering in the two ICs so you don't end 
up building an unwanted solder bridge be- 
tween pins. 

The output filter coil, LI , is made by wind- 
ing 24 turns of #2 6 copper enamel wire, even- 
ly spaced on a T50-2 to mid core. 

A Radio Shack deluxe plastic project case 



:=-• 




ANT 



12V D.C* 



RF OUT 



40 METFR ORF 

HAVT BFNDER 



XTL 



KEY 





NVf 



Figure /. Schematic for the Color Burst Ether Duster, 
26 73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1991 



Photo B, The 40m Wo\ f e Bender. 

(RS 270-221) houses the transmitter in fine 
style. To duplicate this unit, just follow the 
general layout in the figure. RCA phono 
jacks are used for the key, antenna, and re- 
ceiver connections. A mini-DPDT toggle 
switch turns the transmitter on, and a three- 
wire cable with mini-gator clips makes a 
handy battery connector. 

Firing up the Ether Duster 

Two 6-volt lantern batteries connected in 
series supply power to the circuit. The 6-volt 
junction between Bl and B2 supplies power 
to the two ICs. The full 12-volts power the 
four output transistors. 

Connect a 50 ohm. 2 watt (two 100 ohm, 1 
watt carbon resistors in parallel) load to the 
antenna jack and a current meter (500 mA 
range) in series with the +12 volt battery 
lead. 

If you have an oscilloscope, monitor the 
RF output. Key the transmitter, and the cur- 
rent meter should read between 150 and 225 
mA. A 20 to 30 volt peak-lo-peak 3.579 MHz 
sine wave should then appear on the scope. A 
20 volt peak-to-peak output translates into 
about 1 watt: a 25 volt signal is close to 1 .5 
watts; and a 30 volt output is about 2 % watts, 

Should you luck out and end up with a 
stubborn crystal that doesn't start each time 
the key is closed, just add a 15 to 25 pF 
capacitor between pin #6 of IC-1 and ground. 

Full break^in operation occurs each time 
the key is closed, with the mini-relay operat- 
ing in step with each dit and dah. The antenna 
is transferred from the receiver to the trans- 



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encoder . 1 kHz and external modulation 




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$2495»<i 



SYNTHESIZED 
SIGNAL GENERATOR 

Finally., a low-cosl lab quality $ignaJ c^nfrainr — a iruo 
alternative lo the $7,000 o^neTators The RSG-1Q 19 a 
hard working, bul easy 10 use generator ideal for the lab 
as well as tor p* odudion iesi Lease it 1or less than S3 00 a 
day F*^uf«*!0O*fMf 10 999 MHz -100 H* resolution 10 
500 MHz. 200 Hz above • - t 30 to 4 10 dBm output range 
mi OB output reso-Ubon *AM and FM modulation "20 
f jugiain mabtomern*^ H>apui sator diqn e»vofa,dS, 
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reverse power protected "LED display of al 
n?rs ^no analog guesswork 1 



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CT-70 7 DIGIT 525 MHz 



CT-90 9 DIGIT 800 MHz CT- 125 9 DIGIT 1 2 GHz 




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board cortslruction As units are 100% mavnufaetLjfed 
in the USA Al counters feature I ppm accuracy 





NEWCT-250 2.5 6HZ 



ACCESSORIES FOR COUNTERS 

Telescopic ship antenna — BNC plug. W A- 1 

High impedance probe, fight loading. HP- I 

Low-pass probe. audio use. LP- 1 

Deect probe, general purpose use DG-i 

T* baevefevases counter tor easy viewing, T8-70 

Rechargeable irternal battery pack. BP-4 

C T 90 oven umebeae. 0- i ppm Accuracy, O v • I 



£11 95 

$16 95 

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£1695 

£995 

£99* 

5995 



ALL COUNTERS ARE FULLY WIRED & TESTED 



■ MODEL 



CT-50 



CT 70 



CT90 



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CT250 



PS10B 
PmsceJer 



-EHEQ. RANGE 



20H*-fiO0MH2 



2OHX-550MH? 



tO Mr -600 MHz 



tDHt-t 



10Hz-2 5GH* 

typically 3.0 QHi 



lOMMz-l.SGHf. 
divide by 1000 



SENSITIVITY 



2SmVtoSQ0MHz 



<5pmVto150MHz 



<i0mvta 150MMJ 
<1»mWtoe00MMz 



<25mVto50MHz 

< 1 5 tnv ID 500 Mrtf 

< TOO mV to 1 GM* 



<;25mVlo50MHf 

<lOrnVlol GHj 
<50rnVto2 5GHjr 



<50mV 




SPEED RADAR 

$00.15 

complete kit 
SG-7 



N«w low-cost microwave op pi or 
radar Nit "docks" cars, planes, boats. 
horses, bikes or any large moving ob- 
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1M mfle range LtD digrtal readout 
displays speed *> nmes per hour, **> 
meters per hour or (eel par second? 
carpnone cnaput avows «or asierung to 
actual doppler sfwft Uses two t-ib cof- 
fee cans lor anienna (not included} 
and runs on 12 VOC Easy lo build — 
all microwave circuity is PC sinpline 
KM includes delivery ABS plastic case 
*nli speedy graphics lor a profession- 
ol took A very useful end tuM-of-lun hit 



DIGITS 



S 



9 



RESOLUTION 



1 Hz, 10 Hi 



1 Hz.. 10Hz. 100 Hz 



1 Hz, 10 H? fOO Hz 



1 Hz, t Hi. to Hz 



1 Hz, 1 HZ 10 Hz 



Convon your ejttsting counier 
loi 5GHz 



BROADBAND 
PflEAMP 






Boosi tnose weak signals to your 

scanner, TV, shortwave radio or fro- 
quansy counter Flat £5dB gam, 1 lo 
1000 yHz. 3 dB NF BMC connectors. 
Runs on 1 2 VDC or \ 1 VAC 
PR -2. wired, includes AC adapter 

£59 95 



MHCflOWAVE 
INTflUSlOK ALARM 
A real microwave Doppler 
senior thai will detect a hu- 
man as Far as 10 tee! away 
Operates on 1.3 GHz, and is 
not affected by heat Hghi, or 
vibraiions Dnves up to 100 
mA output , normally open or 
dosed, runs on U vOC. 
CompMB lot MD-3 $16 95 



TONE DECODER 

A cornpteJff kme eoeoeer 
on I single PC JWlrrj Fei- 
lurei' 4u0-5C0C Hz id- 
[usiablp range via 20-lurn 
pori.tfoltage^eguiaiTsn. 567 
IC uiet J lor touch-tone 
bursi Mocten. F5K. *e 
Ctf ado oe tool as a ** 



ft#eon 

5«n «a* 

Convnartt. T0-1 1595 



COLOR ORGAN 

Sao music coma 
.ihve' 3 different lights 
flicker with music 
One light each for 
fygn TucH'ange and 
term Each mdivHauii- 
ly adjust able and 
drives up to 300 W 
Runs on 110 VAC 
ML t kit 48 95 



211 POWER AMP 

Easy to buirj power amp has 8 times 
power oain. 1 W m, BW out, ZW m, 
ifiW out. 5W is lor 40W out Same 

amp as featured in many ham mag- 
azine articles Complete with all 
parts, less case and T-fl relay 
PA 1 40W pwr amp kil $29 9f 

Tft-l RF sensed T R relay krj 16 95 



PRICE 



SI 69 95 



H39.95 



$169 95 



S189 95 



5239 95 



$89. 9b 




FM WIRELESS 
WIKEKiTS 

FM^3 
SHOWN 

Pick the unri ihals rugnt for you All 
units transmit stable signal in 98 - 
tafl MHz FM band up lo 300 r except 
for hi powor FM-J lhal goes up ta V> 
mile 

FM 1 basic unil t 5 95 

FM ? as abovB Pur *nh aOded mika 
preamp S 7 95 

FM^, long range n^r. power *irfi 
irery j e nsiti i r e auckci section, peka 
upvocesio away S14 95 

FM- 3. complete un»t includes case. 
battery, switch, antenna, and rjmiNri 
condcinsor mike Excellent fidelity, 
very small, kit $t$95 

FM-awT, as above, bul tuNy wked 

andErjsled .. 5*9 95 

SMC. miniature sensitive mike car- 
lodge "or FNM. 2, 4 12 95 



MUSIC MACHINE 

Nasi M r* m* plaice 35 d*or 

am ctancal and popular eunes 

PUS 3 *ortf1irn§ SOUflGS U3& & 
fun tor doorbstls. thop, c store an- 
Irances, car horn, munr: bcxts, etc 
Rm-i nn 9V baiK'-y or wall 1rans- 
tortner. Eice*»nt Jpsiker volume 
and etyustabto tempo and pnen 
Add our case sat lor i handsomo 



-■nob»n.CUalo $t£« 



VOICE ACT1VATEO 

SWITCH 

Voice activated 

swiich kM provides 

swilched output wllh 

current capability up 

lo 100 mA Can Drive 

relay*, lights LED. or 

even a tape recorDer 

motor Runs on g 

VDC 

V&1 *rt 50 96 



LIGHT BEAM 
COMMUNICATORS 

Transmits audio over 
inlrared beam up to 
30— use simple len»- 
ealogo up lo V*. mHar 1 
Hum tree, uses 30 kHz 
Great tor ■rt'* 



PACKET RADIO 
Coawwodora C6A/i3r3 packet 

raflio irttertacf Uses famous 
German Digicom *dft#are Fea- 
tures EXAR C Chip set for rsb- 
iible operation— runs HF or 
VHP tones Includes FREE dick 
software PC ooard. all neces- 
sary pans and lull docurnenla 

aa.FC-1 »9 95 



TELEPHONE 
TRANSMITTER 
Mmi-si^ed with profes- 
sional perlorrnanqe. 
SeM-powered 1rom 
phone line, transmits 
in FM broadcast band 
up to Va rmle Installs 
easily an,y*hgfe on 
phone line or inside 
pnone" 
P9-1 ks f 14 95 



or un- 
bug' 

Transmilter + receiv- 
er set, LB56 S19 95 



FM RADIO 

Fj||-fledged superhet, 
microvoll ttwnBilivily, 
IC delector and 10.7 
MHz IF. Tunes Sid 
FM Broadcast band as 
weH as large potions 
on each and ideal for 
bug" mcewer hob- 
by eiperrments or 
even as FM ratio'' 
FR-1 kit $I4j95 



LO HQl%£ PRE AMPS 
Maiie thai recover coma 
AUVE* Smat size lor easy 

installation with Hi*Q tuned 
input for peak performance 
ExceHenl gam and noise tig- 
ure — guaranlead to improve 
reception' Specify band 
2M— PR-ID. 220 MHz—PR- 
20. *40 MHj— pn-*a. 
Eacnkri ft7» 



TICKLE STIK 

A shocking k'i 1 BJmn 
ing LED aliracla vic- 
tims to pick up nino- 
cnnMoolcing can— 
you watch the fun I Ide- 
al for oiiice desks, 
parties, nosey kncMMt- 
aas 1 
TS4iul $9 95 



SUPER SLEUTH 

A super sensitive am- 
plifier which will pick 
up a pin drop al 15 
feet* Great lor moni- 
toring baby's room or 
at general purpose 
arnpfcfjer. Fut ZW rms 
output Runs on A to 
15 vcdls. uses B-*5 
ohm speaker. 
EM i Wl $5 95 



TV TRANSMITTER 
TrftnsniM your VCH or 
TV camera Ihroughrjul 
your house. Stable 
duality signal. lunaCile 
Ch 4-6. Accepts Stan 
dard mdeo and audio 
inputs. 

Complete k&. 
JM-? $t4 95 



BROADBAND 
PREAMP 

Very popular sensmve 
all-purpose preamp, 
ideal for scanner. 
TVs VHFj'UHF rigs 
counters Lo norse. 20 
CrB gain, 1Q0 KHz-t 
GHz. 9V-12 VOC op- 
eranon 
SA 7hS1 $U 94 




$129 



FANTASTIC 2M FM TRANSCEIVER 

SYNTHESIZED— NO CRYSTALS TO BUY! 



Ramsey breaks < he price barrier on 2 meler rigs! Here's the ideal 
fig for field days, hafnfeitj. vacations, second cars and packet frt 
even has dedicated packar connectons! S*i expandable ojode- 
pfftHjaiiiiiiU'iirharMTh. jWrTTnUTna umlilve rkiafrrnverTion 
recewer and EASY assembly Why pay more kv a secondhand 
old ngwrienjrou can make your own for lees Heve some tun wah 
your own truly AJMIEHJCAN-MADE FM ng) Thrs kl comes conv 
pieie axcepi tor ene case, mike and speaker^iCOM or equal 
speakeT^mikes plug right in Add our own Beautiful case eel for a 
prolessienal factory look 

FTR-l4Bkil ... *1Z9.95 

FTR-14&C aluminum case & knob set S2* 95 



2 M & 220 BOOSTER AMP 

Here's a great booster for any 2 meter or 220 MHz hand-netd umt 
These power ooosiers defver over 30 wans of output, aftowrng you to 
hit ine repeater's full quieting while the tow norse preamp remarKahly 
improves reception, Ramsey Electronics has sold thousands or 2 moler 
amp kits, bul now we offer complaioly wired and rested 2 meter, as well 
as 220 MHz. units Soth have all iho fnalures otihe high-priced boost- 
ers at a 'i fld ion of the cost 

PA-10 2 MTR POlrVEB BOOSTER {10 X power gain I 
Fuiy wirea & tested $79 05 

PA.20220 MHz POWER BOOSTER ft x power g*n| 
Futywmsd^feBsaKl .$7995 




« 




■ ■ T-WH 



QRP TRANSMITTERS HAM RECEIVERS 



20, 30. 40. 00M 
CW TRANSMuTERS 




20, 30, 40. 00M 
All Mode RECEIVERS 



Jom th# fun on QRP* Thousands rjl these rnev-ngs have 
oeen sold and ions of OX contacts have been made 
imagine working Eastern Europe *iih a S30 iransreaV 
ler — itiai's ham radio at its best! 1 These CvV rigs asa -dedi 
mates to the receivers at right. They have twCnposition 
variable crystal control {one popular ORP XTAL includ- 
ed), one watt ouipul and btiilt-m antenna switch. Rum on 
12 VDC Add our matching case and knob set for a hand- 
some finished look 

Your &x»a of bands $29 95 

(Specify band ORP-20. 30, 40 or SO) 

a knob set CQHP H2 95 



EZ KEY CMOS KEYER 



Send perieci CW within an hour o! receiving this kill 
Easy- to- build kit has sldetone oscillfttor. speed control 
and keys most any iransmitier. Runs for monihs on a 9V 
battery 2B-page manual gives ideas on making your 
own key lor extra savings Add our matching case set 
tor complete station loo* 

CW 7 tot S2* 95 

Matching case iinoo set CCW SI? 95 



ACTIVE ANTENNA 



Cramped for space* 7 Goi longwire performance wiin 
this doskeop antenna Properly designed unit has dual 
HF and VHF cfrcultry and built-in whip antenna, bi well 
as -external jack RF gain control and 9V opera hon 
makes unif ideal tor SWLs. traveling hams or scanner 
butts who need hotter reception The matching case 
and knob set ^ves The unit a hundred deter look 1 
AA7K.1 S24 95 

Mate r>ng case & knob **1.CAA $12 95 



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Communicate in totat privacy aver pnone or radio Kil 
lesiures lull duplet operation using frequency inver- 
sion. Both mike and speaker or line In/out connections 
Easy hookup to any radio, and telephone use requires 
no direci connection 1 Easy lo build 2 IC cncmi Can alto 
be used to descrarnbto many 2-way radio s>gnats Fin. 
aft your kit oft wsth the handsome case A knob sei 
SS-7M $2995 

■ ft knob sei. CSS £1295 



Bu*d your own mA ham stabon 

am CW SSB recenrers use dved conversion des^n 

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books Very sensitive varactor tuned over entire band 

Pienly of speaker volume, Runn on 9V betcery Very 

EASY io build, lots of fun and educational— ideal for 

beginner or old pro New 30-page manual. Add lhe case 

set lor weti-litted proiessionai took 

Your choice ot bandi 52 7 95 

^Specrty bend WWO. HR-30, HFW0. HR^rj} 
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FM RECEIVERS 




Keep an ear on lhe tocal repeater gang, monitor ine cops, 
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any 5 MHz portion ol the band and have smoolh varactor 
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R nn your own stereo FM statot' Transmit a stable signal 
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Famasttc receiver that captures the world with just a 
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in TOJurr 




WUHT>M 



t 



I... 



IS 



' 'U — 

1 1 i J Mm; 



fur Mi* 



r>" aow- j -. MH* 



I KKcUb I 

I l-TQ 51*4*11*1 



kkQrP 




Figure 2. Panx layout and foil diagram for the **CBED. ' 



-Lei 

l 



ma ^ 

I 



T 



*k?V 









fJ3 



JVC * 




- 



»1 



^T 



IN 
—ww 



as 










^h 




• 



rf» 



M Qpl 



Figure 3, Schematic for the Wave Bender. 



mitter's output with each key closure and 
back, to receive in the key -up position. 

The Color Burst Frequency 

You might wonder why anyone would 
want to operate a QRP transmitter on a fre- 
quency that every color TV set in the country 

generates. Good question. Well, first, it's a 
legal 80 meter frequency, and second, there 
is an unlimited supply of cheap-to-free 3.579 
MHz crystals from secondhand and junk col- 
or TVs. And if you monitor the frequency for 
a while, you'll hear a lor of CW activity, 
including a couple of nets. It's another chal- 
lenge for the QRPer! I'll be looking for you 
on the Color Burst frequency. 

The 40m Wave Bender 

The Wave Bender transmitter is about 
twice as easy to build, especially if you use a 
PC board, Just follow the layout in the Figure 

28 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



and solder each com- 
ponent in place. 

The output filter 
coil, LI, is made by 
winding 20 turns of 
#26 copper enamel 
wire evenly spaced 
on a T37-2 toroid 
core. 

The completed 
circuit board fits 
snugly instde Radio 
Shack *s deluxe plas- 
tic project case (RS 
270-220). The bat- 
tery input, the key, 
and the RF output 
connections are all 
made through RCA 
phono jacks mount- 
ed to the enclosure. 






tD(ICW .3 



m Jo*T1 




t«Xt 






hTA/T KjI 



*H1D & 




Figure 4. Parts layout and foil diagram for the *WB> ' 





Table 1 . The Color Burst Ether Duster 


B1.62 


6-volt lantern battery 




C1-C3 


0.1 uF/5Q-vol1 


disc ceramic cap 


C4 


0.1 uF/1Q0voH 


disc ceramic cap 


G5-C9 


6BQpF/10O~volt 


disc ceramic cap 


C10 


1000 pF/ 100- volt 


(660 pF + 330pF) 


C11 


47|iF/16-V0ll 


electrolytic cap 


D1 


1N914 


silicon diode 


D2 


1N4002or1N4003 


silicon diode 


IC-1.IC-2 


7400 TTL 




Q1-Q4 


2N3904 


NPN transistor 


R1-R6 


470 Ohm 


V* watt resistor 


RFC 


22 ^H 


choke 


LI 


24 turns #26 wire 


T50-2 core, see lest 


Retay-1 


5 volt relay 


RS 275-243 or Mouser #ME431 -1 205 


S1 


mini-DPOT 


toggle switch 


XTAL 


3,579 MHz 


color burst crystal 


Misc.: Cabinet Radio Shack #270-221 . phono jacks and plugs, wire solder, 


circuit board, etc. 




You can get 


a kit of parts lor the Color Burst Ether Duster, including the 


circuit board, for $19.95 postpaid, from KryslaJ Kits. PO BOX 445. Ben- 


tonwlle AR 72712. or call (501) 273^5340 and as* for KI5AZ, You will have 


to furnish the enclosure, S1 , J 1 ^J3, to complete your "DC. A PC board only is 


also available for $6.25, 





Table 2. The Wave Bender 



C1-C3 


0.1 uF/50-voit 


disc ceramic cap 


C4 


0.1 jiF/IOOvott 


d*sc ceramic cap 


C5.C6 


680pF/l00-vott 


disc ceramic cap 


C7,ca 


330 pF/50*volt 


disc ceramic cap 


(C-1 


7400 TTL 


disc ceramic cap 


Q1.Q2 


2N3904 


NPN transistor 


Reg.-1 


7S05CT 


5- vol! regulator IC 


J1-J3 


RCA 


phono jacks 


R1-R4 


470 ohm 


ft -watt resistor 


RFC-1 


10 uH 


choke 


LI 


20 turns of #26 wire 


on T37-2 core 


XTAL 


Arty 40M crystal 





Misc. Radio Shack plastic cabinet, RS 270-220; wire, solder, 
circuit board, batteries, etc. 

You can get the 40 meter Wave Bender, including the circuit board* in kit 
form from the author at Krystat Kits for $14.95 postpaid. You will have to 
furnish the enclosure, jacks, crystal, and socket to complete your transmit- 
ter. A PC board Only is $5,25. See Table 1 for the address. 



The XTAL socket is also mounted in a similar 
fashion. 

Plug in a good 40 meter crystal, and con- 
nect a 50 ohm, 2-watt load to the RF output . 
Connect a milliampere meter (0 to 500 mA) 
in series with battery positive, and close the 
key. If you're not in cahoots with Murphy, 
the current meter should read between \2? 
and 160 mA on key-down, and about 25 mA 
on idle. The RF across the 50 ohm load 
should be between 15 and 20 volts peak-to- 
peak, for an output of 500 milliwatts to slight- 
ly less than 1 watt. 

The 40 meter Wave Bender is basically the 
Color Burst circuit cut in half. Sec Figure 3, 
the circuit diagram. All you need are two 
transistors and one 1C. There's no provision 
for break-in operation. Just about any funda- 
mental-cut crystal will, oscillate in the circuit; 
the readily available and inexpensive FT-243 
type of crystal was my choice. 

A 7805CT 5 volt regulator simplifies the 
battery hook-up, which also allows the circuit 
to operate with an input of 8 to 12 volts. By 
changing the supply voltage, the RF output 
can be set for a special QRP power output 
level. 

Now for the real fun— making that very 
first contact with your very own home-built 
QRP transmitter. Good luck, and 73s from 
KI5AZ down in the Ozarks and back in the 
hilts. 



Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ, PO Box 445, Ben- 

wnviUeAR 727/2. 



RF/Af PROTOTYPE/BREADBOARDS 



tDCtinWIF) 

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73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 29 



Number 10 on your Feedback card 



A Better Tube Tester 

Check more than just DC amplification. 

by John Shelley WA 1 1 AO 



Even in these days of increasingly sophis- 
ticated solid state equipment, many 

hams still buy and use tube-type equipment . 
There's a tot of perfectly usable old gear at 
hamfests you can pick up. Still, you need to 
be able to cheek it. 

Most hams use GM (transeonductance) 
tube checkers in their shacks. I cringe when I 
see someone buying a military or commercial 
checker at a ftea market* because I have got- 
ten very few accurate readings from ihem in 
my thirty -odd years of using them. 

How could these boxes with all their 
switches, knobs, and meters not solve the 
mysteries of the glowing bottles? Simply put, 
most checkers were designed to test the tubes 
as if the tubes were DC amplifiers, and there 
is too much cumulative error built into them. 
The worst pan is that they lack a sensitive 
leakage test. 

Checking Tubes 

I watched military tubes deteriorate. Com- 
mercial tubes soon followed. For instance, 
Western Electric made quality tubes for their 
Nike missile system, but other manufacturers 
soon outbid them, with disastrous results. At 
one time in the sixties, Congress tried to 
withhold funding for military systems be- 
cause their inspections had shown that the 
average time between failures was six hours. 
The resulting hue and cry, along with promis- 
es of great breakthroughs, was sufficient to 
push the budget through, however. The prob- 




Photo A. Vie completed tube tester, 

lem lay in there not being a valid test for 
tubes. 

A Tektronix field engineer once held a 
seminar at our shop to help us learn how to 
fully use their instruments. Ours was the first 
facility at which he found all circuits properly 
calibrated and operating. The calibration of a 
545 scope, for instance, is a cumulative pro- 
cess. Every step depends on obtaining the 
proper adjustment and using quality parts in 
its construction. The probability of their 
changing value or tuning by themselves is 
practically nil. The many tubes involved. 



however, can cause profound changes due to 
contaminants. 

It was awful seeing technicians chasing 
contaminants and repeatedly adjusting pots, 
hoping that the reading would suddenly pop 
into specs. It drove some to despair: A 
Hawaiian National Guard Technician report- 
edly tried to charm a defective radar scope 
into operation by chanting and shaking a tea 
leaf at it! 

To many, the 10-channel AN/GRC-27 was 
a monster. But once tuned with clean tubes, 
they were easily managed by periodically 
purging them of leaks— link or no retuning 
required! 

The worst example of equipment failure I 
ever found was in the ACV/TVM model ME- 
6c/U. Its amplifier tubes were 6BH6s, and I 
never found a good one in JAN (military) 
stock, The meters were totally useless be- 
cause, with those tubes, they would do noth- 
ing but oscillate or freeze against the pins. 

Finding Leaks 

My tube checker uses high sensitivity to 

look for leakage. It is small, easy to build, 
and it finds bad tubes ranging from audio 
amplifiers to UHF oscillators. Using a 
voltage near B + potential, the tester tries to 
read it through the (presumably) empty 
spaces between elements. (Note: The large, 
octal, transmitting -type tubes are not includ- 
ed in this discussion; they arc better tested 
in-service.) 




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J3 
I PROBE Z 



59 



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METER PQ54TIVC BUSS 



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BATTERY NEGATIVE 



METER NEGATIVE 



<4^Qf — £ 



t 



y* wl 



Figure I. Schematic diagram of the fester. 



30 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



If you always thought a microprocessor-controlled 
repeater h3d to be expensive, LOOK AGAIN! You 
could easify spend this much just for a controller. 

REP-200 REPEATER 

A premium repeater with autopatch and many versatile dtmf 
control features at /ess than many charge for a hare-bones 
repeater! 

We don't skimp on d modules, either! Check the features on 
R144 Receiver, for instance: GaAs FET front-end, helical 
resonators, sharp crystal filters, hysteresis squelch. 

Kit $1095; w/t only $1295! 




- Available for the 2M, 220MHz, 440MHz, 902MHz bands. 
FCC type accepted (vtif&Kt uhf commercial bands), 

- Rugged exerter and PA. designed for continuous duty. 

- Power ouJptAt5-l8W<25WoptkjnJon2Morhi43and. tSW on 220MHz; lOWon 
uhf of 9Q2MHS- 

- Accessory add-on PA's available with power levels up to 100W. 

• Six courtesy beep types. Including two pJoasant, sequential, multi-tone bursts. 

• AUTOPATCH: either open or closed access, toll-call restrict, auto -disconnect. 

- Reverse Autopatch, two types: aulo-answer or ring tone on the air, 

• DTMF CONTROL over 45 functions can be controlled by touch-tone Separate 
4-ajgjt control code for each function, plus extra 4-digit owner password 

i Owner can Inhibit autopatch or repealer, enable either open- or closed-access 
for repealer or autopatch, and enable toll calls, reverse patch, kerchunk filter, 
site alarm, aux row, and other options, including two auxiliary external circuits. 

■ The cwid message, dtrrif command codes, ano owner-specified default parame- 
ters for cor and cwid timers and tones are burned inlo the eprom at the factory. 

• Cw speed and tone r courtesy beep and tail timers, and courtesy beep type can 
all be changed at any time by owner-password-protected dtmf commands. 

• Many built-in diagnostic & testing functions using microprocessor. 

• Color coded fed's indicate status of all major functions. 

• Welded partitions for exciter, pa, receiver* and controller PEM nuts hold 
covers, 

• 3-1/2 Inch aluminum rack panel, finished in eggshell white and black. 

• Auxiliary receiver input for independent control or cross linking repeaters. 

REP-20QV Economy Repeater Kit, As above, except uses COR-4 

Controtier without DTMF control or autopatch. Kit only $795. 



HIGH PERFORMANCE XMTRS & 

RCVRS FOR REPEATERS, AF & 

DIGITAL LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 

FM EXCITERS: kits 
$99, w/t $169. 2W contin- 
uous duty. TCXO & xtal 
oven options available. 
FCC type accepted for 
com 't uhf & hi oatfds. 

* TA51 for 2M. 150-174. 
220MHz. 

- TA451 for uhf, 

- TA901 for 902-928MHz ( 
(0.5W out; w/t oniv> 

. VHF & UHF AMPLIFIERS, 
For frn, ssb. atv. Output 
from 10W to 100W. Several models, kits starting at $79- 

FM RECEIVERS: kits Si 39. w/f SI 8& 

- R144/R220 FM RECEIVERS for 2M, 
150-174, or 220MHz GaAs FET front 
end, 0,15uV sensitivity! Both crystal & 
ceramic if fi Iters plus helical 
resonator front end for exceptional 
selectivity >100dSai±1 2kHz (best 
available anywhere!) Flutter -proof 
hysteresis squelch, afc tracks drift. 

* R451 UHF FM RCVR t simto to 
above 

- R901 902-928MHZ FM RCVR 
Tnple-conversion, GaAs FET front end. 

- ft76 ECONOMY FM RCVR for 6M, 2M, 220MHz. w/o helical res, or 
aJC- Kits $129. 

■ R137 WEATHER SATELLITE RCVR for 137 MHZ. Kit S1 29. w/t $1 89. 





ACCESSORIES 




TD-3 SUBAUDIBLE TONE 
OECODERENCODEF Adjustable 
for any tone. Designed especially for 
repeaters, wish remote control 
activate/deactivate provisions S24 




COR-3 REPEATER CONTROLLER ■ 
Features aojustabte tad & time-out 
timers. sokl-statB relay, courtesy beep, 
and Focal speaker ampfifief S49 

CWID kit Diode programmed any time 
in the field, adjustable tone, speed, and 
timer, to go with COR-3 , $59 




CGR-4 k Complete COR and CWJD 
all on one board for easy construction. 
CMOS logic for low power consumption 
Many new features. EPROM pro- 
grammed; specify caff $99 




TD-2 TOUCH-TONE DECODER CON- 
TROLLER Y Full t6 digits, with ic#oaB 
restrictor. pr o g ra rn ma bte Can turn 5 
functions on/off* Great for selective call- 
ing, tool $79 

AP*3 AUTOPATCH KfI Use with above 
for repeater autopatch. Reverse patch 
& phone line remote control are std . $79 

AP*2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
Board krt. Use with above for simplex 
operation using a transceiver . $39 




MO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR M 
Run up to 1200 baud digital signals 
through any fm transmitter with full 
handshakes. Radio rink computers, 
telemetry gear, etc. „,„ .$39 

DE-202 FSK DEMODULATOR v | For 
receive end of fink, , , w »..$39 

9600 BAUD DIGITAL RF LINKS. Low- 
cost packet networking system, 
consisting of new MO-96 Modem and 
special versions of our 220 or 450 rnHz 
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GaAs FET 
PREAMPS 

at a fraction of the cost 
of comparable units! 

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ONLY $59 

FEATURES: 

- Very low noise: 0.7dB vhf h 0.8dB uhf 

- High gain: 1 3-20dB, depends on freq 

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Figure 2. Front panel drilling template. Note that the Radio Shack meter has been discontinued. 
Use dimensions to fit your particular meter. 



By accident, I discovered how leaks cause 
malfunctions. There was a walkie-talkie bat- 
tery on my workbench, with a set of test leads 
attached to the 135 volt terminals. We used it 
to test electrolytic capacitors at near-working 
voltages. At one time, it detected a group of 
leaky, screen-bypass capacitors which had 
prevented us from obtaining proper sensitivi- 
ty figures in a series of receivers we had to 
maintain. 

One day I was checking out a receiver 
someone had brought in after unsuccessful 
attempts to stop it from buzzing. He checked 
the filters and tubes, to no avail. With the 
small amount of knowledge I had then, I 
attacked the problem. Hoping to find a mo- 
torboating capacitor, 1 isolated the B+ lead 
from the power supply and attached a VTVM 
in series with the battery, and the B-f- path to 
ground. There was a leak! Why, though, was 
it not oscillating? 

Next, I removed the tubes to prevent break- 
age while I unsoldered the capacitors. Lo and 
behold, the leak disappeared when 1 removed 
the first tube. Sure enough, there was a leak 
between the filament pins and one of the grids 
of the mixer lube. Apparently the 60 Hz from 
the filament was modulating the local os- 
cillator, and sending the products down 
through the IF and audio circuits. 

As time went on, I found leaks in many 
tubes, bridging all possible combinations 
of elements. I soon found it n ary to 
build a switch box containing a battery 
and sockets, to eliminate the hassle of 
manipulating the tubes and test leads in 
my hands. This became the mainstay of 
our Signal Corps repair shop, and later. 
the Ordnance missile radar shop. We 
practically eliminated troubleshooting, 
except for shorted electrolytics and obvi- 
ously broken or bumed parts. 

Construction 

If you own some pieces of tube equip- 
ment, you should at least build a portable 



checker. In its simplest form, it uses a 50 \L\ 
meter movement instead of a VTVM. This 
provides reasonable sensitivity, and will fit 
into a hand-held box. You can take it to flea 
markets and save yourself from disappoint- 
ment by testing tubes before you buy them. 

See Figure 1. The dotted filament on the 
9-pin. diagram show s the most common ar- 
rangement of a 9-pin tube, SA* S-5, and S-9 
are shown down, to allow you to check leaks 
from the filament to all other pins. Similarly 
treat the most common 7-pin tubes by push- 
ing down 3-3 and S-4 simultaneously. Multi- 
ple pins for any element should be switched 
together. Otherwise, the common connec- 
tions will short. The control grid of a 6AK5, 
for instance, has connections to both pins I 
and 7. Actuate all other switches singularly to 
look for leakage paths. When a switch is 
down, lightly tap the tubes to bring out indi- 
cations that may may be temporarily hidden. 
Then, return the pin to the up position before 
going on to the next one, Pin jacks TP-1 and 
TP-2 are used to check tubes [hat have non- 
standard bases, using test leads. 

I suggest that the panel, at least, of the box 
be made of metal and connected to the bat- 



MOTE 




QmiUStOHS IN INCHES 



NOTES 

( TO WtTEfl P05IT1VE BUS AMO TP-5 

J, TO ftATTEfl* SWITCH AftFJ T*EH TO B* T 'E«T HEGATrvf 
TERWittAL. MOTE: VOLTAGE HiVEJ»S*Qil - THEREFORE 
BATTEHT POSITIVE TEflMlSAL CO*t*)ECTE0 TO BATTfUT 
NEGATIVE /METEW NEGATIVE LEAD. 

CIRCUIT BOARD IS J/t&in Pf RF BOARD 2.6 m ■ 3 4 Jft. 

MOUNT ON METER TEHMIHAL5 WITH RFLAT UNDERNEATH 
AND PRESS OH PANEL B£TWEEM ™M AND TP-2 





Parts List 


S1-S9 


SPOT toggle switches 


JU2 


Test jacks 


R1 


1MEG potentiometer 


R2 


2 MEG resistor 


Ml 


50 pA panel meter 


Power supply 


—Option A 


i 


S10 


Momentary contact switch 


RL1 


6 voll relay (RS# 275-004) 


D1 


1N4004 diode 


02,03,04 


1 N5257 zener diode. 33 volts at VfcW 


Cl 


10 pF/200 vott electrolytic capacitor 


—Option B 


r 


Any 90 to 1 50 volt DC supply 


—Option C 


> 


B1.B2 


67,5 volt batteries in series 




(Eveready #416, Newark Electronics #49F1009) 



Figure 3^ Internal circuit board parts place- 
ment. All parts mounted on perfiboard. (Note 
the optiofiai parts if using Option A on Figure I). 

lery*s negative terminal. 

A tester can also use the leads to find Leaks 
in capacitors and even in wiring. Once I 
found a leak that had confounded technicians. 
They were searching for whatever had caused 
a circuit to overload a power supply . and they 
had found nothing with an ohmmeter except 
the 1 35 volt feed wire to the circuit. Probing 
the wiring, however, caused variations in the 
meter reading. I found a charred area hidden 
where the insulation of a wire came in contact 
with a metal part. It seems thai a nearh> 
lightning strike had arced through and dis- 
abled an entire radar system. It is unfortunate 
that we cannot use a high potential on mod- 
em, low- voltage circuitry, to find break- 
downs such as these. 

Points To Remember 

Some important points are in order. One is 
that sunlight causes conduction in some 
tubes , and they should be shaded during test- 
ing. Another is that they should be clean, 
especially between the pins. Holding them in 
perspiring hands just before testing them 
will show leaks, as will not letting them 
cool off for at least two minutes after 
operation. Each switching operation caus- 
es a capaciti ve kick on the meter, and each 
user will have to decide on a tolerable 
residual reading for his particular setup. 

Also, if solder flux other than rosin is 
used to build the tester, all socket pins will 
show leakage— permanently. Surprising* 
ly, some leakage paths show diode char- 
acteristics, so a thorough test w r ould re- 
quire starting with all switches down and 
sequencing them upward in addition to the 
initial test. 

In spite of their high-power con sumption, 
tubes are one of the greatest inventions in 
history. When not contaminated, they 
give many years of reliable service. 



32 73 Amateur Badio Today * May, 1991 



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Number 1 1 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Peter Ferrand WB2QLL 



TheJPSNIR-10 

Separate the words from the noise. 



JPS Communications, inc. 

P.O. Box 97757 

5516 Old Wake Forest Road 

Raleigh NC 27609 

Tech Info; (919)790-1048 

Orders: (800) 533-3819 

Price Class: NIR-10, $395; 

AC Adapter, $12, including shipping. 




Ill II you ever do is listen to noise!" Is that 

t\ how people have described your hob- 
by? Now, thanks to state-of-the-art digital sig- 
nal processing , you don't have to listen to that 
complaint— or to most of the noise— anymore. 

The JPS NIR-10 Noise/Interference Reduc- 
tion Unit is the first unit on the ham market to 
identify what human speech sounds like, then 
separate it from most of the other staff on the 
band: Ignition and power line noise, computer 
noise, heterodynes, and even the white noise 
generated by atmospheric conditions and 
within the receiver. It won't make listening to 
75 meter sideband sound like your local FM 
broadcast station, but under reasonable con- 
ditions the constant racket under single side- 
band voice signals will hardly be noticeable 
anymore. If you've been hearing that same 
noise for more than 30 years, as I have, you 
may not even think about it, but noise is fatigu- 
ing. It has left me with a ringing in the ears— 
even after an interesting QSO. 

The NIR-10 won*t take a signal that's down 
in the noise and magically bring it out into the 
clear (one of my fondest dreams), Its biggest 
improvement is on signals at least one-half to 
one S-unil above the noise, where there's 
enough speech information to extract. Take a 
quick look at the before and after oscilloscope 
plots in Figures 1 and 2. In each, the top trace 
is the noisy HF sideband signal from the re- 
ceiver; the bottom trace shows the audio out- 
put of the NIR-10, cleaned up and slightly 
delayed. 

The NIR-10 is wired up between your receiv- 
er's speaker output and its speaker, just like a 
standard audio filter, although JPS doesn't 
want you to think of the unit as a filter in the 
normal sense of the word. Actually, the NIR-1 
has two modes: the NIR mode which sepa- 
rates the speech sounds from the noise, and a 
bandpass mode which acts as a very selective 
filter. 

The bandpass mode is intended primarily 
for nonvoice modes, and provides a choice of 
three bandwidths and a variable center fre- 

34 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1991 



quency. Since digital 
signal processing 
(DSP) is used for the 
bandpass filter, the 
sides of the filter's 
slope are very nearly 
straight when plotted on a 
graph showing bandwidth versus am- 
plitude. Ultimate selectivity is achieved at just 
slightly beyond the three bandwidths of 200, 
600. and 1 ,500 Hz. 

The bandpass mode performs well and is 
sharper than the analog or switched-capaci- 
tor designs I've used, but most of this review 
concerns the NIR mode, since that's what 
really makes the product unique. 

Getting Started 

The NIR-10 is a small black box, 2" x 7" x 6" 
(HWD) that will sit discretely atop your rig. 
This is probably the best spot for it, since you 
will be frequently manipulating the controls. 

Hookup couldn't be easier: Audio from the 
receiver goes into the input jack, and your 
station speaker goes to the NIR-10 output 
jack. All that remains is to feed in power from 
the optional wail transformer or your regular 
station supply, 11 to 15 volts DC at 1 amp 
peak. Then you turn the receiver volume con- 
trol up to the point where the NIR-10 "peak" 
indicator begins to flash on voice peaks, and 
from then on use the NIR-1 0's volume control 
to adjust the speaker level, 

A toggle switch moves the NIR-1 between 
bypass, bandpass, and NIR modes. When in 
NIR mode, a rotary control also adjusts the 
level of interference reduction; the same con- 
trol adjusts the device's center frequency 
when in bandpass mode. The rest of the front 
panel includes a three-position bandwidth 
switch for the bandpass mode, a headphone 
jack, and the on toff switch. 

The World of Noise 

The big problem with noise reduction is that 
there's an infinite variety of different types of 
noise, Any noise reduction scheme must rep- 
resent the designer's best guess on what the 
difference is between the noise and the de- 
sired signal. You've probably noticed how the 
noise blanker on one rig works better on par- 
ticular types of noise, and a different rig can 
best eliminate a different sort of noise. 

As the NIR-10 tries to separate noise from 
speech sounds, it runs into the basic limita- 



tion that speech corrupted by noise doesn't 

sound much like speech anymore. So if 
there's not much difference between the 
noise and the signal, there's not much it can 
do, and removing the noise leaves you without 
an intelligible signal. Depending upon the 
specific noise, the NIR-10 will produce its 
most impressive noise reduction when the de- 
sired signal is about one S-unit stronger than 
the average noise level. JPS specifies that the 
NIR-10 is capable of up to 20 dB of white noise 
reduction, and 40 dB of tone elimination. Keep 
in mind, though, that the inherent limitation of 
the NIR-10 is that the stronger the signal, the 
more noise it will eliminate. 

The NIR-10 does a superb job on ignition 
interference, where cutting down the typically 
high noise level makes for far easier listening. 
While the NIR-10 will reduce tones and hetero- 
dynes, it won't get them all the way down, as a 
notch filter will. Keep in mind, however, that a 
notch filter will only handle one tone, while the 
NIR-10 will reduce all the tones it finds. 

On the other hand, since adjacent channel 
splatter from other stations is a form of 
speech, the NIR-10 won't reduce them at all; 
its NIR mode does not reduce bandwidth be- 
yond the 3.2 kHz it normally passes. So, a 
notch filter and a conventional bandpass fitter 
are still useful, I find they work better if they act 
on the signal before it gets to the NIR-10. A 
noise limiter is still useful, since some types of 
static crashes are too fast for the device to 
respond to 

The NIR-10 works on speech, so it will work 
fine with AM, FM, and SSB, but music is pretty 
badly chopped up. You can still generally hear 
the speech component of music, and that's 
useful if you're trying to ID a broadcaster. 

Note that the action of the digital processing 
produces a delay between the input and the 
output signals of about 130 milliseconds. This 
isn't normally a major problem, and you'll 
quickly get used to a backlash-type effect as 
you tune around. It does, however, make the 
unit unsuitable for fast turnaround modes, 
such as two-way AMTOR. 

Seeing the Effect 

To illustrate the effect and create Figures 1 
and 2, I used a LeCroy 9410 digital oscillo- 
scope. I tuned the receiver to a sideband sta- 
tion, and displayed amplitude in the vertical 
axis and time in the horizontal, using a plotter 
to create a printout. The top trace shows the 




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Main Menu 






LeCrcy 



i l i 



I Ilk Ji j hk ,«i I 



Hl^rapH 



BT!.T!ip|5!|! 



W 



i— 5 



i A 



> i 




Chan 1 
.5© 50 mV 

Chan2 

,5 s 50 mV 



cm 



-4mV X 



CHI 50 wV - 
CH2 50 mV ~ 

T/div ,5 s 



Figure 1. A 20 meter sideband signal partially covered with power line noise. Note the difference 
between the top trace, the input to the NIR-10, and the bottom trace, showing thecleaned-up output. 



Main flenu 



ntrf 



ii i 

1 111 H j-.jiK U Jll I i J iki.il . jkJ " 



LeCrcy 



ii .Ji,* i.|- 111 ill U Allh 1*1 l.i 

L JUlklJWUUII ii 



\ 




Chan 1 
,5© 50 mV 

Chan2 
.5s 50 mV 



CHI 50 mV * 
CH2 50 mV - 

T/div .5 s 



Figure 2. A 40 meter sideband signal during the midday (top trace), The bottom trace shows the results 
after processing by the NIR-10. The increased dynamic range between the signal and noise is quite 
obvious. 

Alt scope traces taken with a LeCroy 94 10 digital oscilloscope contributed by John Seney WD 1 V. 



audio input to the N1R-1 0; the bottom the output. 

Figure 1 shows a 20 meter signal with a 
severe local power line noise, mostly in the 
first half of the trace. The NIR-10 had no trou- 
ble eliminating it, leaving something close to a 
normal speech pattern. 

Figure 2 shows a 40 meter midday QSO 
with more random atmospherics. You can 
easily see the speech waveforms and their 
amplitudes preserved, while the noise be- 
tween the speech bursts is greatly reduced. 
You can also clearly see the offset between 
the input and output traces, showing the unit's 
internal delay. 

What the plots don + t show is the effect of 

36 73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1 991 



adjusting the NIR level control. A signal close 

to the noise level would allow only a small 
amount of noise reduction, perhaps in the 9 
o'clock position of the control, before it be- 
comes too choppy to be intelligible. As the 
signal becomes stronger, you can turn up the 
control for more noise reduction, with most 
signals optimized with the NIR control at about 
12 o'clock. 

As the noise reduction takes place, you'll 
notice that the remaining noise sounds a lot 
different than you're used to, primarily because 
It has been "de-randomized" into low-level, 
very short-duration tones described as "beed- 
ely-beeps." It's not annoying, just different. 



CW operation is improved in the NIR mode, 
too, except for slow CW, which the device will 
try to attenuate. By greatly reducing the noise, 
copy via a computer system such as a multi- 
mode TNC produces a lot fewer errors. 

Operating Notes 

J PS has cleverly provided the capability to 
switch the NIR-10 into bypass mode elec- 
tronically, in addition to using the front panel 
switch. Thus, you can connect the "remote 
bypass" to the push-to-talk line of your rig 
and monitor your transmissions without the 
delay. 

The NIR-10 can also be used for transmit- 
ting, providing a more effective method of 
communicating in a higfmoise environment 
than a noise-canceling microphone. You*ll 
have to work up your own switching scheme if 
you want to use the same unit for both trans- 
mitting and receiving. 

JPS provides a concise but complete manu- 
al, describing both the hookups and the phi- 
losophy of the N I R-1 0's design and operation. 
This approach is especially valuable because 
the NIR-10 represents a new category of 
equipment on the market. A partial schematic 
is included for troubleshooting the simpler 
parts of the set: a block diagram illustrates the 
actual DSP logic, 

Even in bypass mode, the NIR-10 still works 
as an amplifier and the volume control is in the 
circuit, meaning it has to be powered up in 
order to hear anything fed to it. It's a minor 
quibble, but I find setup and troubleshooting 
simpler when things are completely out of the 
circuit when bypassed. 

All digital devices tend to create noise of 
their own, and the NIR-10 under test did pro- 
duce some digital noise on a nearby broad- 
cast radio, although there was no noise de- 
tectable on my ham equipment when attached 
to an external antenna. JPS says improve- 
ments in shielding and filtering have greatly 
reduced this effect in current production units. 

Physically, the NlfMO's workmanship is ex- 
cellent and shows evidence of the JPS com- 
mercial equipment line, from which it's been 
adapted. 

It s Worth Having 

We're going to be seeing a lot more of digital 
signal processing in our communications 
equipment, and it's fun to think about a future 
where we can sit at a keyboard and optimize 
all possible signal conditioning parameters to 
combat any interference. On the other hand, I 
have a half dozen audio filters and sometimes 
I think all they do is provide knobs to turn when 
there's no signal to hear. 

At no time was there ever a signal I could 
copy with the NIR-10 that was unintelligible 
without it Yet the NIR-10 requires minimum 
tinkering and does exactly what it is sup- 
posed to do: make ham radio contacts easier 
to listen to. If you are tired of all the noise in 
your ears, and especially if you spend a lot of 
time listening, then the JPS NIR-10 is worth 
having. 



Contact Peter Ferrand WB2QLL at 65 Ather- 
ton A venue , Nashua NH 03060- 1904. 



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ideal for apartments, condominiums, RVs, portable use: also 
great for the ham who wants to avoid the hassles of a high-priced 
high-gain yagi — tower, guy wire, tumbuckles, insulators, concrete, 
guy stays, rotators, construction permits, etc.: isolated from the 
feedline to keep stray RF to a minimum; narrow bandwidth reduces 
TVI potential and attenuates out-of-band signals: handles up to 
150 watts; can mount in an attic or on an apartment balcony; weighs 
only 14 lbs; tuning is accomplished with the small LC-2 remote 
control box (supplied) which sits in the ham shack (50 ft. motor 
cable also supplied); omni -directional radiation pattern when 
mounted in the horizontal plane: vertical mounting provides a null 
in a desired direction: maximum radiation is always at lower 
angles than a dipole at the same elevation $319.95 



® Hot Rod™ Telescoping Antennas: high-performance 
hand-held antennas; three models available — HR-1 for 144 
MHz, HR-2 for 220 MHz and HR-4 for 440 MHz; maximum gain 
and extended range; higher gain than any 5/8 wave telescopic 
antenna for handhelds for their respective bands; the Hot Rod is 
shorter and lighter than a 5/8 wave, placing less stress on the 
hand-held antenna connector and case; can handle up to 25 
watts of power: excellent for portable base or mobile use; when 
collapsed the Hot Rod performs electrically like helical quarter- 
wave flexible antenna ("rubber duck") . . , . Your Choice §19.95 



IsoLoop Specifications: 


Nominal Impedance 
Power Rating 
VSWR 
Temperature Range 

Dimensions 
Maximum Mast OD 
Coax Connector 
Gain over dipole 


50 ohms 

1 50 watts 

Less than 1 .5:1 {no nearby obstructions) 

Operating to 150 degrees F 

Storage -50 to +200 degrees F 

43" (109cm) diameter circle 

2" (51 mm) 

UHF (SO-239) 

Depends on elevation 


Mast and coaxial cable not included. 



Specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. Prices 
fisted are suggested Amateur Net through participating dealers. 

Technical support may be obtained through CompuServe's Hamn&t 
forum. Messages should be addressed to user ID 076702. 1013. 



Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box C2160/2006 196th St. S.W. Lynnwood. WA 98036-0918 
Technical Support & Sales: (206) 775-7373 Fax: (206) 775-2340 

© Copyright 1991 by AEA Inc. All Rights Reserved 



wMnl 





Alinco's New DJ-F1/F4T Realized 
Super Compact Body and Plenty 
of Features including: 

*40 Memory Channels store Frequen- 
cy, Shift direction, Split operation Set- 
ting, Tone encoder/Tone decoder 
setting (with optional Tone squelch unit), 
DSQ setting, Tone frequency and Off- 
set frequency independently, 

'Digital Signal Display and Memory 
Function 

The DJ-F1T/F4T has special 

memory channels for transmitting, 
receiving, and store "Two Digit" 
DTMF Tones, for communication 
messages. This feature allows 
for the DJ-F1T/F4T to receive a 
"Two Digit" message and dis- 
play it at any later time, at the 
convenience of the operator, 

'Wide Band Receiving 
range 

F1T:140-170MHz(AM Mode 
118-1 36MHz after modify 
cation) 
F4T:430-460MHz 




Battery Pack Lock 
Pager and Code Squelch 
Triple Stage Selective Power Output 
5W Output Power with Optional 
Battery Pack EBP-18N 
*8 Scan Modes 

* Programmable VFO Range Func- 
tion 

*Battery Save Function 
•Six Channel Steps - 5 t 10, 12-5, 
15, 20 , and 25 KHz 
"Priority Function (Dual Watch) 
"Automatic Power Off (Pro- 
grammable Timed) 

* Automatic Dialer Function 

* Illuminated DTMF Keypad 
*Many Optional Accessories 

such as: 

EMS-8: Remote Control 

Speaker/Mic. 

EME-1 T.Earphone/Mic, with 

PTT/VOX 

EME-10:Headset with PTT/VOX 
EJ-2U:Tone squelch Unit 
EDC-33:Quick Charger (Com- 
patible with standard battery 
pack) 

and many more. .... 



DJ-S1T/S4T is Simple Type and 
Low-Priced But Offers Features 
such as: 

* 5W Output Power with Optional Bat- 
tery Pack EBP-18N 

" Triple Stage Slective Power Output 
*Dry Cell Battery Case Lock 

* Programmable VFO Range Function 

* Frequency Lock, PTT Lock Function 
•One Touch Squelch De-Activation 

Function 
*8 Scan Modes 

* Wide Band Receiving Range 

Available Features with Optional 
DTMF Unit (DJ-10U) and DTMF Key- 
pad (ESK-1) Include: 

* Pager and Code Squelch 

* Digital Signal Display and Memory 
Function 

'Automatic dialer Function 

* Many Optional Accessories 
Available 

•Specifications 
Frequency Range: 

DJ-F1T/S1T 

TX:144-148MHz 
RX: 140-1 70MHz {AM Mode 
118-136MHZ after Modification) 
DJ-F4T/S4T 
TX:440-450MHz 
RX:430-460MHz 
Output Power: 

* with Battery Pack EBP-16N (Standard 
for F1T/F4T) 

Hi:2W(FlT/SlT) 1.5W(F4T/S4T) 
Mid:1W Low:0.1W 

'with Optional Battery Pack EBP-18N 
Hi:5W Mid:1W Low:0.1W 

* at 9V 
Hi:2.5W(F1T/SlT) 2W(F4T/S4T) 
Mid:1W Low:CL1W 

Weight: 
DJ-F1T/F4TApprox + ;13.2 oz.: 
with Standard Battery Pack 

DJ-S1T/S4T Approx.:i3o2.: 
with Dry Battery case 

Dimensions: 
4.3(H) x 2.1(W) * 1.5(D) in ch 
(Without Projections) 

Specifications and features are guaran- 
teed for amateur bands only and sub- 
ject to change without notice, 

ALINCO ELECTRONICS INC, 

438 AMAPOLA AVE. LOT 130 
TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA 90501 

Phone: 213-618-8616 

FAX : 213-618-8758 

STAY TUNED with 

JHJNC0 

CIRCLE 67 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



A New Amateur Radio Magazine ! 




Here's your chance to subscribe at a 
pre-publication rate to a brand new ham 
publication* The Premiere Issue alone 
should turn out to be worth several times 
the subscription price! The first issue of 
73 is going for hundreds of dollars these 
days. 

The pre-publication subscription price 
is only $9.97 for 12 issues! Not only that, 
but you'll gel at least $25 in discount 
coupons as a bonus. That's right, you'll 
be able to save over double the subscrip- 
tion price when you order from Uncle 
Wayne's Bookshop and other Radio Fun 
supporting advertisers. 

SO, WHAT'S IN IT? 

If we sent you blank pages it would be 

a bargain, so what's the difference? 
Well, if you insist on looking a gift horse 
in the mouth t to coin a phrase, okay. 
here's what's in store for you. 

First out. Radio Fun is aimed at help- 
ing newcomers to amateur radio to both 
get their higher class licenses and to have 
more fun with the tickets they have. This 
means we'll be running simple theory 
articles to help you actually learn how 
electronics and radio work. That's a lot 
better than memorizing the Q&A ba- 
loney and feeling dumb for the rest of 
your life. We're talking simple, so don't 
panic. Much of this will be the same as 
we'll be using to teach 5th-8th grade 
students about electronics and communi- 
cations. 

No, it isn't going to be all theory. The 
name is Radio Fun . so we'll be review- 
ing every kit we can get our hands on. 
The idea is to get you to buy, assemble 
and use all kinds of gadgets - some for 



amateur radio, some not. There's noth- 
ing like building to actually get familiar 
with electronics and turn book theory 
into practical understanding. 

We'll have columns on activities 
which are geared to Novices and Techs. 
We'll be trying to get you involved with 
repeaters, packet radio, SSB on 2m, 
satellite communications, DXing on 
10m, and stuff like that. We'll also be 
urging you to forget how much you hate 
the code and learn it Uncle Wayne's way 
so you can go on to General and Ad- 
vanced tickets. How else can we get you 
upon 15m and 20m so you can help clean 
up the mess the Extras have made of 



those bands? Wc need your help, . .badly. 

Yes, we'll be running stuff on QRP 
(rigs running under one watt), on hidden 
transmitter hunting, on how to cope with 
overbearing old timers at ham club meet- 
ings, on how to find parts, on how to put 
up simple antennas. ..things like that. 

The Premiere Issue will be out in late 
April and the regular monthly issues will 
start in September. If you pass up this 
one youTl never forgive yourself. Jum 
send your order with payment and we'll 
see that you get the big Premiere Issue, a 
wad of discount coupons, and our eternal 
thanks for helping a new ham publication 
get started . —Wayne W2NSD/ ! 



' — I vr ni ( • ,12 issues of Radio Fun ' 

_ Y lio ! Sign me up right now! for $9.97. 



I 



NAME 



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Mail to: Radio Fun; Forest Rd. Hancock, NH 03449 
[Yes, you can call it in via 800-722-7790 or fax it w 603-525-4423 J 

CutaliaJdSI UUphu 70€i5T Foreign j<idl!2(KlMir1<iit VSt* Wjirnuil NewwjrHJMjieSJK ill R^k Sui>vrnp»M*t ftjc SI4 V" Premiere 



Number 1 2 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by David Cassidy N1GPH 



The J*Com MagicNotch 
Audio Filter 



A little box that locks out lids 



J«Com 
P.O. Box 1 94T 
Ben Lomond CA 95005 
TeL (408) 336-3503. 
Price Class: $100, 



Amateur radio is full of gadgets. We have 
gadgets to measure things, gadgets to 
amplify things, gadgets to attenuate things, 
as well as gadgets to help us make other 
gadgets work better. 

Some gadgets end up at the bottom of the 
closet or drawer. They may operate as adver- 
tised, but once you get them installed, you 
realize that what they do is something that 
doesn't really need doing. Other gadgets be- 
come a permanent part of your setup, be- 
cause the manufacturer has solved a particu- 
lar problem. J*Com's MagicNotch audio filter 
lands firmly in the second category. It's a 
simple solution to a very irritating problem: 
interference from a continuous carrier hetero- 
dyne signal (like when someone tunes op on 
top of your QSO), 

The MagicNotch is an automatic notch au- 
dio filter, It requires no tuning, calibration or 
attention of any kind. You simply place it in 
between your rig and an external speaker, 
supply t2 volts, and turn il on. When the 
MagicNotch detects the presence of a contin- 
uous carrier, it filters it out with a very sharp 
notch fitter. Audio of other frequencies, such 
as speech, are unaffected and pass through 
the filter without attenuation 

How It Works 

According to the folks at J»Com, the Magic- 
Notch uses a switched capacitor active filter 
(SCAF), which is scanned through your rig's 
audio output. A control circuit monitors the 
filter's output and stops scanning when it de- 
tects a continuous carrier. The filter then 
locks onto the precise frequency of that carri- 
er and notches it out, tracking the interfering 
signal for any variations in tone until the inter- 
ference disappears. Then the filter re- 
sumes scanning, searching out the next 
offensive carrier. 

On-the-Atr Testing 

Setting up the MagicNotch is easy, and 
J»Com includes power and audio cables. 
The back of the MagicNotch has "audio 
in/ 1 "audio out/' and 12V DC in jacks. 
Connect your rig*s external speaker out- 
put to the "audio in" jack, connect your 
speaker to the "audio out 1 ' jack, connect 
12V DC to the power jack, and you're in 
business. You can use any filtered power 
supply for the 12 vails {maximum current 

40 73 Amateur Radio Today * May. 1991 




is 



at full output is only 200 mA). Many HF rigs 
operate from 1 2 volts, and you may have an 
accessory power jack on your rig, Check your 
rig's owner's manual, I used a small 3 amp 
supply that 1 had sitting around. 

The front of the MagicNotch has a 3-posi- 
tion slide switch, an LED, and a mini head- 
phone jack. When you slide the switch to the 
center position, the MagicNotch is in standby 
mode {labeled "Bypass" on the panel). The 
LED will light green {if you've got it wired cor- 
rect iy). As you tune through the band, the LED 
will flicker to red and back to green. When a 
continuous earner is detected, the LED will 
change to a steady red, indicating that the 
notch filter has locked onto the carrier. In the 
il Bypass" position, you will still hear the inter- 
ference in your speaker. Sliding the switch to 
the "On 11 position will place the fitter in the 
audio tine, and the interfering signal will be 
filtered out. 

To really get a taste of the effectiveness 
of the MagicNotch, leave it in the "Bypass" 
position and tune around for an SSB QSO that 



MagicNotch Specifications 


Notch depth 


40 dB 


Gain 


OdB 


Active range 


200-^000 Hz 


Filter O 


10 


Power output 


2 watts (8D load) 


Power required 


10-14 VDC 


standby 


40 mA 


full output 


200 mA 


Minimum signal for lock 


20 mV P~P 


Maximum signal 


4VP-P 


Audio connectors. 


Q 125" mono phone 


Power connector 


0.220' coaxial 


Size 


5.5- x 3" x 1.25* 



be- 
ing interfered 
with by someone tuning 
up. Switch the MagicNotch to the 
"On" position and the tuner-upper is gone, 
leaving only the SSB signal. No matter how 
weak the SSB signal is, or how strong the C W 
carrier is. the MagicNotch will eliminate the 
interference and leave the SSB signal intact. 
Now, when a lid tries to tune up on top of 
your QSO. a simple flick of the switch and the 
lid is gone. If you Jeave the MagicNotch in the 
"On" position, you'll never even know the lid 
was there. 

Be sure to switch the MagicNotch to "By- 
pass" or "Off" when you want to monitor CW. 
The filter may notch out what you're trying to 
copy! 

Nice Touches 

The MagicNotch is an example of a product 
that is designed to do a specific task, and it 
does that very well. 

The short instruction manual is well written 
and informative. The inclusion of the power 
and audio cables in the purchase price is a 
courteous and convenient gesture that other 
companies would do well to imitate. 
The front panel headphone jack is a mini- 
stereo jack that allows you to use the head- 
phones from your portable stereo/tape 
player. If you've ever spent all day with a 
large set of headphones clamped to your 
head, you'll appreciate being able to use 
lightweight headphones for a change. 
Some might question the frequency re- 
sponse of headphones intended tor music 
listening used for communications, but I 
like the more balanced tone of a stereo 
headphone. 

In a hobby full of gadgets. it's nice to find 
one that is a useful addition to your shack. 
The MagicNotch is just such a gadget. \ 
call it my "lid fiHer" 



«■ 




RF POWER AMPLIFIERS 



400 



WATTS 

(144-148 MHz) 



TE SYSTEMS new HPA Series ol high power 

amplifiers now available through select national 
distributors. 

All amplifiers are linear (all-mode), automatic 
T/R switching, and incorporate optional GaAs 
FET preamp. Amps are usable with a wide in- 
put drive level range. Thermal shutdown protec- 
tion and remote control capability included. All 
units are designed to I CAS ratings and meet 
FCC part 97 regulations. Approx. size is 2.8 x 
10 x 115" and weight is 8 lbs. 

Consult your local dealer or send directly for 
further product information. 



TE SYSTEMS 

P.O. Bo* 25845 

Los Angeies, CA 90025 

<213)47&<I59T 





SPECIFICATIONS 



Model 



0550G 



0552G 



1450G 



1452G 



Freq* ■ Power Preamp DC Power RF 

MHz Input Output NF-dB Gain-dB +Vdc A Conn 



50-54 



50-54 



144-148 



144-148 



400 



400 



400 



400 



2252 G 


220-225 


25 


220 


4450G 


420*450 


10 


175 


4452G 


420-450 


25 


175 




^H^^H 




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UHF 



UHF 



UHF 
UHF 



UHF 



13.6 



13.6 



136 
13.6 



13.6 



136 



■3 £ 



Models also available without GaAs FET preamp (delete G suffix on model #). All units 
cover lull amateur band - specify 10 MHz bandwidth for 420-450 MHz amplifier. Con- 
tinuous duty repeater amps also available. 

Amplifier capabililies; 100-200 MHz t 225-400 MHz, 1-2 GHz, Military (28V). Commercial, 
etc. also available - consult factory. 



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ELECTRONIC DISTRIBUTORS CO. 

325 Mill Street • Vienna • VA 22180 

Ph 703-938-8105 

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For more information contact your local deat&r 




CLP51 30-1 Log Periodic 50-1300 MHz 



This high gain, 
wide-band VHF and UHF 
antenna is suitable 
for amateur radio, FM 
broadcasting, scanning, 
VHRUHF television, 
government applications 
and business band use, 




Boom length 

5'9' ( VSWR2 J 0:l 

or less. max. element 

length 9 '10 \ weigh! 11 lbs.. 

wind survival 90 mpn 

Assembly of this antenna 

is quick and easy, A model 

CLP5130-2 (105-1300 MHz) Is 

available as well 



ROOF TOWERS: 



Modal 


Heigh i 


Base Width 


Max. Wind Load FT- 


Max Vert load Lb*. 


Weight 


cma 


5 10' 


31 . 


21 tf 90 mpft 


440 


tS 


CF130 


9 ' 10 k 


39" 


2? in 90 mph 


1,322 


3:3 


CR45 


14 J 9* 


39" 


23#90mph 


881 


57 



CK46Thryst Bearing— Max, Mas! Diameter 2% 




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Rotation Torque 


Brake Torque 




Q Model 


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{tbsJinchl 


Mast Size 


T RC5-T 


550 


6075 


lV-2^" 


q RC5-3 
" RC5A-2 


520 


607S 


1V-2V*- 


1383 


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R RC5A 3 


1388 


13,020 


1%**2W 



Vert Ice I Load 
flbeJ 



Horizontal 

Load {lbs.) Preset 



RC5-1 
RC5-3 
HC5A-2 
RC5A3 



BSD 



1540 
1540 



1760 
1760 
2200 
2200 



Provided 
Provided 



Indicator 
Accuracy 



= 5- Ma* 

+ 4° Max 
±4»Max 
±4 A Max 



I Weight (lbs.) 
Square Feel (Ro1ator Unit) 



10 
10 
2S 

25 



13 
13 

17 
17 




Mt*' 



PT 



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POWER SUPPLIES 

PS304 30A 

PS140I! 14A 

RS40X 40A 

RS3080 30A 



13 lbs. 
11 lbs. 
22 lbs. 
continuous 
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20 lbs. 



DIGITAL SWR/PWR MTRS 
DP810 1.8-150 MHz 
DPB20 140-525 MHz 
DP830 1.8-150 MHz 
140-525 MHz 

SWR/PWR MTRS W/PEP 
CN101 1.8-150 MHz 
CN102 140-525 MHz 



■V* 



JIEVflO 




The ultimate wide-band omnidirectional 
antenna for hours of listening pleasure. 
Not only a great receiving antenna, 
it can transmit on 50 MHz, 144 MHz, 
430 MHz, 900 MHz and 1200 MHz. 
Stainless steel materials com- 
plete with mounting hardware. 
Type ^N" connectors. Only 
5 f 6 * tall which enables 
Indoor Installations for 
apartment dwellers. 

WB 1300 
Frequency: 

Receive— 25-1300 MHz 

Transmit— 50, 144, 430, 900 
& 1200 MHz 
Max. Pwr:200W 
Length: 5 6 " 
Connector "M" Type 
MaslDia.:.9a'-2* 
Weight: 2.2 lbs 



Number 1 3 on your feedback card 



Apartment Antennas 

A Challenge 

How to cope with a less-than-ideal QTH. 



byStanGibiliscoWlGV 



I recently moved into an apartment com- 
plex where outdoor antennas are not al- 
lowed. This predicament is not unfamiliar to 
radio hams and shortwave listeners. It does 
not have to mean a Low-performance station, 
but it inevitably means that there must be 
some compromises. A full-size, 4-elemcm. 
40 meter yagi, and other such antennas, are 
out of the question. 

Here are some of the schemes I have tried 
so far, and some ideas for future experimen- 
tation. I can always go back lo my parents* 
house on the hill to work contests and DX, 
and this is the attitude I carried into the new 
apartment. 

Survey the Layout 

Whatever your particular situation, you 
will immediately see some obvious possibili- 
ties for antennas if you take the time to look 
things over. 

My apartment is on the third floor of a 
three-story complex. My main motivation for 
choosing this location was noise: No one will 
be clomping around above me all day and all 
night. It turned out to be good from a ham 
radio standpoint, too. The ceiling is 30 feet 
above the ground. The building is old, and is 
therefore probably not of the solid concrete- 
and -steel Faraday- shield construction typical 
of newer high-rise complexes. There is a fire 
escape right outside the living room window, 
a formidable mass of metal that ought to make 
an excellent ground for a high-impedance 
antenna system. 

The point is that any apartment will have 
some redeeming properties for radio commu- 
nications, Well, almost any. Perhaps my 
friend who used to live in Arlington, Virgin- 
ia, had just about the worst deal 1 have ever 
seen, a low Roar in a jungle of tall buildings. 
Evidently hamming was not high on his list of 
priorities. 

Any apartment living arrangement pre- 
sents the danger of RFI and it is far better to 
put extra effort into the antenna system than 
to attempt to overcome a deficiency by run- 
ning high power* I prefer not to get into wars 
with my neighbors. I 'd just as soon have them 
never suspect I am a radio ham and never 
have any interference from me. With this in 
mind, 1 kept in mind the corollary to the 
antenna restriction: If you never get caught 
with an outdoor antenna, then, in effect, you 
don't have one as far as the management is 
concerned* 



ANTEUNA 




<*** wave *■"£ 



TRAMSUATC" 




RADIO 



Figure L Installation of a i4 wavelength "ra- 
dial ' ' wire as an RF ground. The wire shotdd 
be as straight as possible, and the far end left 

free. 



\ 


-<M-WAVt WIRES 


^y 




TRAftiSltATCH 




1 




HAOIO 







Figure 2. When a (4 -wave, end-fed wire an- 
tenna is used with a f 4 -wave ground lead, the 
result is a tenter-fed dipole antenna. In this 
case the 4 * radial ' * contributes to the radiation 
of the antenna system. 



BUTTON 



AHTENMA WIRE 






o 




support wire: 



Figure J, A button may be used as an insula- 
tor for "invisible, '* low-power antennas* 

This last statement is not intended as an 
encouragement to break the rules of your 
lease. You do that at your own risk. If you 
try it and get into trouble. I shun all responsi- 
bility. 

Establishing Ground 

I cannot overemphasize the importance of 
obtaining a good ground for radio-frequency 



communication, A good direct-current (DC) 
ground is not necessarily a good radio- fre- 
quency |RF) ground. 

The term "RF ground" is somewhat nebu- 
lous. A good ground at one frequency may be 
terrible at another frequency, The type of 
antenna being used makes a great difference. 

If the ground loss resistance is given by Rl 
and the antenna input radiation resistance is 
given by Rr, then the efficiency of the ground 
system is given by: 

Eff(%) = 1Q0*IV(R R + R L ) 

The higher Rr is, compared to Rl, the 
higher the efficiency of the ground system. 
End-fed antennas measuring an integral mul- 
tiple of 1 :2 wavelength tend to have very high 
values of Rk and are therefore best for use 
when the RF ground is marginal—and in an 
apartment situation, it almost always is mar- 
ginal, at best. 

You can get a good RF ground by installing 
a quarter-wavelength wire at the station 
transmatch or transmitter chassis, as shown 
in Figure 1. This will produce high current, 
and therefore low resistance, at the operat- 
ing frequency, and also at odd integral multi- 
ples of this frequency. Such a ** radial* 
ground wire will radiate to some extent, but 
this is minimal when the antenna feedpoint 
resistance is very high. If the antenna is a 
quarter-wave wire with a rather low feed- 
point resistance, the arrangement will com- 
bine with the antenna to form a dipole having 
a feeder length of zero (Figure 2). This ar- 
rangement will still function quite well. For 
multiband operation, multiple "radiate* 1 can 
be installed, each cut to W wavelength at the 
center of the desired band according to the 
equation: 

Ufcet) - 240/f(MHz) 

where L is the length of the ground lead and f 
is the frequency. The far ends of these **radi- 
als* ' are left free, not connected to any object, 
MFJ Enterprises, Inc., makes a tuner de- 
signed especially for resonating an RF 
ground. According to a QST review, this 
device works quite well . 

The Transmatch 

I have mentioned the use of a transmatch 
almost as if it were given that you have one. It 

ought to be; transmatches are indispensable 



42 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 







HF Eg 

IC-765 Xcvr/ps/keyer/auto luner. 



Regular SALE 
.„ 3149.00 CALL 




IC-781 Xcvr/Rcvr/pVtuner/seone™ 6149 CALL 




IC-751A 9 band xcvr/.l-30 MHz rcvr 1699,00 1399 

PS-35 Internal power supply 219,00 L99 95 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF)..... 59.00 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF).... 115,00 109 ss 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF).... 115.00 109 s * 

FL-70 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter 59,00 




IC-735 Hf xcvr/SW rcvr/mic 

P5-55 External power supply ..„, 
AT-150 Automatic antenna tuner . 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit 

UT-30 Tone encoder.... 

IC-725 HFxcvr/SWrcvr.., 
AH-3 Automatic antenna tuner ... 

IC-726 10-bartdiGvr/6m.... 



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• 






1C-2KL Hf solid state amp w/ps 

IC4KL HF IKWouts/sampw/ps 

EX-627 HF auto. ant. selector (Sp&iif) 
PS-15 20A external power supply ...... 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord. 6-pin plug 

SP-3 External speaker 

SP-7 Small external speaker 

CR-64 High stab, ret xtafc 751 A, etc ... 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

SM-8 Desk mic -two cables, scan 

AT-500 500W 9-band auto ant. tuner 
AH-2 SbanrJ tuner w/mount & whip,., 
AH-2A Ant tuner system, only (Speekf) 



Regular 

1999.00 

6995,00 

315.00 

175,00 

349.00 

65.00 

51.99 

79.00 

47.95 

89.00 

589.00 

753.00 

559 00 



SALE 
1699 

CALL 
269 95 
159 s * 
319 ? * 



519" 
689" 
469" 



Accessories for IC-765/781/725 • Call for Prices 



ICOM 



* Large Stocks 

* Fast Service 

* Top Trades 




VHF Hf Base Trans ~ Regular 

IC-275A 25w2mFNl/SSB/CWw/ps,„ 1299.00 

IC-275H 100w2m FM/SSS/CW 1399.00 

IC-475A 25w 440 FM/SS8/CW w/ps it* 1399.00 
JC-475H lOOw 440 FM/SSB/Cwr^#e> 159900 
IC-575A 25*6/ 10m *cvr/p$ (St*&) 1399.00 
IC 575H 25w 1D0* 6/lOm xcvr 1699.00 



SALE 
1129 
1199 
1199 
1269 
1099 
1469 




IC229A 25w2mFM/nPmiC„ 

IC229H 50w 2m FM/TTP mic 

IC 448A 25w 440 FWTTF ... fChseout) 

0\ s 

IC-3220A 25w 2m/440 FM/TTP mic... 
IC-3220H 45w 2m/35w 440 FM/TTP 

IC-240OA 2m/440 FM/TTP 

IC-2500A 35w440/1.2GHz FM„_„. t 



Regular Sale 
449,00 CALL 
479.00 CALL 

599.00 499" 
Regular Sale 
659.00 569" 
699,00 599" 

899.00 CALL 
999.00 CALL 




nand FiV .er 

IC-901 2m/440 Fiber opt. xcvr „„„.„. 
UX-R91A Broadband recover unrt.„ 

UX-19A lOw 10m unit 

UX-59A IOwfimunit 

UX-S92A 2m SSB/CW module 

UX-39A 25w 220MHz unit (Special) 
UX-S94A 430 SSB/CW module...... 

UX-129A lDw 12GHz unit.... 



IHF Mc 






IC-970A 25w2m/430 MHz transceiver 

IC-970H 45w 2m/430 MHz transceiver 

UX-R96 50-905 Mhz receive umt.... 

^bile Anli • t .r\A 
AH-32 2m/44Q Dual Band mobile ant 

AKB-32 Trunk-lip mount 

Larsen PO-K Roof mount 

Larsen PQTLJI Trunk-lrp mount 

Larsen PQ-MM Magnetic mount 






RP-1510 2m 25w repeater 

RP 2210 220MHz 25w rpfr ... ftps 

RP-4020 440MHz 25w repeater 

RP 1220 12GHz I Ow repeater 



I ■* I * 4 ■ i- « 



r m t i I ■« 





Regular 
1199.00 CALL 
389.00 CALL 
299.00 269- 
349.00 319" 
599.00 CALL 
349.00 279" 

TBA 

549.00 499" 

Regular Sale 

2895.00 2499 

3149 2699 

389.00 349" 

Regular Sale 

39.00 

35.00 

23.00 

2470 

28.75 
Regular Sale 
1849.00 1649 
1649.00 1399 
229900 1999 
2599.00 2249 



Use your 

CREDIT 
CARD 






i 



© 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



I 



T 




Ma; i os Regular SALE 

IC-02AT/High Power 409.00 349" 
IC^04AT440^/w*Wf J J 449.00 329" 

IC-2SA 2m HT 41900 CALL 

IC-2SAT 2m/TP 439.00 CALL 



IC-3SAT 220 HT/TTP 
IC-4SAT 440 HT/TTP 

IC 2GAT 2m HT/TTP 
IC 4GAT 440MHz, TIP 

IC-32AT 2m/440 */* 
IC-24AT 2m/440 HT 



449 00 369" 
449,00 CALL 

429.00 CALL 
449.00 CALL 

629.00 549" 
629.00 CALL 



limited OthtL, FREE BP 82 external 7.2V @ 

300ma. battery with IC 3SAT puchase. 



rcrafl band handhelc Regular SALE 

A-2 5W PEP synth. aircraft HT._, 525 00 479" 

A-20 Synth aircraft HT w/VOR (Spec.) 625.00 499" 
For HT Accessories • CALL for Prices 



+****#*■ 



R-71A 100kHz-30MHzrcvr 

RC41 Infrared remote controller. 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW fHter 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) .. 
FL-44A S$B filter (2nd IF].. ....... 

EX-257 FM unit 

FX-310 Voice synthesizer,.,. 

CR-64 Higti stability oscillator xtal 

SP-3 ExtemaJ speaker 

CK-70(EX 2t9J 12V DC option.... 
W8-12 Mobile mounL ..„__. 



Regular SALE 
$999.00 CALL 

70.99 

69.00 

59.00 
178.00159" 

49,00 

59.00 

79.00 

65.00 

12.99 

25.99 




R-7000 25MHz-2GHz receiver 

RC-12 Infrared remote controller... 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

TVR7000 ATVumt. 



............. 



1199.00 1029 
70.99 
59.00 
139.00 129" 




R-9O0Q 100KHz-2GHz alUmode rcvr .,. 5459.00 4G99 



Due to the size of the ICOM product line, some 
accessory items are not listed. If you have a question, 
please call. Prices subject to change without notice. 



Top Trades ! • Well take your 
Clean Late Model gear in trade 
towards New ICOM Equipment 

Write or Call lor our Quote Today! 



[ it (he* 34 Yern k Amtew Radio 
HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat. 9-3 



FAX: (414) 358-3337 



T 



01 



Inc. 



5710 W. Good Hope Road; Milwaukee, Wl 53223 • Phone (414) 358-0333 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 
28940 Euclid Avenue 
Phone (216) 585-7388 

1-800-321-3594 



BRANCH STORES cH.cMo^r^o 

ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER. Fla. 34625 LAS VEGAS. Nev. 89106 ERfCKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 1898 Drew Street 1072 H. Rancho Drrve 5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (407) 894-3238 Phone (813) 461-4267 Phone (702) 647 3114 Phone (312) 631-5181 

1-800-327-1917 No Toll Free Line 1-800-634-6227 1-800-621-5802 



621 Commonwealth Ave. 
Phone (407) 894-3238 

1-800-327-1917 



imm 



for apartment dwellers and any radio ham 
who operates portable very often. The added 
versatility is well worth the cost of the device. 

The best transmatches allow fortuning ran- 
dom wires and balanced feeders. Most mod- 
ern transmatches employ ferrite balun trans- 
formers to obtain tuning for balanced antenna 
systems. This is fine as long as the core does 
not saturate during transmission, Depending 
on the impedance at the feedpoint, the core 
may saturate at power levels much lower than 
that specified by the manufacturer for opera- 
tion of the transmatch. I have actually 
cracked a ferrite balun core using 500 watts 
output when the transmaich specifications 
stated that it was usable up to 3 kW. This 
same transmaich became quite hot during op- 
eration using 500 watts output and an unbal- 
anced %-wave wire at 1 .8 MHz, The choice 
of a transmatch is obviously important. In 
general, those with very large components 
will be better suited for high power (more 
than 200 watts output) than those with smaller 
components, even if the latter carry impres- 
sive specifications. Certain laws of nature 
will not yield to miniaturization technology— 
not until we have superconductor coils and 
cryogenic vacuum-variable capacitors! 

The main advantage of a transmatch is that 
it allows practically any antenna to be res- 
onated. You should choose the antenna with 
efficiency in mind, regardless of the avail- 
ability of a tuner, but high-impedance anten- 
nas, the kind that work best with marginal 
grounds, generally require a tuner to produce 
an acceptable standing-wave ratio (SWR). 

A Simple End-Fed Wire 

Perhaps the simplest antenna is an end-fed 
wire, running directly to the output of the 
transmatch and cut so thai it is an integral 
multiple of x h wavelength on all of the desired 
transmitting bands. In amateur radio at high 
frequencies the bands are harmonically relat- 
ed, so if an antenna is cut to be Vi wavelength 
at SO meters it will be close to an integral 
multiple thereof at 40, 30, 20, 15 and 10 
meters. 

Outdoor antennas are often not allowed, 
but a thin wire, three stories above the 
ground, is difficult to see. I recommend 
enameled copper wire of American wire 
gauge (AWG) No. 24 or smaller, down to 
AWG No, 30. The larger wires are physical- 
ly stronger but more likely to be seen; the 
finer wires are more likely to break. Don't 
string such an antenna where it 
might cause problems for people if it 
breaks. Keep in mind, also, that if 
there Ls a frost, an ''invisible" an- 
tenna may greet you some morning 
with an announcement to the world 
almost comparable to reveille. 

The far end of a thin wire antenna 
may be tied to a button as an insula* 
tor. as shown in Figure 3. Allow 
plenty of slack for the wire to swing 
with the wind. A strong tree branch 
is atl right for the tar end of the 
antenna, but a solid, stable object is 
superior since it will not move in a 
wind. Avoid stringing the wire 



fh 



RADIO 



~ 



"A^SVATXH 



INTEGRAL MULTIPLE 
Of \*Z WAVE (_£T*&TH 



"1 



P= W 



■>AftAU_£L + WlRE LIKE 



ANT£ 



RADIO 



COAHAt LINE 



j. -it 




TRANSMATCH 



& 



Figure 4. In drawing "a," a parallel -wire 
feedline is used with an end-fed wire that is 
very close to an integral multiple of fS wave- 
length. In hi b,' the transmatch is located 
some distance from the transmitter, and the 
antenna is end-fed through the transmatch. 




LOOP AT CEILING 



RADIO 







'VIRES BHQuGrtT DOWN 
AS f EEDCR5 



TRANSMATCH 



Figure 5. An indoor loop may be fed by bring- 
ing the wires down from the ceiling, parallel 
to each other, to the balanced output of the 

transmatch. 

over or under utility wires. Table I gives 
good lengths for wires for various lowest 
amateur bands. 

For shortwave listening the length is less 
critical, since antenna efficiency is not as 
important Generally, a length of at least 50 
feet will suffice, although longer wires are 
recommended for listening below the 160 
meter ( 1 ,8 MHz) amateur band, and at long- 
wave frequencies, length should be as great 
as can be managed. 

The disadvantage of an end-fed wire is that 
the radiating portion of the antenna comes 



Table 1 . Lengths of wire antennas (end-fed) for half-wave opera- 
tion at various amateur bands. The bands are indicated in me- 
ters, with the lowest frequency band first, Half-wave resonant 
frequencies are given in MHz, and represent the centers of the 
lowest bands- 



Bands 
of Operation 

160.80.40,30,20,15.10 

80. 40, 30. 20, 15 T 10 

40,20,15,10 

30,15,10 

20,10 



Resonant 
Frequency 

1,900 

3.750 

7.150 
10,125 
14.175 



Wire Length 
Feet Meters 



246 

125 

65 

46 

33 



right down to the station. However, in an 
apartment situation where the landlord will 
not allow rooftop antennas, long feedlines are 
impractical anyway. If the station must be 
located away from the window where the 
antenna comes in, then a parallel -wire line 
may be used and the antenna connected to one 
end of this line. However, the antenna must 
be very close to an integral multiple of } A 
wavelength to avoid line radiation (Figure 
4a). Alternatively, you can run coaxial cable 
from the transmitter to the feedpoint, then 
connect the tuner to the antenna and RF 
ground at this remote point (Figure 4b), This 
is inconvenient when it comes to changing 
bands, but it is the best alternative in some 
cases. The RF ground must be connected and 
effective at the transmatch when this scheme 
is used. 

An Indoor Loop 

Simple end-fed wires may be connected for 
use indoors, although the lengths may vary 
somewhat when the wires are not straight. 
For indoor antennas, a balanced loop is prob- 
ably better than an end-fed antenna. 

Basically, the loop antenna always presents 
a balanced load at the input. This eliminates 
the need for a good RF ground and also gets 
rid of frequency sensitivity. The loop should 
be at least Vi wavelength, and preferably at 
least one wavelength, in circumference. 

My apartment is quite large, and the ceiling 
is about 30 feet above ground level, An in- 
door loop, run around the entire apartment at 
the ceiling level, was an obvious choice. I 
installed this antenna almost before 1 got all 
the furniture in and the bed made up. I found 
stranded, insulated AWG No. 20 wire at a 
surplus shop for a few dollars. Hamfests are 
great places to get wire like this. I connected 
the loop to the balanced terminals of the an- 
tenna tuner, without regard to the overall 
length of the Loop: I knew only that it was at 
least 100 feet in circumference, and close to a 
full wavelength at 7 MHz. I did the tuning on 
all bands, 80 through 10 meters, and logged 
the transmatch settings for future reference. 

The loop was fed by bringing the end wires 
down parallel to each other, as shown in 
Figure 5, 

Separate Receiving Antennas 

Indoor antennas, and any antenna in a pop- 
ulation-dense place like an apartment build- 
ing, will pick up considerable man-made 
noise. The noise blanker on my FT- 
10 1 EE is effective against much of 
this noise, but some broad-spiked 
noise is difficult to suppress with 
any noise blanker. In some cases a 
special receiving antenna may be 
needed. 

A small loop with a tunable 
preamplifier is an asset in noisy 
places. The loop should be rotat- 
able in both the vertical and hori- 
zontal planes, allowing you to find 
the noise null. It can be exasper- 
ating when there is more than one 
noise source and they keep al- 
ternating; the loop may need 



75,1 

38.0 
19.9 
14,1 
10.1 



44 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



frequent adjustment, The subject of receiving 
loops is complex and is beyond the scope of 
this article. However, Doug DeMaw W1FB 
has written numerous articles in QST about 
receiving loops. 

Commercially-manufactured receiving 
loop antennas are available. Palornar Engi- 
neers manufactures one that has a preamplifi- 
er and a ferrite loopsiick that can be rotated in 
both the vertical and horizontal planes. 

A separate receiving antenna is, of course, 
necessary only for ham stations in which 
there is also a transmitter. When a separate 
antenna is used for receiving , precautions 
must be taken to ensure that the signal from 
the transmitter does not damage the receiver 
front end or the preamplifier. Some pream- 
plifiers have protection built in. Some don't. 
Protection mav not be necessary at low levels 
of transmitter power, but it is always a good 

idea. 

That Gremlin: RFI 

Radio-frequency interference (RFI) is so 
common nowadays that, unless you are run- 
ning milliwatts or are extremely fortunate, 
you will encounter it in an apartment situa- 
tion. There are video tape machines, low -cost 
hi-fi and television receivers, and all kinds of 
other devices that are susceptible to interfer- 
ence from amateur radio signals. It seems that 
the problem has multiplied in recent years 
because of two factors: the greater number of 
susceptible devices, and the general neglect 
of manufacturers when it comes to protection 
from strong electromagnetic fields. 

The RFI problem takes a different, re- 
versed form when consumer devices inter- 
fere with the radio amateur's communica- 
tions. Home computers are notorious for this. 
Other devices, such as cordless telephones, 
can cause trouble as well. It seems that a 
double standard applies in the public mind for 
RFI: It's all right if the radio ham gels inter- 
fered with by a consumer device, but it's a 
cosmic catastrophe if it happens the other 
way around. It is not my place to say whether 
or not soap operas and video games are more 
important than radio communications of a 
hobby nature, but radio amateurs have to be 
prepared to face the facts. 

In the event of a confrontation with neigh- 
bors, the American Radio Relay League, 225 
Main Street, Newington CT 06111, (203) 
666-1541, may be of assistance. They are 
familiar with legal cases that have occurred as 
a result of RFI, 

My own attitude is that 1 won't operate if it 
interferes with some other person's activi- 
ties. 1 don't consider myself that serious an 
operator. I'll reduce power or operate when 
nobody else is awake. But not everyone 
shares this tempered, retiring view, The most 
the ham can do is be certain that his transmit- 
ted signal is **clean** — free of harmonics or 
other defects in quality— and that he is run- 
ning no more power than is necessary to carry 
out the given communications. This power 
issue is often overlooked: We hams tend to 
run more power than we need, most of the 
time. Apartment dwellers must keep con- 
straints such as this in mind. 



Many RFI problems can be cleared up by 
the installation of such things as line filters, 
better grounds, or different antenna systems. 
An indoor antenna is more Likely to cause 
RFI than an outdoor one. There is some 
evidence to suggest that vertically-polarized 
antennas are more RFl-prone than horizon- 
tally-polarized antennas. A two- wire line 
must be kept in proper balance; a coaxial line 
must be free of "antenna currents 1 on the 
shield, 

Further Ideas 

The outdoor "invisible" end- fed wire and 
the indoor loop are the two antennas I have 
tried so far- Of course, there are other possi- 
bilities. A balanced 'invisible** dipole, actu- 
ally a shortened random V beam, is another 
scheme that might lend itself to my situation. 
This would be a set of two end-fed random 
wires, each of the same length, connected to 
opposite poles of the balanced transmatch 
output, Such an antenna would require no RF 
ground and would be balanced over a wide 
range of operating frequencies. 

Perhaps the most interesting idea must wait 
until those long, cold winter nights, when the 
1.8 MHz band comes to life. I find it hard to 
resist this band during those times. I figure if 
I'm not partying in Miami on those winter 
nights, the next best thing is a good cup of hot 
chocolate and an efficient antenna for 160 
meters. I have used balloons and aluminum 
welding wire to make fiiil-size "vertical" 
antennas of X A wavelength and longer on this 
band. Depending on the proximity of the util- 
ity lines, a scaled-down version of this idea 
might be used in an apartment {Ed Note: Not 
recommended for apartment dwellers, it's 
best to try this in the wide-open spaces of the 
country. If you try this idea, make sure you 
are more than the length of your antenna wire 
away from any power lines, and don r t try this 
on a windy night!}. The balloon would have 
to be dark, so that it could not be easily seen at 
night, and it would have to be small enough to 
fit through the open window. Then there's the 
problem of getting the gas cylinder up three 
flights of stairs without provoking questions 
or gearing a hernia, But, as the saying goes, 
when there's desire, there's no limit to what 
one can do. For a radio ham fond of the 1 .& 
MHz band, winters in the Upper Midwest 
have a way of cultivating desire, Let's see: a 
pound of that wire alloy 5356 with a 0.030- 
inch diameter is about 1 T 250 feet, so l A wave 
at 1.8 MHz, about 125 feet, would be only 
0.1 pound, or 1,6 ounces. A 24-inch balloon 
would easily lift that, and ought to fit through 
the window with a little effort. Of course* 
Vd have to have the lights off so no one would 
see me climbing out onto the fire escape at 
midnight in below-zero weather with this 
two- foot balloon, but that's no problem. A 
little sign on the windowpane could remind 
me to switch off the lights before going 
out. . 



Natural Voice Products 




Repealer Identifier* 
Coolest Stations 
Site Alarms 
Remote Telemrf ry 
Weather Station* 
Multiple LflRguuKL's 
Emergency 
Announcement* 



DataVoice - DV-64 

Add a Recorded Noturtd Voice to your system or equipment 
Voira vocabularies or multiply phrases up to 1 minute in a 
Natural Voice is saved in Non-Votaiile E-Prom memory.(tf 
power is removed, the recordings will not be lost). Well 
record yotir mei&agets) in a male or female voice - or- you can 
record the library by using the- optional SDS-1000 develop- 
ment board on an IBM or compatible computer. 

Parallel Input Word Select 8 ohm Audio output 

500 ma Kcyline Output 600 ohm Audio output 

31 Kb sampling rale +*v to + 14v Supply 

M u 1 1 i pie Modes Size : 4.00" x 425* 

Selectable Timing Connectors Included 

Price $ 169.00 Single Qty (programmed) 

Palornar Telecom, Inc. 

2250 N. Iris Lane - Escondido. Ca. 92026 

(619) 746-7998 



CIRCLE 1&9 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Repeater - Link Controller 




RBC-700 Controller 

The RBC-700 represents ihe latest generation of advanced 
repealer controllers. The&c series of controllers can connect 
up io 7 independent receivers and transmitters, 24 different 
configurations are available thai supports up to 5 fu I ty du- 
plexed link radios* 4- independent remote base radios, and 
multiple repeaters simultaneously. Card-cage design allows 
expansion by simply adding, cards and firmware. A true 7 
position cross-point switch is utilized that allows each receiver 
/ transmitter to independently connect to other Ux/Tx com* 
binatiotis as desired. Multiple independent Rk/Ti paths art 
supported. 

Multiple Repeater control E**7 **rvking 

Up to 5 Duplexed Links Iniergraicd Autoptttch 

Up to 4 difTennl Remotes + I0v to + I4v Supply 

Nat urw 3 Speec h Te le mel ry Sim : S2F x 19' &* 

Card -Cane design Expand *! ™y lirae 

Call for further details 

Palornar Telecom, Inc. 

2250 NL Iris Line - Escondido, Ca. 92026 

(619) 746-7998 



CIRCLE 264 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Contact Stan Gibilisco W1GV at 871 S. 
Cleveland Avenue, Apt. P-12, St. Paul MN 
55116. 



TEN-TEC PARAGON OWNERS 

Upgrade your Paragon with the Giehl 
Electronics Software Enhancement Kit. 

YOU GET THESE FEATURES: 

• Band registers that store the last used 
frequency, mode, and filter for all HF ham 
bands 160 through 10 meters 

• A 10 Minute ID reminder 

• Single key band selection 

■ 5 different VFO tuning rates 

• Dual VFO offsets and simultaneous Rx 
and Tx offsets 

• Up and Down keys selectable between 
IMHz/IOOkHz or 5kHz/10kHz 

■ Retention of last memory channel number 

• Installs in 10 minutes with no soldering 

• Many other enhancements 

The kit includes the software chip and 
complete documentation for your manual. 
Cost is $72.00 plus $3.00 shipping and 
handling . Send check or money order to: 

Giehl Electronics 

P.O. Box 18335, Cincinnati. Ohio 45218 






CIRCLE 282 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1991 45 



Number 1 4 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Dick Goodman WA3USG 



The SR3 Simplex 

Repeater from 

Brainstorm Engineering 

Versatile storeand-forward voice controller. 



Bratn storm Engineering 

3170 Beaudry Terrace 

GlendaleCA 91208 

(818)249-4383 

Price Class: $330 with PL decoder 

installed; $230 without PL decoder, 



The concept of a "simplex repeater" is 
quite simple, Jt is a voice store-and-for- 
ward device very similar to a packet 
digipeater Additional hardware requirement 
are minimal — only one standard voice-grade 
radio and antenna is required tor operation. 
The primary advantage to this type of repeater 
is in its simplicity. There are no duplexers, 
multiple antennas, external receivers, or aux- 
iliary equipment needed. It can be installed in 
an automobile using an existing transceiver, 
driven to a h*gh location, and put into opera- 
tion immediately. It may even be used with a 
handie-talkie to provide portable repeater ca- 
pabilities in a package considerably smaller 
than 1 cubic foot. 

Sounds too good to be true, doesn't it? Well, 
it has a few disadvantages over a convention- 
al repeater. Since il uses a single radio chan- 
nel, it is a "hatf-duplex H device, The user keys 
his or her transceiver, speaks for a limited 
period of time, unkeys the transceiver, then 
hears the message repeated. The person that 
the user is communicating with would also 
hear this message and respond in the same 
manner. It's not really conducive to rag-chew- 
ing, but it is quite practical for applications 



POWER 

ON 



KISK 



PTT OTW li>LH 5R OR 



SR3 



Brainstorm 
Engineering 



tfMKLBX liE-KBATlIi 



Gleiuhle. CA 



Photo A. The Brainstorm Engineering SR3 Simplex Repeater 



where one or more people need to communis 
cate but are out of range of each other. The 
simplex repeater can be centrally located, al- 
lowing everyone to communicate through it. 

Until recently, simplex repeaters used 
either endless tape loops or standard cassette 
tapes as the voice storage media. White the 
user transmitted, the tape transport recorded 
the transmission. As long as the user had 
the transmitter keyed, the tape ran. When 
the transmitter was unfceyed. the transport 
went into a "rewind" mode, rewound the tape, 
and replayed the message. This caused a de- 
lay in repeating the original message, and it 
was a mechanically complex operation sub- 
ject to problems With the availability of inex- 
pensive voice digitizing and storage devices, 
this inherent mechanical problem has been 
solved. 




Photo B. Inside view of the SR3. 
46 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



Enter the Brainstorm Engineering SR3 
Simplex Repeater 

The Brainstorm SR3 is packaged in a stur- 
dy, all-metal case that you could almost drive 
a car over. Its dimensions are: 10,5" wide, 6" 
deep, and 1.75" high. It performs all the func- 
tions of a simplex repeater with none of the 
problems of the older, mechanical units. The 
power requirements are 11.6 to 15 VDC at 
approximately 200 mA. As well as functioning 
as a simplex repeater, it serves as a simple 
voice mailbox system, and a voice repeater 
IDer. All modes of operation can be controlled 
by DTMF tones, 

The documentation that comes with the 
SR3 is excellent. It includes clear and concise 
specifications, operating instructions, and 
configuration data. The block schematics and 
circuit board layouts are high quality line 
drawings that are easy to read and will enable 
virtually anyone to interface the SR3 to a vari- 
ety of radios. 

Configuration, Setup and Operation 

The front panel of the SR3 is simple and 
uncluttered. There are five "status" LEDs, 
and a power switch. All input and output to the 
SR3. including power, is via a DB-25 connec- 
tor located on the rear panel. Brainstorm Engi- 
neering includes all connectors and cables 
necessary to get the SR3 up and running. 
Interfacing the SR3 to the radio is quite sim- 
ple. Connections are made to the microphone 
audio input, the PTT input (the SR3 PTT line 
goes low at transmit), and the external speak- 
er audio output. The SR3 has internal adjust- 
ment of both TX and RX audio levels. There 
are two versions of the SR3: the PL (Private 
Line) subaudible tone version, and the non-PL 
version. The unit reviewed here was the PL 
version, and I recommend it highly as it adds 



considerably to the versatility of the unit. 

As well as the connections to the radio iden- 
tified above, the SR3 needs to know when a 
signal is being received by the radio connect* 
ed to it. There are pins on the DB-25 interface 
connector that may be connected to any point 
in the radio that goes high (2-12 VDC) when a 
carrier is received. Many radios have "busy M 
LEDs that serve this purpose well. I used the 
"busy" LED on my Heathkit HW-2036 and it 
worked nicely. The problem with this is that 
the radio must be modified for this to work. 
Also, some of the newer rigs use an LCD 
"busy" indicator which may not have the cor- 
rect voltage level for the SR3, If you have the 
PL version of the SR3, this is not a problem. 
Whenever the SR3 hears the correct PL tone 
from the user's radio it assumes that a carrier 
is present. The big advantages of this are that 
absolutely no modifications are required of the 
radio, and communication may take place on 
the SR3 + s frequency, without being repeated, 
by simply turning off the PL on the user's rig. 
The PL version will detect the presence of the 
carrier by either the voltage level or the PL 
method. 

The SR3 is extremely reliable and easy to 
use. The three operating modes— "simplex 
repeater," "voice mailbox," and "voice re- 
peater IDer" — can be enabled or disabled via 
DTMF input from the user. It should be noted 
at this point that only one mode may be used 
at a time. For example, if the SR3 is in the 
"simplex repeat" mode it cannot be a "voice 
IDer." The SR3 comes standard with memory 
for storage of 16 seconds of voice. A maxi- 
mum of 64 seconds may be installed by 
adding additional SRAM chips. 

The Simplex Repeater Mode 

This is the mode that the SR3 defaults to 

after power-on reset. When the SR3 senses a 
carrier, it immediately goes into the "record" 
mode and stores the user's audio until the 
carrier drops. When the carrier is gone, the 
SR3 keys the transmitter and plays back the 
received audio, I found that after playing a bit 
with the RX and TX audio level adjustments, 
excellent audio quality could be obtained, I 
tried out the "voltage lever COR carrier de- 
tection technique in the shack and it seemed 
to work well. The PL carrier detection really 
shines, however. It worked quite reliably with 
all stations that tried it. 

The Voice Mailbox Mode 

This is a simple voice mailbox. It will store 
only one message at a time. If additional mes- 
sages are entered, they will overwrite the orig- 
inal message. The mailbox mode may be en- 
tered via the proper DTMF code. 

There are two ways to leave a message. In 
the first method, the user keys the transmitter, 
dictates the message and, without dropping 
the carrier, presses the correct DTMF key. 
The message is now stored and will be repeat- 
ed any time the SR3 senses a carrier. The SR3 
will not interrupt a OSO on frequency, but the 
message will be repeated each time a carrier 
is sensed and dropped. 

In the second method, prior to dictating the 
message, the user keys the transmitter and 



enters the correct three-number DTMF code, 
states the message, and sends the correct 
two-digit DTMF code, This all must be done 
without unkeying the transmitter. Now the 
message wilt only be repeated upon receipt of 
the correct DTMF code from the recipient. 
This may sound complex, but it is relatively 
easy to master. 

The Repeater IDer Mode 

This is a simple but effective way to either 
voice-ID your conventional repeater, or to gen- 
erate announcements of general interest. The 
SR3 contains a timer that may be set from 
about 1 seconds to 20 minutes. After loading 
a message or ID, the SR3 will output this mes- 
sage the first time the repeater is keyed. After 
this, the message will be disabled until the 
SR3's timer has reset. Upon completion of 
this reset, the message is enabled for trans- 
mission the next time the repeater is keyed. 
By sending the correct DTMF tone, the mes- 
sage may be generated at any time. 

Other Features 

The built-in DTMF decoder allows complete 
control of the SR3 remotely. Messages, IDs 
and voice mail may be entered and overwrit- 
ten using the correct codes, The SR3 may also 
be taken completely off line via DTMF control. 
An additional feature is a DPDT relay option 
that can be user-installed. This lets you pick 
up or drop out a relay via DTMF control. Use the 
relay contacts for your own control purposes. 

Other Uses 

Tim Barefoot KA3ATH has been of great 
assistance in this review. He interfaced the 
SR3 into his home station. A number of guys in 
the Keystone VHF Club of York, Pennsylva- 
nia, played around with it. All three modes of 
the SR3 were exercised and worked well. Ev- 
eryone was thoroughly fascinated with hear- 
ing their own voice being repeated back. The 
Keystone Club is in the process of putting up a 
440 MHz/50 MHz linked repeater. We 
presently have the SR3 interfaced as a sim- 
ptex repeater on the 6 meter side. It is interest- 
ing to drive around different areas of the 
county, store voice audio in the SR3> and play 
it back. It has told us a lot about the coverage 
that we expect to get from the repeater. We 
will probably try the SR3 on the 440 MHz side 
when we get it completely up and running. 

I have experimented with sending SSTV au- 
dio into the SR3 on 2 meters with my Robot 
1200. The audio back from it reproduced the 
original picture reasonably well. An SR3 
placed in a central location would allow all 
members of a club to evaluate the operation of 
their rigs by allowing them to listen to their own 
signal coming back. Finally, an SR3 in your 
shack in the voice mailbox mode would allow 
you to leave a message for the XYL, even if 
she was not home at the time. 

I found this device to be quite interesting 
and intriguing! There are many other uses for 
it. and one has to let his or her imagination set 
the limit. With the advent of inexpensive digit- 
al electronics, I hope that other products will 
be as innovative as the Brainstorm Engineer- 
ing SR3 when they hit the market. 




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CIRCLE 153 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 47 



Number 1 S on your Feedback card 




ARTERN BUY 



Turn your old ham and computer gear mlo cash now. Sure, you can wail for a 
harnf es* to try and dump it, but you Know you I I get a far more realistic price if you have 
tt out where 1 00.000 active ham potential buyers can see tt than the few hu ndred local 
hams who come Dy a flea market table Check your attic, garage, cellar and closet 
shelves and get cash for your ham and computer gear before rt's too old to sell. You 
know you're not gomg to use it again, so why leave it for your widow to throw out? That 
stuff isn't getting any younger 8 

The 79 Plea Market, Barter V Buy, costs you peanuts (almost}— comes to 35< a 
woe d for individual {noncommercial) ads and $i ,00 a word for commercial ads. Don f l 
plan on telling a long story. Use abbreviations, cram it in. Bui be honest. There are 
plenty of hams who love to fix things, so if it doesn't work, say so. 

Make your list, count the words, including your call, address and phone number. 
Include a check or your credit card number and expiration, II you re placing a 
commercial ad, include an additional phone number, separate from your ad. 

This is a monthly magazine, not a daily newspaper, so figure a couple months 
before the action starts; then be prepared, If you get too many calls, you priced It low. 
ft you don "I get many calls, too high. 

So get busy. Blow the dust off. check everything oui n make sure it stiJI works right 
and maybe you can help make a ham newcomer or retired ofd timer happy with thai 
rig you're not using now. Or you might get busy On your computer and put together a 
list of smail gear/pans to sand to those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to the Barter TV Buy, Donna DiRusso, Forest Road. 
Hancock NN 03449 and get set for the phone catts. 



BATTERY PACK REBUILDING: SEND 
YOUR PACK / 48Hfl SERVICE, ICOM: 
BP2/BP3/BP22 $19.95. RP5/BP8/BP23 
$25.95 BP24/BP70 S26.95, BP7 $32.95, 
KENWOOD PB21 $15.95, PB21H/PB6 
$22 95. PB25/26 $24.95. PB2/PBB 
$29,95; YAESU: FNB9 51995. FNB10/17 
$23.95. FNBM $29 95, FNB3/4/4A 
$3695, STS: AV7600 S27.95. ZENITH/ 
TANDY LT PACKS $54,95 "U-OCHT IN^ 
3ERTS" ICOM: BP3/BP22 S16.95 T BP5/ 
a/24/70 $21 95 KENWD PB21 $12,95. 
PB21H $18.95, PB24/25/26 S19.95; TEM- 
PO/8 $22.95. YAESU: FNB9 S16.95 + 
FNS10/17 $18,95. FNB4/4A $32.95. AZ- 
DEN: $1995. "NEW PACKS": ICOM 
BPSB (BS CHG) $34,95 SANTEC: 142/ 
1200 $22.95. YAESU FNB2/50Q £19,95. 
FNB2/600 $23,95, FNB17 $34.95 h FREE 
CATALOG, $3.00 Shipping/order, 
PA + 6%, VISA-MC + $2.00 n CUNARD, 
R.D.6 Box 104, Bedford PA 15522. (914) 
623-7000. BNB258 

CHASSIS, CABINET KITS SASE, 
K31WIC, 5120 Harmony Grove Rd., Dover 
PA 17315. BNS259 

SPECTRUM ANALYZER for your oscillo- 
scope with X-Y display. 1-170 MHz i 200 
kHz resolution, audio monitor. 60 dB dis* 
play, 59 dB step attenuator, marker every 
10 MHi. Wall buktr home-brew deisgn, 
made two exira to oovar my cost. SA.S.E. 
for detailed information $325. NX9V, 218 
H kjh. M moral Po» nt Wl 5356S , BN B262 

AMATEUR RADIO CLASSIFIED Quality 
equipment Buy/Self /Trade publication. 
Published twice monthJy. Samples free. 
Ads; 25 cents/word. Subscriptions: $12/ 
yr. POB 245-S. Jonesboro GA 30237 

BNB2S3 
HOME-BREW PROJECTS lists for 
SA.S,E. Kenneth Hand, P.O. Box 708, 
East Hampton N Y 1 1 937. BNS264 

WANTED: Manual or instructions for a 
TET HB203RSP S-elemem antenna. Copy 
OK. Tim Montroy VE3YTV, 21 15 Ridge- 
way Slreet. Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada 
P7E 5J8, or call (607) 623-2488, BNB265 

COMPLETE HP STATION FOR SALE 
Kenwood TS-940-AT. SP-940, MC-60A, 
HS-5 phones, PC-1A. LF-30A, YK-88-C, 
SW-2000, IF-10S, IF-232C, Heit Boomset. 
Alliance HD<73, Ameritron AL-80A, ATR- 
15 tuner, Hy*Oain Explorer^ 4 beam with 
30/40M oplion, PLUS all cabling. OVER 
S6000 new, ONLY $3500. Don Bledsoe 
WB6LYI, PO. Box 9 1299, Long Beach CA 
90814, (2 131 494-6765. BNB266 



QSL CARDS' Look good with top quality 
printing. Choose standard destgns or fully 
customized cards Belter cards mean 
more returns to you. Free brochure, sam- 
ples Stamps appreciated. Chester OSLs. 
Dept A, 310 Commercial, Emporia KS 
66801, or FAX request to (31 6) 342-4705 

BNB434 

SUPERFAST MORSE CODE SU- 
PEREASV, Subliminal cassette $10. 
LEARN MORSE CODE IN 1 HOUR. 
Amazing new super easy technique $10. 
Both $17. Moneyhack guarantee. Free 
catalog: SASE. Bahr. Dept 73-1, 7320 
Normandy. Cedar Rapids I A 52402 

BNB531 

SB-220/221 OWNERS: 20 detailed mods 
which include 160-8 meter operation, 
OSK. + enhanced p,s. 50% rebate for new 
mods submitted! 9 pages of 3-500Z lech 
Info- $1 1 postpaid— Info. SASE, BOB KO- 
ZLAREK WA2SQQ, 69 Memorial Place, 
Elmwood Park NJ 07407. BNB581 

ROSS' $$$S USED May SPECIALS: 
Drake RV7 $159,90, TR-7NB.FL $699.90. 
PS-7 $169.90, P-75 $69.90; ICOM IC- 
735.FL30 $799.90, PS-15 $122.90. SM-6 
$29.90; ARD 230A AMP $3999.90; YAE- 
SU FC 757AT $259.90. FT-7 $299,90. 
FRA-770O $39 90, FT-301D $369.90, FP- 
301 $109 90, FTV'650 $169,90, NC-8A 
$6590 LOOKING FOR SOMETHING 
NOT LISTED?? CALL OR SEND 
SAS.E . HAVE OVER 185 USED ITEMS 
in stock. MENTION AD. PRICES CASH. 
FOB PRESTON. HOURS TUESDAY- 
FRIDAY 9 00 TO 6:00, 9:00-2.00 P.M. 
MONDAYS. CLOSED SATURDAY & 
SUNDAY ROSS DISTRIBUTING COM- 
PANY. 78 SOUTH STATE, PRESTON ID 
B3263 , (208) 852-0830 i BNB654 

WRITTEN EXAMS SUPEREASY. Memo- 
ry aids from psychologist/engineer cut 
studyiime 50%. Novice, Tech, Gen: $7 
each. Advanced, Extra. Si 2 each. Money- 
back guarantee. Bahr, Dept 73-1, 7320 
Normandy, Cedar Rapids IA 52402. 

BN8691 

ROSS* S$$S NEW May (ONLY) SPE- 
CIALS: LOOKING FOR THAT HARD TO 
FIND ITEM?? HEATH KIT SB-1000 
$679.90, HW24-AT $339 90, HW-2P 
$279.90, HN 31 A $23.90; SHURE 444D 
$59.90. CB-42 $31 ,90, 52ST $74,90; HAL 
PCI^2000 $339.90: YAESU YR-901 
$449.90, FT-747GX $639.90; ICOM IG- 
725 $765 90, IC-45A $289.99, IC-471H 
$890.90, EX- 108 $109.90; KENWOOD 
TS-440SWAT $1209.90, TS-14QS 
$765 90, VFO-7Q0S $149.90; ASTRON 



RS-12A $68.95. RS-20A $67 90, RS-35A 
$139.90; ALINCO DJ-560T $379,90, DJ- 
160T $244 90, DR-570T $495,90, DR- 
110T $285,00, DR-590T $560 00: BUT- 
TERNUT HF6V^X S 144 90, STR-II $35.90 
SEND S^S.E. FOR USED LIST ALL 
LT.O fLlMITEDTIME OFFER) LOOKING 
FOR SOMETHING NOT USTED?? CALL 
OR WRITE. Over 9039 ham-related 
items m stock for immediate shipment . 
Mention ad Prices cash. FOB. PRES- 
TON. HOURS TUESDAY-FRfDAY 900 
TO 6;OO t 9:00-2:00 P,M MONDAYS. 
CLOSED SATURDAY & SUNDAY. ROSS 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 78 SOUTH 
STATE, PRESTON ID 83263. (208) 852- 
0630 BNB709 

HAM RADIO REPAIR all makes, models. 
Experienced, reliable service. Robert Hall 
Electronics, Box 280363, San Francisco 
CA 94128-0363. (408) 729-8200 BN6751 

WANTED; Ham equipment and other 
property. The Radio Club of Junior High 
School 22 NYC, Inc., is a noriprofil organi- 
zation, granted 501(C)(3) status by the 
IRS, incorporated with the goal of using 
the theme of ham radio to furl her and en- 
hance the education of young people na- 
honwide. Your property donation or finan- 
cial support would he g really appreciated 
and acknowledged with a receipt for your 
tax deductible contribution. As 1991 be- 
gins, please look over whatever unwanted 
equipment you may have, and call us We 
will pick up or arrange shipping. You will 
receive the tax deduction, but most impor- 
lant the privilege of knowing thai your gift 
really made a difference in the education 
and upbringing of a child. Meet us on the 
VYB2JKJ CLASSROOM NET, 1200 UTC 
ON 7.238 MHz. and hope to see you at 
Birmingham Wnte us at: The RC o* JHS 
22 NYC, Inc., P.O. Box 1052. New York 
NY !0002. Round the ciOC* HOTLINES: 
Voice (51 5} 674-4072. FAX (516) 674- 
9600. BNB762 

"HAMLOG" COMPUTER PROGRAM 
Full features IB modules. Auto4ogs, 7- 
band WASfDXCC. Apple, IBM, CP/M + 
KAYPRO, TANDY. CR8 $24,95. 73- 
KA1 AWH, PB 2015, Peabody MA 01960. 

BNB775 

LAMBDA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB Inter- 
national amateur radio dub for gay and 
lesbian hams. On-air skeds, monthly 
newsletter, and annual gathering at Day- 
ton, (215) 978-LARC. P.O. Box 24BT0, 
Philadelphia PA 19130, BNBS1 2 

INEXPENSIVE HAM RADIO EQUIP- 
MENT. Send postage stamp for list. Jim 
Brady— WA40SO, 3037 Audrey Dr„ Gas- 
tonia NC 28054, BNB890 

WANTED: BUY & SELL All types Of Elec- 
tron Tubes. Calt toll free 1 (800) 421 -9397 
or 1 (612) 429-9397 C & N Electronics. 
Harold BramstedL 6104 Egg Lake Road. 
Hugo MN 55038- BNB900 

ELECTRON TUBES: All types & Siies. 
Transmitting, receiving, microwave . . 
Large inventory = same day shipping 
Ask about our 3-500Z special. Daily Elec- 
tronics. P.O- Box 5029, Compron CA 
90224(800)34^6667, BNB913 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROGRAMS— 8 
disk sides over 200 Ham programs 
$16.95, 25? stamp gets unusual somvare 
catalog of Utilities, Games, Adult and 
Bntish Disks Home-Spun Software, Box 
1064-BB, Estero FL 33928. BNB91 7 

CODE RTTY Send-Receive Disk VtC-20, 
C-64, send $5, Tape $6. Codeware, Box 
3091 , Nashua NH 03061 . BNB&40 

WANTED: For museum and author— pre- 
1980 microcomputers and publications— 
also need CPM computers, Osborne, 
Kay pro. etc. Need author to write detailed 
book on how to use the PACKRATT soft- 
ware, Dave Larsen KK4WW, Black sburg 
Group, P.O. Box 1, BlacksburgVA 24063- 
0001 (703)763-331 1/231 -6478, BNB945 

JUST IMAGINE your own beautiful Blue 
Ridge mountain topQTH— seHing my 323- 



acre Christmas tree farm — all or part- 
trees optional. KK4WW, Royd VA, (703) 
763-3311. BNB956 

CUSHCRAFT, Barter & Williamson, pow- 
er supplies, rotors, Oaluns, center insula- 
tors, ladder line, coax, connectors, sur 
plus tubes. ATKINSON & SMITH, 17 
Lewis St* Eatontown NJ 07724. 1 (800) 
542-2447. BNB957 

2600/2510 OWNERS Enjoy botfi 10 me- 
tefSi and 12! Easy conversion, all parts and 
instructions. $49.95, Edward Oros, 2fi29 
Sapling Drive, Allison Park FA 1 51 01 , 

BNBQSB 

FREE Ham Gospel Tracts, SASE, N3FTT. 
5l33Gramercy.C*ittonHts PA 19018 

BNB060 

BUILD 3W=OOT FREE STANDING TILT- 
OVER TOWER. Plan boofc, W.9S plus 
$1.00 S&H. Build metal laihe. metal 
shaper, milling machine, drill press* 
brake, engines, etc. Large SAS.E, for 
book list. Gingery Tool. P.O. Box 75, Ford- 
la nd MO 65652-0075 . BN B962 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects 
In 73, Ham Radio, QST r ARRL Handbook. 
List SASE. FAR Circuits. 1BN640 Field 
Ct.. Dundee IL 601 18 BNB966 

SATELLITE MONTHLY AUDIO CODES 1 

(900) HOT-SHOT intended lor testing on- 
ry $3,60 per call, BNB976 

DISPLAY YOUR TICKET OR QSL CARD 
engraved with remarkaote detail on an- 
odtzeti aluminum, handsomely mounted 
on walnut. One of a kind item. Greal gift lor 
ham friend or duo member, Free info. 
ONE CALL, Bom 34308, Los Angeles CA 
90034-0308. {21 3} 44 1-01 93 BNB978 

AZDEN SERVICE by former faclory tech- 
nician. NiCads $36 95 plus shipping. 
Southern Technologies Amateur Radio. 
Ina. 107TS SW 190 St, #9 t Miami FL 
33157.(305)238-3327. BNB979 

DIGITAL AUTOMATIC DISPLAYS Ken- 
wood, Yaesu, CoJIins, Drake, Atlas, etc. 
No handswitching required. Business 45c 
SAS.E, Be specific, GRAND SYSTEMS, 
Dept. A, P,0, Box 3377, Blaine WA 98230 
BNB981 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR Fast turn 
around. Southern Technologies Amateur 
Radio, 10715 SW 190th Slreet #9, Miami 
FL 33157. (305) 238-3327 BNB982 

TRAVEL! HIGH fNCOME! Radio officers 
needed for shipboard employment. Must 
have FCC Second Class Radiotelegraph 
license and background in el ec ironies 
Salary approximately $4,000 monthly to 
start, including vacation plus full benefits, 
Rae Echols. W7FFF. American Radio As- 
sociation. 5700 Hammonds Ferry Road, 
Linthicum He+ghts MD 21 090 BNB9B3 

IT'S BACK AND BIGGER THAN EVER: 
THE HW-8 HANDBOOK. Modifications 
for the Heath HW series of ORP rigs. A 
must for every ORPer. $7.95 plus $1 00 for 
firsi dass postage. Of DX Si 4 95 air, to 
Michael Bryce W88VGE, 2225 Mayflower 
NW. Massillon OH 44647. BNB984 

REPOSSESSED VA & HUD HOMES 
available from government from $1 with- 
out credit check. You repair. Also S&L 
bailout properties. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. J-W470 for repo list your area, 

BNB935 

SEIZED CARS, Trucks, boats, 4wheelers, 
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA. Available 
your area now. Call 1-805-662-7555 ext. 
C-3968. BNB936 

HELP! Looking for plans to a QRP trans- 
mitter thai was the cover slory in Popular 
or Radio Electronics, around 19687 I will 
buy the issue or pay for all costs to copy. 
Dan Szalay N8NCN, RD1 Box 2590, 
Reedsville PA 170B4. (717) 667-9793, 

BN8991 

HIGH EFFICIENCY BALUNS Legal limit 
on HF bands. Excellent for sipoles. 1:1 
ratio, $39,00 post paid U,S„ or for more 
info: WB5L, P.O. Bo* 157. PflugerviHe TX 
78660 



48 73 Amateur Radio Today • May* 1991 



Azden 

Service 

Center 



*s Your Azden Not 
Operating Properly?? 
Does It Turn Off When 
II Should Turn On^ 
1 1 You Have Any Problem 
With Your Azden Transceiver 
Send It To The Specialists 
A I The Azden Ser^ce Center 
Quick Turn Around!! 



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Your Problem Is Our Solution. 

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We Accept: VISA, Mastercard, 
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CIRCLE 289 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



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12-15 VDC. Usable 2-1100 MHz, with 
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Boh Winn W5KNB 
%P.Q. Sox 832205 
Richardson TX 75083 

Expedition News 

AS Bhutan. Jim VK9NS and Kirsti 
VK9NL are planning to operate from 
Bhutan, beginning around May 1- This 
will be the second operation for Jim, 
who signed A51 JS last year, 

USGUT. During February and 
March, Nick UB5UT was active from 
Lavrenliya with this special callsign. 
Lavrenliya is located just across the 
Bering Strait from the mainland of 
Alaska. For DXCC purposes, a contact 
with this station counts for the DXCC 
country of Asiatic FlS.RS.R (UA9/UA/0K 
OSL via Romeo Stepenenko t Box 812. 
Sofia 1000, Bulgaria. 

UNSC8R1— Guyana. This is not a 
new type of antenna; it ts the callstgn of 
a new station operating from Guyana 
(8R1). The operator told K50VC that 
Ihts is the callsign typed on his license, 
and he is using it accordingly. It should 
probably be more like 8R 1 UNSC. OSL 
to Juan Larrabure, 42 Brickdam, 
Georgetown. Guyana. 

Pirates. 3 AGRA was a pirate. Dent 
waste your lime or money sending a 
QSL to W4RA for a contact with him. 
Larry W4RA knows nothing about this 
station and is certainly not the QSL 
manager, 5X5GH, who also said to 
OSL via W4RA, is also believed to be 



SAT DX was also a pirate; don't both- 
er QSLing to W4BFO for this one. 

The station signing VU2TU/VU7 
(Nicobar Islands?) appears to be a pi- 
rate, VU2RX is reported to have said 
that Indian regulations do not allow In- 
dian stations to use a portable callstgn. 
This station, if it had been legitimate, 
would have signed VU7TU. 

XZ9A Burma. The persistent opera- 
tion by XZ9A during February was the 
work of a pirate. The operator said to 
QSL via JA8IXM JA8IXM knows noth- 
ing about this station, 

QSL Notes 

VKSMR and VKBLHt Not via 
VK2WU The manager for VK9MR 
(Mellish Reef) and VK9LH1 (Lord Howe 
Island) is NOT the current license hold- 
er of the callsign VK2WU The former 
VK2WU. who was the QSL manager 
for both stations, has moved, changed 
catlsigns. etc. and evidently did not 
finish answering OSL card requests lor 
eilher station. Does anyone know the 
whereabouts of the logs for these sta- 
tions? 

ETZA Ethiopia. There is a station on 
the air from Ethiopia! We've been get- 
ting bits and pieces of rumors during 
the past few months about a possible 
ET operation, but nothing worth print- 
ing ..until February. The station is 
ET2A and the mam operator is Jack 
W4IBB. Jack's wife and another opera- 



Hams Around the World 



tor named Scott may also operate the 
station from time to time, Jack has 
been trying to Obtain a license for a 
year and a half 

There is a written license (which may 
be renewed), and by now it should 
have been forwarded to to the DXCC 
Desk. The station consists of a TS- 
1408 transceiver and various anten- 
nas. Don't expect much, if any, CW 
activity from Jack, but Scott may give it 
a go OSL via WB2WOW, 

Publications for DXers 

The ARRL has published a new book 
on OX. Mark AA2Z. ARRL Publications 
Manager, describes The DXCC Com- 
panion: How To Work Your First 100 
Couniri&s, by Jim Kearman KR1S. as: 
"Intended for new DXers. . it covers 
the sport of DXing from making the first 
DX contact to applying for the DX Cen- 
tury Club (DXCC) award. Everything 
the beginner needs to know about an- 
tennas, propagation, working split,' 
sending OSLs, and working DX on nets 
and lists, is presented m a bright, hu- 
morous style," 

KRlS's publication doesn't cover 
everything, but it is a fine publication, 
and it certainly contains most of the 
information the beginning DXer needs. 
It's informative, easy to read T and cer- 
tainly a worthy addition to any new DX- 
er's library. 

You can order The DXCC Compan* 
ion, a 129-page soft cover book, Irom 
the ARRL, 225 Main Street. Newmgton 
CT 06111. The cost is $6,00 (plus 
$2.50 for postage and handling; $3.50 
for UPS). 

A booklet, "Russian Phrases for Am- 
ateur Radio/' is available from Len 
Traubman W6KJK, 1448 Cedarwood 
Drive, San Mateo CA 94403, The cost 
of this booklet is $5, A 90-minute cas- 
sette tape is available for $6. 

Special Prefixes 

1H0, W4 t 7PT, etc The "one" pre- 
fixes are un assigned, but several call- 
slgns with the "one" prefix have been 
adopted for use by stations operating 
from the DXCC countries of the Sprally 
Islands (IS) and the Sovereign Military, 

Order of Malta (1A0KM), "One" pre- 
fixes have also been used on a regular 
basis by American operators when on 
IOTA expeditions. For example; NE8Z/ 
1C4 and K1RH/1H8 from one of the 
islands in the South Carolina Group 
(IOTA designator NA-110) and several 
Texans have used the 1P1 prefix from 
Pelican tsland (Galveston, Texas). The 
use of the self-assigned "one" prefix- 
es by LLS. operators is not illegal 

7S30WG Otymptc Wmter Games 
1998. The special callsign 7S30WG 
will be used until June 15 by members 
of the Jentlands ARC (SK3JR) to prr> 
mote Ostersund (Sweden's candidate 
for the 1998 Olympic Winter Games). 
GSLviaSM3CVM 




i • i 



Number 1 7 on your Feedback card 



0RY 



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Ross WB7BY2 has the largest stock of 
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Park Ridge 
North Jersey's oldest and finest Short- 
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from Garden State Parfrway, Authorized 
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Lee WK3T. GtLFER SHORTWAVE, 52 
Park Ave., Park Ridge NJ 07656. (201) 
391-7887. 



NEW YORK 



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Western New Yorks finest amateur radio 
dealer featuring ICOM-Larsen-AEA- 
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(716) 664-6345. Cirde Reader Service 
number 129 lor more in formation. 

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Manhattan's largest and only ham and 
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TOROLA, ICOM. KENWOOD, YAESU. 
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stock of radios and accessories. Repair 
lab on premises. Open 7 days M-F, 9-6 
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OHIO 



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Central Ohio's fulWine authorized dealer 
for Kenwood, ICOM, Yaesu, Allnco, Info* 
Tech, Japan Radio. AEA. Cushcraft. Hus- 
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too, UNIVERSAL RADIO, 1280 Aida 
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43060, (614) 8*6-4267. 



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Authorized factory sales and service. 
KENWOOD. ICOM, YAESU, featuring 
AMERITRON, 6&W, MFJ, HYGAiN, KLM. 
CUSHCRAFT, HUSTLER, KANTRON- 
ICS. AEA, VI3ROPLEX. HEIL, CALL- 
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more HAMTRONICS. INC. 4033 
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In Dallas since 1960. We feature Ken* 
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TX 75201. (214) 969-1936. Circle Read- 
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QSL Routes 



302W2 via G3W2 

4K1ADQ Vlad hranov t P.O. Box 88, 

Kolpino-3. Leningrad, USSR 
4LJ1ITU ARRLDXCW(Feb91) 

via N6TR 
8P6NX ViaWiSA 

9H1EU viaWA4JTK 

9M6ET via WB2KXA 

9M6HF viaWEZK 

9MSQB viaDJIUJ 

9M8RH via DJ40I 

9M8WB via DK7UY 
A71AM vtaDJSZB 

A71CD P.O. Bo* 1007. Doha, 

Qatar 
AT0NRO via VU2APR 
BY1BJ Box 61 11. Beijing, 

People's Republk: of China 
C2UM New: Jim Motiti, P.O. Box 359, 

Republic of Nauru. 

Central Pacific 
CN8NY Yousef, Box 6557, 

Rabat. Morocco 
EL2SM viaSM3HML 

ET2A via WB2WOW 

FY5FP viaON42D 

HH4TD notviaKP4NL 
HR2BDC Dean Gary, Box 7373 

EagJe Pass, TX 78853 
IS1W viaHRBJ 

IU8A via iKBDOl 

J6LTA via NI4M 

JHGBBE/JDiviaJHIBBBE 
JT8AA Box 49, Altaj 050000, 

Mongolia 
K8MFO/6Y5 viaWBTPS 
KB5NIV/DU4 via WA5ADH 
KHe/JJ3XRZ viaJFSKOZ 
P29AC via VK8AC 

P29DK via KE4EW 



PA6A viaPA^CLN 

PW8XX viaPYIAJK 
PYCRC via PY5SM 
RA1 AK8 Box 300, Kronshtadt 

City, }8%10, USSR 
RL7GEK Box 1 , Alma-Ata 480068, 

Kazakh. USSR 
RZ1A P.O. Box 417, 

Leningrad 191011, USSR 
T30DQ via DL5UF 

T30DR viaDL2GBT 

TBiDS via DJ9Z8 

TA2^F6FO viaWA2NHA 
TG9CXM viaKSBYV 
TJ1BJ vlaK4UTE 

TJ1CW viaF6EEM 
TJ1YL ViaF6FYP 

TR8WJH viaG4TWT 
TY2AB vialK8DOI 

U23WWD Oimitry Orekhov. P.O. Box 80. 

Jarosfavlt50000,USSR 
V63BH viaJAlUZI 

VE4GW6Y5 viaVE4GV 
VP2VM Feb. 1991 via KU2Q 
VP2V/K5NA viaKU2Q 
VP2V/KU20viaKU2Q 
VQ9WM viaK7lOO 
WA6VRS/DU3 

Terrell Cohen, PSC 3. 

P.O. Box 15556 

APO San Frandsoo CA 

(do not put call on envelope) 

wEec/BV2 viawuex 

XFdC via XE1BEF (Clarion Island) 

XV5XA vlaJAlAH 

YY5P viaYVBARV 

ZC4 MT Box 413. Lamaca, Cyprus 

ZV7B1 via P776I 

ZWfMl via PY5TT (Me^ island) 

ZXCMXK viaPY2MXK 



50 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 




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Ham-Com '91Pre-ReQ}stration Form. Deadline Mav 31. 1 991 



Name 



Call 



Address 
City 



Stale 



Zip. 



Phone Number ( 



J 



14th Annual Ham-Com 



Amateur Radio Convention 

Arlington Convention Center 

June 7-9, 1991 

Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, Texas 

The Big One in Texas!!! 
Over 8.000 Expected! 

• Exhibits & Dealers! 
•*•• 

• Indoor, Air Conditioned Flea Market! 

*••* 

• Programs & Forums Covering Every 

Aspect of Amateur Radiol 

*•*• 

• License Exams! 

**** 

• Fun for the Entire Family in the Heart 
of the Metroplex Amusement Complex 

Six Flags - Wet N'Wild 

•*•• 

For More Info Call: (214) 521-9430 



I 

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Singfe Pre- Registration, $8.00 Each... , .$ 

Family Pre- Registration for 1 Ham & Non-Hams (Max of 3) 

inmyimmediateFamily,$11.00 ..„, $ 

1CV10 Inn Convention Group Registration, $1 .00 Eactu,. $ 

Flea Market Tables - Max of 3, $1 5,00 Each ,„.. $ 

Additional Flea Market Tables over first 3, $25,00 Each $ 

Flea Market Electrical Outlet, $32,00 Each .,„.„„ $ 

Saturday YL Breakfast, $10,00 $ 

Saturday DX Lunch & Program. $15.00 Each. $ 

Saturday Evening 10-10/Ham-Com Banquet $16.00 Each $ 

Sunday Morning QCWA Breakfast, $4 00 Each ....$ 

Tour #1 , Stock Yards & Omni Theater, $15,00 Each.... $ 

Tour #2, Outlet Mall & Crafts Mall, $10.00 Each...... ., .,_$ 

I have enclosed my checH in th e amount ot._.„. .,..„.„._$! 

Yes. I plan to attend the Wouff Hong* 

To pay for your pre-registration with MasterCard of Visa, please provide 

the following: Visa MasterCard 

Credit Card Number Exp. Date 

Signature 



Checks & 



To >» Ham-Com 4 91 Convention 
P.O. Box 861829, Piano, Texas 75086-1829 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 51 



A TV 



Number 1 B on your Feedback card 



Bill Brown WEBELK 
%7Z Magazine 
Fomst Road 
Hanc&ck NH 03449 

ATV in Space 

When the STS-37 shuttle mission 
bfasts off this April 4th. (fit be the sec- 
ond time an ATV receiver has been put 
into space, The first was the 1265 MHz 
receiver on me Weber sat rnicrosaL 
Trie next step? How about an ATV 
tr&nsntimr in space? 

Project Excelsus 

Students from Southeastern Com- 
munity College in Whiteville. North 
Carolina, pi an to launch their own 
space mission sometime in mid- May. 
Instructors Ben Frink and David Cou- 
vi 1 1 on KC4WDW, along with Simms 
Spears, have put together a team of 
electronics and physics students who 
are busily assembling a very unique 
roc kety balloon (Rockoon) system. 

The Rockoon 

The students" ultimate goal us to 
launch a live color camcorder and an 
ATV transmitter to an altitude in excess 
of 50 miles (the beginning ot space!). 
To accomplish this they are building a 
10-fooi long rocket (6 inches in diame- 
ter) which wHI carry a color camcorder 
and a PC Electronics KPA5-RC 1 watt 



Ham Television 

ATV transmitter (439.25 MHz), A sec- 
ond transmitter on 1255 MHz FM TV 
(TD. Systems) will send back pictures 
from a B/W camera Even though they 
will be using a large Vulcan '"M" size 
rocket motor, they could only reach a 
maximum height of a few thousand 
feet if launched from the ground. How- 
ever, the plan is to fly the rocket up to 
1 00,000 feet attached to a large plastic 
balloon (RAVEN model 52k). Since 
1 00.000 feet js above most of the atmo- 
sphere* igniting their rocket from this 
point could send it up over 350,000 feet 
high. 

Many government Rockoon fNghts 
have been flown to study the upper 
atmosphere. Some of these have 
made it well over 100 miles up. 

The Rockoon consists of two sepa- 
rate packages, the rocket ATV system 
and the launch control platform. 
Telemetry from the platform is relayed 
down to mission control via a packet 
link designed by PacComm. The fire 
command is issued via this link which 
activates a special ignitor circuit. In ad* 
dition. a third ATV camera and trans- 
mitter on 426,25 MHz will be located on 
the platform which will allow us all to 
monitor the rocket and watch the liftoff! 
There will be packet telemetry on 2m 
FM from the rocket as welf as the 
launch platform. The final telemetry 
frequencies will be announced a few 



weeks before the flight. 

Since the rocket won't achieve any* 
where near orbital velocity, it will come 
back to earth as soon as it hits the 
maximum altitude. After ignition, the 
whole flight into space should only 
take a few minutes. 

The Rockoon will be launched from 
the North Carolina shoreline and 
should drift about 50 miles out lo sea 
before the rocket is fired. Thai way the 
rocket will return for a splashdown 
in the Atlantic, Several chase boats 
will be on hand to attempt a recovery. 

Go Along for the Ride 

Anyone within 400 miles of the 
launchsite should be able to receive 
the balloon transmission 
and watch the launch 
of the rocket. If 
the rocket 
makes 
it up 



lo 50 to 1 00 miles, you may be able to 

watch spectacular views of space 

from over 700 miles away! At any 

rale, it ought to be quite a ride! For 

those of you using a cable -ready 

VCR or TV, you can tune in the 

rocket ATV transmitter on cable 

channel 60 and the controJ/igni- 

tor camera on cable channel 58 

(use a good vertically polarized 

70 cm antenna for best results). 

An HF net will convene before 

and during the flight on 7.155 

MHz with launch updates, It will 

also collect reception reports. 

High Flying ATV at SCC 

The Rockoon flight is the 

culmination of 

sever- 




Photo A, The first SCC rocktitATV flight. 



p i 



21 



6H 



POWES 

TOWi SMUTCH 

-* 




P*0*CHvlTE 
ANTENNA 



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114 



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ItoSTKUMEhTATKJN 
AMPS A FllTERl 



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3/16" 



BY BOBBY RAY 



Figure. Diagram of the SCC space probe. Drawing by Bobby Ray 



$2 73 Amateur Radio Today * May. 1991 



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Photo S, A few members of the launch team holding the first balloon payload. From 
t ro r; Simms Spears, David Couvitton KC4WDW, Ben Frink, Bob Rau N8IYD and 
Bill Brown WB8ELK. 



west of the ocean. Although local 
Wilmington. North Carolina, radio club 
members gave it their best shot, il was 
nearly impossible to get any signal 
through the dense pme forests in the 
area. Fortunately, two days later, a lo- 
cal resident found the payload lying in 
a ditch an the side of a small road. 

The SCO group hope that these ATV 
experiments wilt inspire other schools 
to develop projects of their own. It's a 
great way to learn electronics white do- 
ing something new and exciting. 

Launch Info 

Update The cross-country 
manned ATV balloon night covered in 



Dayton HAM TV Activities 

Plenty of ATV activities can be found 
Ihis year at the Dayton Hamvention. 
Check out the Friday evening (7:30 
p. m .^midnight) annual ATV PARTY at 
the Holiday Inn North (just off exit 57-8 
on Interstate 75), Since over 150 
ATVers attended last year's party, this 
year it will be held in the Grand Ball- 
room (seals 300), Lots of great speak- 
ers, demos and, of course, ATVers 
from around the world. Quite a contin- 
gent from the BATC (British Amateur 
Television Club) plan to attend this 
year. 

The ATV Forum will once again be 





Photo C Downlink video from the five camera payload. (a) the Georgia Pacific plant from 2000 feet, (b) 200 miles of the North and South Carolina coastline as seen from 
65,000 feet. 



airborn expenments that students at 
Southeastern Community College 
have performed. Their first flight con* 
sisted of a 4-foot model rocket with an 
HVM-322 camera and a TV transmitter 
which the students designed in their 
electronic engineering techology 
class. This flight was launched last 
May from the campus parking lot up to 
about BOO feet. When the camera 
popped out of the fuselage, you could 
see the crowd of onlookers getting 
closer and closer as the package 
parachuted back down. It was great to 
see the smiling face of the lucky stu- 
dent who caught It before it hit the 
ground! 

The class became inspired by their 
initial success and invited Bob Rau 
(rocketeer) and me (balloonatic) down 
to help ihem launch their next payload 
on a high -altitude balloon Just after 
noon on October 23, their live camera 
ATV payload was launched from the 
SCC campus attached to a Moot 
weather balloon. The class gathered 
around the ATV receive station at mis- 
sion control (the electronics lab), fasci- 
nated by the spectacular views of the 
Norm and South Carolina countryside 
coming down from the balloon system. 
At 65.000 feet nearly 200 mites of the 
Atlantic coastline could be seen. 
Thanks to the efforts of Hap Griffin 
WA4UMU, visitors to the ATV booth at 
the Sumter, South Carolina, hamfest 
were watching as well. In addition, 
Fred Tuck WD4KTI and Don Former 
K4SAO had good reception from In- 



man. South Carolina (200 miles). One 
of the most amazing reception reports 
came from Ken Gallagher VY3DFS in 
Adelphi, Maryland (350 miles away) 
who reported a completely snow-free 
P5 signal for about 10 minutes! 

After the balloon burst, the package 
parachuted down to land just 8 miles 



last March's column has been post- 
poned until September. Look for fur- 
ther information and updates about 
this flight and Project Ex eels us via 
A MS AT bulletins (both the nets and 
packet BBSs) as well as the Tuesday 
night ATV net on 3.871 MH* (8 p.m. 
Eastern time). 



chaired by Tom O'Hara WSOBG at 
O'Hare arena on Saturday afternoon. 
Look for talks by Tom W60RG. Carole 
Perry WS2MGP. Dave Baxter W5KPZ 
and myself, 

WhiJe at Dayton, listen in to the ac- 
tion on either 144.34 MHz or 147.45 
MHz SEE you all there! 




Photo 0. Southeastern Community College students hard at work building the Excefsus rocket fto r:Jan Knotts, Bobby Ray, 
Marty Scoff, Chris Gitliard, Tim Andrews and Chris FormyDuvai. 



54 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 55 




Number 1 9 on your Feedback card 



mwo ©dj\ 




Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors. Inc. 

P.O. Box 131648 

Staten Island NY 1O31&OQ06 

An Invitation to 4U1 UN 

Most of us would agree that any 8th 
grader should be able to speak intellt- 
gently about the United Nations, its 
background, and its role in the world 
today. Imagine my surprise at learning 
that only 20% ot my 400 students in the 
6th, 7th, and 81h grades could even 
identify the world famous profile of the 
UN Buiidingat 42nd Street in New York 
City? My incredulity grew as I discov* 
ered that most of them didn't realize 
that we. in Stalen Island, were within 
45 minutes of the UN Complex. 

You can hardly open a newspaper or 
listen to a TV news broadcast without 
some visuaJ represent ion of the UN 
in the background. The world crisis 
centering around the Persian Gulf . and 
the recent role ot the General Assem- 
bly, should have prompted provocative 
discussions in every school in the 
country. El is appalling to think that so 
many youngsters have disfranchised 
themselves intellectually from discus- 
sions or opinions about world events, 
The responsible adults among us 
should point out thai it's their future 
hanging in the balance, loo. and that 
they have an obligation to be well-In- 
formed about the decisions that world 
leaders are making. 

We often get involved in discussions 
on current events as a direct result of 
contacts we make on the radio to differ* 
em pans of the world. The teacher of 
an amateur radio course can easily 
bring in topics from other studies to the 
classroom. I was especially delighted, 
therefore, when l received an invitation 
to visit the United Nations amateur ra- 
dio station, 4U1UN. This would be a 
great opportunity to bring information 
about this world body back into the class- 
room in a meaningfuf and exciting way. 

I shared my feelings of excitement 
with the children. Suddenly, students 
were telling me whai they'd heard 
about the UN on the news on TV F and 
they began bringing in newspaper arti- 
cles about the General Assembly and 
the Security Council. 

On Tour at the United Nations 

When the big day arrived, I was 
given a list of questions prepared by 
the children in Iheir social studies 
classes. Their teachers were delighted 
wilh the interest, and it was gratifying 
to me to be part of a team effort in 
education. 

Upon my arrival at the UN t I was met 
by Da*d Rosen K2GM T the station 
manage of 4U 1 UN. David was my gra- 
cious hc^t for the day. During a won- 
derful lunch at the UN restaurant, we 
spoke about the background and histo- 
ry of the UN. 

The UN is an international organiza- 
tion of sovereign nations, established 



to serve the cause of peace. According 
to its Charter, the UN attempts to do 
this through political action, such as 
mediation or prevention of conflicts 
among nations, and promotion of 
higher living standards through eco- 
nomic and social action. Its purpose is 
to develop friendly relations and coop- 
eration among nations, and to serve as 
a center for harmonizing international 
action. 

Since 1 941 , the UN has had several 
different sites. In 1946, the General As- 
sembly accepted $8 .500,000 from the 
American philanthropist John D Rock- 
erf eller . Jr., to purchase a I S-acre site 
bordering the East River between 42nd 
and 48th Streets in Manhattan. Later 
the site was granted extraterritoriality 
status under the Headquarters Agree- 
ment concluded between the UN and 
the US, on June 26, 1947. Plans for 
the famous UN Complex were drawn 
up under the guidance of American ar- 
chitect Wallace Harrison, and unani* 
mously adopted by the General As- 
sembly in November 1947. The 
cornerstone was laid on UN Day, Octo- 
ber 24, 1949, and work was completed 
by the middle oft 952. 

The four main buildings are the Gen- 
eral Assembly Hall the Conference 
Bu tiding, the Pag Hammarskjotd Li- 
brary, and the Secretariat Building, 
which houses the amateur radio sta- 
tion 4U1 UN. 

In 1946, the UN adopted its official 
emblem, a map of the worfd seen from 
the North Pole, surrounded by two 
wreaths of olive branches. The UN 
flag, adopted in 1947, displays this em- 
blem in white, centered on a light blue 
background. 

Station 4U1 UN 

After an exir emery informative tour 
of the complex, we spent several hours 
at 4U1UN. UN staff from all over the 
world, such as Panama, Sri Lanka, and 
Poland, comprise the UN Amateur Ra* 
dio Club, ot which Raymond East 
KB2BKO is president. 

tn order for the station to assist more 
efficiently, a special group of volun- 
teers has been organized The group 
consists of both amateurs and nona- 
mateurs from the UN staff. Since 1986, 
4U1UN and this support group have 
participated m 1 1 disaster operations. 

Most importantly, the group has ex- 
panded to include a growing number of 
amateur stations outside of Headquar- 
ters who work closely with 4U1 UN dur- 
ing crises. Most of these stations have 
been prominently involved with emer- 
gency actrvities in the past; they in- 
clude WA1KKP, VP2MO, NP2CM, 
WSCZN, OA40S. VS6VO. W9ARV, 
and K2EWB. Many other stations have 
recently joined the activity. 

David emphasized that the Radio 
Readiness Group is entirely an ama- 
teur radio undertaking, and that sta- 
tions interested in assisting 4U1UN 
when the normal channels of com- 



munications have been 
severed, are welcome to 
call in. 

During disasters, when 
amateur communications 
are required, the net will 
meet on specified frequen- 
cies. The principal frequen- 
cy is 14.268 MHz, wilh 
1 4 . 1 68 as an a! ternate (t raf- 
fle is also handled on other 
alternate frequencies as 
specified at the time). Other 
frequencies are 3768/3868/ 
70W7268/21 36Sffi8460. 

During disasters, 
4U1UN has been in liaison 
with relief agencies and 
other official entities. One 
such agency is UNDRO. 
"The United Nations Dis- 
aster Relief Organization" 
acts as a coordinator in the 
provision of aid to stricken 
areas. During emergency 
periods, 4U1UN has fur- 
nished UNDRO with post* 
event information about 
catastrophes. Situations 
involving hurricanes, vol- 
canoes, and earthquakes 
are all helped by the rapid 
relaying of information by 
the amateur community. 

Between the UN Head- 
quarters-based Radio 
Readiness Group, with all 
of their area and language 
expertise, and the dedicat- 
ed efforts of the Radio 
Readiness Group with the 
assistance of amateurs 
worldwide, tf is hoped that 
4U1UN and the Radio 
Readiness Group can 
make a difference, 

David offered these pri- 
orities: 

1 . To address the emer- 
gency requirements in the 
disaster area as it pertains 
to the preservation of life, 

2. To determine in a pre- 
cise manner the extenl of 
damages and needs— eg, T 
medicine, food, and shelter. 

3. To optimize actrvities lo be of the 
most value to the stricken area re- 
quires organizing Ihe Headquarters 
and on-the-air group so that both ele- 
ments may efficiently respond. 

4. To efficiently expedite health and 
welfare traffic. 

Members of the 4U1UN station feet 
that their amateur radio efforts meet 
the principles of the founding countries 
of the UN. It embodies what the nations 
of the world expected of the UN when 
they founded it. 

They hasten to add that emergency 
support activities are also prioritized by 
all the amateur radio service, and thay 
acknowledge the good work other 
emergency nets have done. 

David pointed out that Resolution 
No. 640: Relating to the International 
Use of Radiocommunications in the 
Event of Natural Disasters, in Fre- 
quency Bands Allocated to the Ama- 
teur Service (WARC 1979} has now 




Photo A, Carole Perry WB2MGP, enjoying working 
4UWN, 




Photo B. David Rosen K2GM, station manager of 
4UWN t stands beneath the 4-etement yagi on the 
UN building's roof 

been incorporated into the amateur 
regulations of several telecommunica- 
tion administrations. 

On the roof, there is a wonderful ar- 
ray of antennas, including a Hy-Gam 
TH4, a Cushcraft 1D3CD H a Create CL 
1QDX 6-elemenl 10 meter beam, 
dipoles for 40 and 80 meters, and a 
DX-88 7-band 10-80 vertical. A 
mggedized Telrex 20MS36 S-eiement, 
20 meter beam is on hand and awaits 
installation. At the station, which I had 
the pleasure of working that day, is a 
Kenwood TS-940S and a Kenwood 
TL922A amplifier. Davrd said their ob- 
jectives are to install equipment suffix 
cient to allow 4U 1 U N to operate on sev- 
eral bands simultaneously. 

My visit lo the UN was a personal 
treat for me, and also provided the 
opportunity to bring world events into 
the classroom through amateur radio. 
Peace through communications 
should be a goal for us ail. 



56 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



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RS-14 

RS-14 is up and active. It's hard to 
believe a 200 m W satellite beacon can 
be loud enough to be detected on any 2 
meter antenna with almost any 2 meter 
receiver. Launched on January 29 of 
this year, RS-l4 t also known as 
RADIOM1, RUDAK-2, or, as I intend to 
refer to it, AMSAT-OSCAR-21. has 
been sending CW telemetry on 
145.822 MHz since February. The Ger- 
man-made digital experiment has also 
been energized for tests, and the linear 
transponders should be active by the 
time this column is printed. 

In early 1989 Leonid Labutin UA3CR 
met with Hans Petef Kuftlen DK1YQ 
and other members of AMSAT-DL 
{West Germany) to propose a joint ef- 
fort m the design and construction of 
an amateur radio satellite. Leo repre- 
sented I he AMSAT-U-ORBITA group 
and the Moscow Adventure Club, both 
oftheU.S.SR. 

The groups agreed to work together 
on the program, and to design and 
build their portions of the satellite 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



in time for a scheduled launch only 
six months away. The electronics 
would become a physical part of a So- 
viet geological research satellite called 
GEOS. 

The Soviet group AMSATOQRBfTA 
worked primarily on the linear tran- 
sponders and associated telemetry 
systems. They named their pari of the 
system RADJOM1. The "M" repre- 
sents the cities involved in the pro- 
gram: Moiodechno, Minsk, Moscow 
and Munich. 

The Soviet's CW telemetry comes 
down at 20 words pet minuie, and you 
can hear it on any portable, home, or 
mobile 2 meter rig capable of CVWSSB 
reception in between the eight groups 
of four digits each, the satellite identi- 
fies itself as RS-14, From home sta- 
tions, the only obvious way to let! that 
the signal is not from a nearby Iran Emit- 
ter is to listen to the Ooppter shift on the 
signal's frequency as the satellite 
passes overhead. See Table 1 for fre- 
quency data. This is an updated ver- 
sion of the chart presented in the July 
1990"Hamsats. K ' 

The German contingent built a new 
version of their RUDAK experiment, 
RUDAK is a German acronym for 'Re- 



Table 1, RAD10-M1 /RUDAK-2 Data Sheet 
Orbit Configuration 
Polar circular orbit with average height 980 km (610 miles), inclination S3 
degrees, period 104 minutes Attached to GEOS, a Soviet geological re- 
search satellite. Launched in late January 1991 (from AMSAT-DL and 
AMSAT-U). 



Mode B Uplink 
Mode B Downlink 
CW Beacons 
PSK Beacons 



Frequency Guide 
Linear Transponder 1 
435.102-435,022 
145,852-145.932 
145.822 
145,952(1200 Dps} 



Linear Transponder 2 

435. 123-^435.043 

145.866-145.946 

145948 

145.838 (1200 bps). 



145.800(1 100 DOS) 
Regenerative Transponder RUDAK -2 



Uplink RX-1 

Frequency 435.016 

Speed 1200 

Modulation FSK 



Coding 

Downlink 

Mode 1 
Mode 2: 
Mode 3: 
Mode 4: 
ModeS: 
Mode 6: 
Mode?: 
Mode 8: 



NRZfC 
Bi-fl-M 



RX-3b 


RX-4Unit 


435J93 


435.041MHz 


9600 


DSPbps 


RSM 


any 


NR2I 


l+Q 



RX-2 RX-3a 

435.155 435.193 
2490 4800 

BPSK RSM 

Bi-0-S NRZIC 
Bi-D-M NRZ-S+scrambler 
145.983 MHz with 3 Watts typical 
(10W optional) 

1200 bps, BPSK. NRZI (NRZ-SKI^e FG-20) 
400 bps, BPSK, Bi -# - S {like OSCaR-1 3 beacon) 
2400 bps, BPSK. Bi -«-S (planned for OSCAR- 13) 
4800 bps RSM. NRZIC (Bt-0-M) 
9600 bps, RSM. NRZI (NRZ-S) 4 Scrambler 
CW keying (only for special events) 
FSK {F1 or F2B} f i e RTTY, SSTV\ FAX, etc 
FM modulated by D/A signals from DSP (speech) 

Technical Data 
DC Pow&r 

Total system: 40W maximum 

RUDAK-2 power consumption; HV @ 350 mA (max) = 4.9W 
Standby: 80 mA (RUDAK without power amplifier) 
RF Output Pow&r 
CW Beacons (UH): 2/0.4 W 
Digital Beacons (1200 bps/1 100 bps}: 4/2.0 W 
Transponders: TOW maximum 
RUDAK-2 (UH): 2/10W (3W typical) 



generative Umsetzer fur Diguale Ama- 
teurfunk Kommunikation/' or "Regen- 
erative Transponder for Digital 
Amateur Radio Communications." 
The prototype RUDAK system worked 
for over two years from the top of a 
water tower in Ismaning. near Munich, 
Germany. The first flight-ready RUDAK 
system was a part of AMSAT-OSCAR- 
13, but it had minor wiring problems 
that had a disastrous impact. The ex- 
penment was never completely activat- 
ed. 

RUDAK is a complex packet store* 
and-forward system capable of input 
and output via many modes and data 
Speeds. The original system was de- 
signed for high elliptical orbits where 
the satellite is in the sky for long peri- 
ods. It was designed to rely on real- 
time digital communications (digipeat- 
mg) wilh less emphasis on store-and- 
forward techniques. 

RUOAK-2 on A-O-21 is in a low orbit, 
similar tc the rnicrosats. It is available 
several times a day. but only for short 
periods. This new version of RUDAK is 
built for bulletin-board features and 



other experiments that lend them- 
selves to short access periods with 
much less emphasis on the drgipeattng 
capabilities. 

Many signal types could be heard on 
the RUDAK-2 downlink frequency dur- 
ing initial tests from space. On Febru- 
ary 25, stations around the worfd were 
surprised lo hear speech on the 
RUDAK-2 output of 145,983 MHz, In a 
clear voice, with a slight touch of Eu- 
ropean accent, RUDAK announced. 
"I'm completely operational and all my 
circuits are functioning perfectly." This 
message repeated continuously for 
several orbits. On other occasions, 
very -high-speed data could be heard It 
sounds like hiss trig over a span of sev- 
eral kHz, 

The RUDAK system supports FSK 
(frequency shift keying), BPSK (bi- 
phase shift keying), RSM (rectangular 
spectrum modulation) and DSP (digital 
signal processing) operation. The DSP 
system works with any input or output 
for which programs have been created 
and activated in the spacecraft com- 
puter. This includes digital rates to 2SK 





Table 2. Radio-Mi /RUDAK-2 PSK 






Telemetry decoding information. 






Digital-Telemetry of "RAD10-M1" 






by AMSA T-U (RC2CA/UA3CR) 






and AMSAT-DL (DG2CV/DB20S) 




Digital telemetry consists of 30 parameters 


+ 2 constants, To receive the 


digital telemetry, you must use an FM receiver, a modem, ; 


i de-scrambler, 


and a personal computer. 








Digital Telemetry Equations 




Line 


Parameter 


Formula 


Unit 


1 


Transponder #1 HF output pwr 


0.2N 


Watt 


2 


Transponder #1 PA temperature 


0B-N 


deg.C 


3 


DC/DC converter temperature 


03* H 


deg.C 


4 


+ 14V Regulated 


10*N 


Volt 


5 


-24V Regulated 


10*N 


Volt 


6 


+16V Regulated 


10 # N 


Volt 


7 


-r l2VRegu1aled 


10*N 


Volt 


8 


+ 9V Regulated 


10" N 


Volt 


9 


+ 7.5V Regulated 


1Q*N 


Vort 


10 


+5V Regulated 


10 # N 


Volt 


11 


+9V Regulated (linear) 


10'N 


Volt 


12 


+9V Regulated (digital) 


10 # K 


Voft 


13 


Service 


N 


• 


14 


Service 


N 


* 


15 


Transponder 92 HF output pwr 


Q.2*N 


Watt 


16 


Transponder #2 PA temperature 


0,8 *N 


deg.C 


17 


+24V Regulated 


10*N 


Volt 


18 


+ 16V Regulated 


10-N 


Volt 


19 


+ 10V Regulated 


10"N 


Volt 


20 


+9V Regulated 


10*W 


Volt 


21 


+7.5V Regulated 


1Q*N 


Volt 


22 


Status command link 1 


* 


• 


23 


Status command Jink 2 


• 


• 


24 


Status command Jink 


■ 


■ 


25 


Status command link 


* 


• 


26 


RPC +5VforRurJaft-l 


2.47* N 


von 


27 


RPC +5V for Rudak-RTX 


2.47* N 


Voll 


28 


RPC *5VforRamdlsk 


2.47* N 


Voft 


29 


RPC - 14V total supply current 


627 289 "N 


mA 


30 


RPC module temperature 


56.7^-49.5 


deg. C 


31 


"Zero" 1 of the comparator 


OC 




32 


Reference vol 1 age 


6D 




N 


» g - ' ' where T is the parameter value in hex formal, 
bU ^UL 


Or N 


— * where V is the parameter value in decimal format 
96 


RPC— Ruttak Power Conditioner 







58 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 59 



bps, voice, and other modes not yet 
invented. 

The linear transponders were nol ac- 
tivated for use early in the satellite's 
life, but with several watts available for 
transponder activity, A-O-21 promises 
lo be extremely easy to work, The 
transponders, configured in Mode S. 
are inverting, A 70cm lower-sideband 
uplink signal is retransmitted on upper- 
sideband. Similarly, a signal sent in the 
lower portion of the uplink band will be 
heard high \n the 2 meter downlink 
span. Omnidirectional antennas will be 
sufficient for those wishing to use the 
satellite, 

Decoding A-O-21 telemetry provides 
insight into the satellite's systems. 
While the equations (or the CW data 
have not yet been released , the digital 
telemetry can be deciphered with data 
from Table 2. The 1200 bps (bits per 
second) PSK beacons can be translat- 
ed by PSK/packet systems capable of 
receiving Fuji-OSGAR-20'9 digital 
mode or the micros a I downlink signals 

The 1 100 bps transmissions are not 
as easy. Although this signaling rate is 
a standard In the Soviei Union, it is 
nonexistent in the U.S. A DSP (digital 
signal processing) device with a 
modem program for 1 100 bps PSK is 
the best alternative. 

RS-12/13 

On February 5, 1 991 , one week after 
the launch of RS-14/A-0-21, Cosmos 
2123 went to orbit It is a replacement 
for Cosmos 1 655 which has been oper- 
ational since May 30< 1985 The new 
Cosmos is a civilian navigation satellite 
and incorporates RS-12/13 into the 
main power bus. The older satellite did 
not require replacement as early as 
previously anticipated, SO launch was 
delayed for over a year. 

Table 3 shows an updated version 
of the amateur radio frequency chart 
that originally appeared rn the Septem- 
ber 19S9 "Hamsats " Like RS- 10/11, 
RS-12/13 has three main modes and 
associated ROBOT auloiransponders. 
Frequency bands have been offset 



Table 3. RS-12/13 Frequency and Data Sheet 




Orbtt Configuration 




Polar circular orbit with average height 980 km (610 miles}, inclination 83 


degrees, period 104 minutes Attached to Cosmos 2123. a Soviet naviga- 


tional satellite {NAVSAT). 


Launched in February 1991 from Soviet command 


station RS3A. 


Frequency Guide 






RS 12 


RS-13 


Mode A Uplink 


145.910-145.950 


145.960-146.000 


Downlink 


29.410-29.450 


29 460-29.500 


Mode K Uplink 


21.210-21.250 


21,260-21.300 


Downlink 


29.410-29.450 


29,460-29.500 


Mode T Uplink 


21.210-21,250 


21,260-21.300 


Downlink 


145.910-145.950 


145.960-146.000 


Mode KA Uplinks 


21,210-21.250 


21,260-21,300 




145.910^145,950 


145.960-146,000 


Downlink 


29.410-29.450 


29460-29.500 


Mode KT Uplink 


21.21(^21.250 


21,260-21300 


Downlinks 


29,410-29.450 


29.460^29.500 




145,910-145.950 


145.960-146.000 


Beacons 


29 .408-29. 454 


29.456-29.504 




145912-145959 


145.862-145.908 




Autoanswer ROBOT 




Modes 


A, K r T, KA. KT 


A,K.T,KA,KT 


Uplink 


21.129 and/or 145.B31 


21.138 and/or 145 .840 


Downlink 


29.454 and/or 145.956 
Technical Data 


29,504 and/or 145.908 


DC Power 






AN system OFF 


4.6W 


3.5W 


All system ON (max) 


35W 


25W 


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Beacon and Robot (UH) 


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8W 


3W 



to avoid interference with RS-10/n, 
but otherwise the new system is fdenti- 
caJ. 

During the first few days of life in 
orbit. RS-1 2 and RS-13 systems were 
checked for proper operation. Tests 
were going well until ihe Cosmos 2123 
150 MHz transmitter began interfering 
with the RS-1 2 2 meter receiver. Digital 
signals heard within the RS-1 2 10 me* 
ter downlink were obviously not or an 
amateur origin. Efforts have been un- 
derway by command stations to cir- 
cumvent this problem. If the satellite's 
2 meter receive predicament contin- 
ues, RS-13 may reactivated, or Modes 



K (15 meters up and 10 meters down) 
or T (15 meters up and 2 meters down J 
on RS-1 2 may be turned on instead. 

Mode A operation requires an uplink 
signal, either CW or sideband, within 
the passband limits on 2 meters. Ten 
watts to a home station omnidirectional 
antenna does the job on most passes. 
A 10 meter receiver with a mosfet 
preamp and dipole will work for the 
downlink, 

The 10 meter downlink resides just 
above 29.4 MHz. Interference from ter- 
restrial FM stations is very common in 
this portion of the band. Many hams 
are nol aware ot the internationally ac- 



cepted satellite downlink band limits of 
29,3 to 29,51 MHz, FM receivers can 
barely detect the presence Of the weak 
sideband and CW s<gnais from the 
satellites. An uninformed FM operator 
with a strong signal can wipe out sever- 
al satellite con versal ions and not even 
notice that a senous problem exists. 
The ARRL "Operating Manual" clearly 
defines the 10 meter band plan with 
extracts from the ITU (international 
Telecommunications Union) Radio 
Regulations Table of Frequency Allo- 
cations. 

Mode K with its 15 meter upfink and 
10 meter downlink Is a mode where 
many newcomers make their first satel- 
lite contact. Although it is difficult to 
avoid interference between a 21 MHz 
transmitter and a 29 MHz receiver at a 
home station, it is possible. Many have 
done it. Transmit and receive antennas 
must be kept segregated to avoid re- 
ceiver overload. Coax cables should 
be of good quality and kepi apart. Fi- 
nally, transmitter power on the 15 me- 
ter uplink should be only enough to 
make contact through the Iranspon* 
der. There is no band plan for 15 meter 
satellite operation. When calling 
"CO/' specify "satelfite" or "RS." 

Interference between the 15 meter 
transmitter and 2 meter receiver Is 
rarely a problem for Mode T activity. 
The downlink signals are easy to copy* 
but there is a problem with this mode 
for U.S. amateurs. The transponder 
limits on RS-10/11 allowed Novice 
class operation, but RS-12/13 does 
not. Only Advanced and Extra class 
hams can use Mode T via RS-12/13. 
Those with an Extra class license can 
use sideband or CW anywhere within 
the transponders, but Advanced class 
hams must avoid operation below 
21 ,225 MHz. Consider upgrading! 

Even with license limitations, RS-12/ 
13 offers exciting satellite communica- 
tions. Together with A-O-21 , the scope 
of amateur satellite activity has been 
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6 tapes for speed building from 13 
to 22 wpm for the Extra code exam. 



#13 BRASS KEY &0SC. . 
#15 PLASTIC KEY & OSC. 



S25.95 
$21.95 



SINGLE CODE TAPES 

$10.95 each including shipping 

#19 5 wpm Novice QSO tests 

#20 5 wpm Random Code 

#21 5-7 wpm Speed Builder 

#22 7-10 wpm Speed Builder 

#23 10 wpm Plateau Breaker 

#24 10*12 wpm Speed Builder 

#25 12*15 wpm Calls & Numbers 

#26 13 wpm Random Code 

#27 13 wpm Test Preparation 

#28 13 wpm Car Code 

#29 13-15 wpm Speed Builder 

#30 15*17 wpm Speed Builder 

#31 17-19 wpm Speed Builder 

#32 20 wpm Random Code 

#33 20 wpm Test Preparation 

#34 20 wpm Car Code 

#43 3-15 wpm Code Review 

#40 12-21 wpm Code Review 



Pt terns, include 
(flipping & handling 
IL rfrfidtnts add 6Mr% 




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THE ORIGINAL 



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previous sessions, cut and paste text between 
sessions (also between modes on pk232). Brag 
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THE RF CONNECTION 



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* Programmable Mike/Channel Buttons 

* Programmable Transmit Freq» Limits 

* Extended Frequency Range nut* **«****■) 

* Priority Channel 

* Split Frequency 

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73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 61 



Ne 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



IV PRODUCTS 




ISD 

ISD has introduced the world's first 
implementation of nonvolatile analog 
storage on a chip. The IS0 101 6, a sin- 
gle-chip voice messaging system, 
offers up to 16 seconds of telephone- 
grade voice recording and playback. 
With the addition of a microphone, 
speaker and just a couple of resistors 



Compiled by Hope Currier 



and capacitors, you have an audio 
recorder on a chip! Applications can 
range from simple repeater IDs to 
voice mailbox systems, Multiple ICs 
can be cascaded for additional storage 
time. Twelve-second and 20- second 
versions are available as well (ISD1012 
and ISD 1020}. The ISD1016 rep- 
resents an exceptionally tiny solu- 
tion with a mmiscule energy budget, 
true zero-power nonvolatile storage ar- 
ray and extremely easy-to-use fea- 
tures. 

For prices and more information* 
contact Information Storage Devices, 
fnc. 2841 Junction Avenue, Suite 204, 
San Jose CA 95134; (800) 825-^473, 
(408) 428- J400, FAX (408) 428-1422. 
Or Circle Reader Service No, 201 . 



POLYPHASER 

PolyPhaser Corporation has added 
a new series of Nuclear Electro-Mag- 
netic Pulse (N EM P) lightning suppres- 
sors to their popular line of coax protec- 
tors- The IS-NEMP series has threaded 
lype *'N" connectors standard on all 
equipment port tnterlaces. They han- 
dle up to a maximum surge of 50,000 
amps with a £ 1.25 ns turn-on time, 
and 330 VDC voltage- They also have 
multi-strike capabilities, ^ 1*1:1 
VSWR. s 0.1 dB IL t and throughput 
energy of ^ 30p Joules (based on 1 
kWns waveform^ 

For prices and more information, 
contact PolyPhaser Corporation, P.O. 







Box 9000, Minden NV 89423-9000; 
(800) 325-7170 or (702) 782-251 1. Or 
circfe Reader Service Mo, 202. 



COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIALISTS 

Communications Specialists is offer- 
ing a miniature multi-tone encoder that 
permits selection of a discrete CTCSS 
or hurst tone from a custom 12 (Mode* 
SS-12) or 16 (Mode* SS-16) tone mem- 
ory. The tone is activated by a rotary 
encoder switch mounted on the board. 
In place of 1 he usual DIP switch found 
on the old SS-32P encoder, these new 
boards have a 12- or 16*pole rotary 
encoder switch mounted on the bottom 
of the board. Up to 12 or 16 tones of 
your choice are programmed into the 
EEPROM before shipment, and can be 
changed later at no charge. The smalt 
size (1 .3" H x 0,9" W x 73' 0) allows 
for panel-mount installation in most 
base stations and many mobile radios. 

The SS-12 and SS-16 are priced at 
$39,95 each. Contact Communica* 



tions Specialists, Inc., 426 West Taft 
A venue. Orange CA 92665-4296; (800) 
854^0547, (714) 99&-302U PAX (714) 
974-3420 Or circle Reader Service 
No. 207, 




EDWARD OROS 

Edward Oros has released a conver- 
sion kit for the Urnden HR2600 and 
2510 10m band radios, allowing them 
to transmit on 12m, making them dual- 
banders. The "Plus 12" conversion kit 
is easy to assemble and install — no 
drilling required! The total conversion 



time is less than one bout. All required 
parts and instructions are supplied 
with the kit 

The kit sells for S49.95, plus 6°/b 
sales tax for PA residents. Group dis- 
counts are available, Contact Edward 
Oros, 2629 Sapling Dr., Attison Park 
PA 15101. Or circle Reader Service 
No 203 




DELTA RESEARCH 

Oelta Research has introduced 
DELTATONE 2.0™, the perfect com- 
plement to your repeater controller. 
The DELTATONE interface (hooks up 
to your computer's printer port) and 
your MS-DOS computer offer unlimited 
1 6-digit DTMF tone generation for local 
or remote programming of the repeater 
controller. DELTATONE has three pro- 
grammable tone speed settings, It ac- 
cepts programming information from a 
control file created on your favorite PC 
word processor. Commands and com- 



ments can be freely mixed within the 
file. Its command language allows 
complete ffexibiNty of tone selection, 
three sending speeds, selectable one- 
second delay between digits, a pause 
(tone off) until a key is pressed and, for 
level calibration, it will hold the lasl digit 
on until a key is pressed, tt also has 
Morse code identification capability. 

DELTATONE 2.0 is priced at $149, 
plus shipping and handling. Contact 
Delta Research. P.O. Box 13677, 
Wauwatosa W\ 53213; (414} 353- 
4567. Or circle Reader Service No. 
205. 



TRIPP LITE 

A new. compact UL-listed battery 
backup system from Tnpp Lite, featur- 
ing 450 VA of power and LAN compati- 
bility, off ere superior performance for 
PC work stations, The BC-450 LAM 
Battery Backup System is UL-hsted un- 
der UL-1778 (UPS systems) and sup- 
plies 450 V A of continuous power while 
providing complete spike, line noise 
and RFI/EMI filtering. 

The BC-450 LAN. priced at $449. is 
part of Tripp Lite's new family of small 
UL-tisted battery backup systems, also 
available in 275 VA and 375 VA sizes. 
Contact Tripp Lite, 500 N. Orleans, 
Chicago ii 60610-4188; (312) 329- 




1777, FAX (312) 644-6505. Or circle 
Reader Service No, 206. 



CHIPSWITCH 

The CHIPSWITCH is designed to ex- 
pand the existing features of the 
Uniden HR2&10/HR2600/LINCOLN 
10m radios. It features 30 memory 
Channels with temporary channel 
lockout and repeater off sels, program- 
mable SCAN/SEEK function, program- 
mable channel UP/DN buttons, pro- 
grammable microphone UP/DN 
buttons, programmable transmitter 
timeout, split frequency operation, pro- 
grammable transmit frequency range, 
and priority channel operation (re- 
quires additional hardware) . 

CHIPSWITCH retails for $59,95. 
plus postage, including the Operator's 
Manual and Installation Guide. An op- 
tional chip socket ($7.50) and priority 
channel board ($29.75) are also avail- 



able, Contacl CHIPSWITCH. 4773 
Sonoma Hwy., Suite 132. Santa Rosa 
CA 95409-4269; (801) 224-U30. Or 
circle Reader Sen/ice No. 204. 



THE GRAPEVINE GROUP 

The Grapevine Group's new catalog 
of computer parts and accessories in- 
cludes the hard to find spare pans and 
upgrades that Commodore C-64 own- 
ers need. This 34-page catalog comes 
in two editions one for end users, and 
one for dealers. 

Contact The Grapevine Group fnc, 3 
Chestnut Street Suffem NY 10901; 
(914)357-2424, (800)292-7445, FAX 
(914) 357-6243 Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 208 



62 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



Number 22 on your Feedback card 



Upda tes 



International Radio 
and Computer, Inc. 

Robert A. Pohorence, President of 
the above company, writes: "We 
have closed our operation at the Port 
St. Lucie location and consolidated 
our business and personnel al our 
new headquarters in Fort Pierce . 
The new address is 3804 South U.S. 
1, Fort Pierce Ft 34982. The tele- 
phone numbers are (407) 4S9-5609 
and 879-6868; the FAX number is 
(407) 464-6386. Also, as of January 
1 + 1991, international Radio and 
Computer, Inc., bought the Fox Tan- 
go trade name and assets." 

C-64 & 1541 Drive 12V Conversion 

John Neeley K6YDW writes: '*Fol- 
lowing is an update on my article, 
"064 & 1541 Drive 12V Conver- 
sion," that appeared in the July 1 990 
issue of 73, pages 26-30, 

' 1 Ramsey Electronics no longer 
carries the TB-6 60 Hz Time Base kit. 
If you need it for the project, you can 
build the home-brew version in Fig- 
ure 3. 

"2. In some instances, depending 
on the terminal program or TNC you 
use, this 60 Hz clock is not required. 
Do the power wiring conversion first, 
then try it out to see whether this is 
the case, The clock is probably not 
required if you don't use the disk 
drive, such as when you use the AEA 
PK-88 and Digi-Cart programs. This 
was brought to my attention by read- 
ers who did the conversion. " 

More on the Frequency Standard 

Refer to the article, "High Preci- 
sion Frequency Standard;" by John- 
son in the January 1991 issue, and 
the March "Updates" on same, Ed- 
ward E. Surkhardt of WRTV: "Paul: 
Typical expected Doppler shifts of 
domeshc geostationary satellites 
cause frequency shifts in the order 
oM * 10^ which result in color burst 
changes of 0,03579 Hz from the ori- 
gin point— not 'about 1 Hz/ 

"Even in Los Angeles or New 
York, color burst can be used only it 
the station's frame synchronizer ts 
also tied to the atomic standard. 

'You [PaulJ mentioned your sta- 
tion is locked to WWV 60 Hz as a 



condition of license. The 60 kHz 
calls are WWVB. Phase-locking to 
WVWB results in frequency errors 
on the order of 1 x 10^ during day- 
time propagation changes. Please 
tell me more about your 'condition of 
license' to be iocked to WWVB— this 
ts a new one to me. 

"Brad: You should not have used 
the word 'percent' in p 2.79x 10 to the 
minus 6th percent'. Rather it should 
read/2.79xlD*. " 

Dual Voltage Bench Supply 

Angus E, Smiley: "In your Octo- 
ber 1990 issue, page 10, 'Dual 
Voltage Bench Supply,' you never 
give a part number for 01 , the NPN 
transistor. I'd like to know what it is . " 

Hugh Welts W6WTU, the author, 
says you may use a common 
2N2222 or2N3904. Either will work 
fine. — Eds. 

The Switcher-Driver 

As promised in WB6lGP*s "Above 
and Beyond" column in this issue: 
The schematic for his home-brew 
power supply switcher-driver. The 
foil pattern and parts placement 
diagrams are in the August 1990 
issue. 



Switcher- Driver Parts List 

R1 151c 1/4W 

R2 25k pot 

R3 220 ohm 1/4W 

R4,5 f 6 5 ohm 1/4W 



C1 A5 
C2 



Q1 
02 

U1 

U2 



0.1 pF 

select 0.1 uF for 60 Hz 
capacitor: can vary 
from 0. 1-0.12 uF with 
a resistor value of 
38k (25k pot + 15k} 
pot; allows frequency 
adjustment, 

IRFP14QFET100V 
@32 amps max 
1RFP140 
approx. 200W max 

CMOS 4047 
multivibrator 
CMOS 4049 
Hex inverter 



1777 



*1 



ts. 

lOr.F 



HI 



7t — 

3£«#J [aFP-140 



1 



n 



oi 



1MT J 



! * 



*& 



*.*.* 



* ii -* 



2 IP * * J 






ptbn 

i.^.e.ii ^-"^ 



IBS 

set 



« 



Hj.,iE.lS>li 



♦Ottt'^i* rQi»«= soil* 




X at 



4tMf 



1 1 1 -. i- 



Qi»* 



fMCm 



Schematic for the power supply switcher-driver in the August t990 "Above and 
Beyond " 



Computer Controlled Ham Shack for personal or club system 
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"Operate duplex or Simplex' Load, save, change all 
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vocabulary 'Voice dock eiecuies events Daily A 
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when logging on* Voltage proportional courtesy beeps 
gives indication of signet strength * 18 rotating Polite 
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T. tone control trom remote audio monitored 'User da- 
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*Adddupl#i Control of fi*- 
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Plugs Into CS&4S board, TLCN T „, S15&,95 




Autoboot FPROM can 
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Works in all H.T.s 



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Analog to dqtad 

CSBwfiHOtl 

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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 63 



Rttyloop 



Number 23 on your Feedback card 



Marc I Leavey. M>D.> WASAJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Baltimore MO 21208 

Amateur Radio Software 

With construction and gadgets the 
major topic of this month's 73. we'll 
concentrate on a type or gadget here <n 

RTTY Loop/* To wit, I'd like to 
present some of ihe most requested 
"gadgets" RTTY software 

The following information was ob- 
tained mostly from flyers supplied by 
software vendors or, in some cases, 
from reviews in QST, Please check 
with the vendors for the latest product 
details and pricing. 

Apple It Amateur Radio Software 

List compiled by NGBtS, last updat- 
ed 1/7/91 , (These products are not en- 
dorsed by Apple Computer. tncO 

Packet Radio APR (Apple Packet 
Radio), For use with TNG -2s. Requires 
a Super Serial card in the computer. 
Larry East W1HUE, P.O. Box 51445, 
Idaho Falls ID 83405-1445 Send a 
blank 3.5-inch or 525-inch Apple II 
disk and a stamped, self- ad dressed 
disk mailer. 

PACHAM, Uses a two- microchip in- 
terface instead of a TNC. DaJu Devel- 
opment Company, 39 Long Ridge 
Road, Carlisle MA 01741 Price, 
$49.95. 

M o rse Code Pract i ce Morse A Pius 
Morse Code Tutor EPO Software, 
7805 NE t47ih Avenue, Vancouver 
WA 98682. Price, $15.95. 

Note: The Sept. 7, 1990, ARRL Letter 
mentioned that the Computer Founda- 
tion for Handicapped Children has 
some Morse code programs for the dis- 
abled. Contact them at 2645 East 
Southern, Tempe AZ 85282 for details. 

Morse Code & RTTY Operation 
HAM. Sends and receives both Morse 
code and RTTY, DaJu Development 
Company, 39 Long Ridge Road, Car- 
lisle MA 01741 . Price, $49.95. 

Code Machine, COTEC, 13462 
H amnions Ave,, Saratoga CA 95070, 
Price, $29.95 (discount if bought with 
another COTEC program). 

RTTY Machine. COTEC, as above. 
Price, $29.95 (discount if bought in 
conjunction with another COTEC pro- 
gram},. 

Satellite Tracking Apple Quik- 
Trak. AM SAT. P.O. Box 27, Washing- 
ton, DC 20044 Price. $25 for AMSAT 
members; $35 for non-members. 

Antenna Design Antenna Design 
& Dimensions. EPO Software, 7805 
NE 147th Avenue, Vancouver WA 
986B2. Price* $9,95, 

Antenna Trap Designing. Larry East 
W1HUE, 119-7 Buekland St M Plants- 
ville, CT 06479. Send blank formatted 
disk with stamped, self -addressed re- 
turn disk mailer 

Logging Efectrolog ti EPO Soft- 
ware, 7805 NE 147th Avenue, Vancou- 
ver WA 9B682 Pnce. St 8.95. 



Amateur Radio Teletype 

Contest Log £ Dupe Sheet EPO 
Software, as above. Price, $13,95. 

Macintosh Amateur Radio Software 

List compiled by N6BIS; last updat- 
ed 1 1/24/90, 

Packet Radio NET/Mac (KA9Q 
TCP/fP}. Supports AX.25 and NET/ 
ROM as well as TCP/IP functions. Re- 
quires a TNC with KISS mode Doug 
Thorn N60YU, 1405 Graywood Drive. 
San Jose CA 95129, Send formatted 
800 K Macintosh disk with stamped, 
self-addressed return disk mailer. Also 
available via anonymous FTP from ap- 
ple.com (/pub/ham-radio) and platy- 
pus.uofs.edu (/pub/BAM -RADIO); on 
the Digikmn Systems BBS at (408) 
253-1309. Ihe WB3FFV BBS al (301) 
625-0817, 625-9482, and 625-9663; 
and the N8EMR BBS at (614) 695- 
2553 (or wa AMPR.NET FTP at 44.70. 
0.1). The KA9Q package is copyright- 
ed, but free for noncommercial use. 

MacRatt with FAX, Terminal pro- 
gram for use with AEA T s PK-232 multi- 
mode controller. Supports packet, CW. 
RTTY, AMTOR, and facsimile, In- 
cludes computer-to-TNC cable. Ad- 
vanced Electronic Applications (AEA), 
P.O. Box C-216Q, Lynnwood WA 
98036. Price, $59.95. 

Morse Code Practice N6MZV 
Morse Trainer RT Martin, N6MZV. 
10382 Orange Avenue, Cupertino CA 
95014 Also available via anonymous 
FTP from appte,com (/pub/ham-r adio). 
Price, S25.00 

Morse Tutor. Jack Brindle WA4FIB, 
Brincomm Technology, 3155 Resin 
Streel, Marietta GA 30066, Send for- 
matted 800K Macintosh disk with 
stamped, self-addressed return disk 
mailer. The program is copyrighted, 
but free for noncommercial use. 

MacMorse. David A Kail, 700 
Marine Parkway #314, New Port 
Rkrhey FL 34652. Price, $29.95. 

Zihua Morse. Zihua. P.O. Box 
51601 , Pacific Grove CA 93950, Price 
$39 .95 without speech synthesis; $65 
with speech synthesis. 

RTTY MacTTY. Summit Con- 
cepts, Suite 102-190, 1840 41st Ave,, 
Capitola CA 9501 0. Price, $39,95. 

Logging LOGic. Personal Data- 
base Applications, 2634 Meadow Bend 
Court. DuluthGA3013& Price. $75,00, 

FDLogf System One Control, 3900 
85th Ave N, Suite 200, Brooklyn Park 
MN 55443. Price, $29.95 

Satellite Tracking OuikMac. 
AMSAT, P.O. Box 27. Washington, DC 
20044, Price. $40 for AMSAT mem- 
bers; $50 for non-members. Requires 
Microsoft BASIC. 

Satellite Orbit Prediction Program, 
Macintosh conversion of W3IWI pro- 
gram. Earl Skelton. N3ES, 631 1 29th 
Place NW. Washington DC 20015. 
Send formatted BOOK Macintosh disk 
with stamped, self-addressed return 
disk mailer; or send SASE for source 
listing. Requires Microsoft BASIC. 



MacSat. BEK Developers, 1732 74th 
Circle NE. St. Petersburg FL 33702 
Pnce. Si 0.00. 

MacSat 3.0. Geodetk; Research Ser- 
vices Lid., P.O. Box 3643, Station 8. 
Fredericton, N.B. E3A 5L7, Canada. 
Price, $50.00 (add $10.00 for airmail 
postage and handling). 

Satellite Helper. MacTrak Software, 
P.O. Box 1590, Port Orchard WA 
98366. Price. $59.95. 

Satellite Pro* MacTrak Software, as 
above. Price, $99*95. 

Propagation, Gray Line, OX Head- 
ings DX Window. Creates on-screen 
an azimuthal equidistant projection 
(great circle) world map centered on 
your QTH. with day/nighl terminator 
Engineering Systems, Inc.. P.O. Box 
939. Vienna VA 22183, Price, $39,95. 

Skycom hi. Enter solar flux and get 
propagation predictions to desired ar- 
eas of the world. Engineering Systems, 
foe., as above. Price, $39,95 {$59.95 
with Skycom 1 5). 

Skycom 1.5. Provides sunlight 
slams at both ends of (he path: MUF r 
FGF2, and FOT frequencies; S/N ratio 
of the link, and other information. Engi- 
neering Systems, Inc, . as above. Price, 
$39,95 ($59.95 with Skycom 1.1). 

DX Helper, MacTrak Software, P.O. 
Box 1590, Port Orchard WA 98336. 
Price. $34.95. 

Sun Clock, Desk accessory. Dis- 
plays a map of the world with day and 
night areas. MLT Software, P.O. Box 
98041, 6325 SW Capitol Highway, 
Portland OR 97201 . Price, $1 7.00. 

Radio Control ICQM tC-735 Con* 
trot, KE6FG Software, 9763 Pali Ave.. 
Tujunga CA 91042, Pnce. $49,95 

Test Preparation Ham Stacks. 
HyperCard stacks containing all of the 
questions in the current question pool 
for each license class. Diana Syriac 
N1GZS, 49A Meadow Pond Drive, 
Leominster MA 01453, Send two for- 
matted 800K Macintosh disks with 
stamped, self-addressed return disk 
mailer, Also available via anonymous 
FTP from the pub/ham- radio directo- 
ries on appte.com and platy- 
pus .uofs.edu. 

Collections and Miscellany 
MacNet Pubtic-domain programs (cur* 
rently on nine disks) contributed by 
Macintosh packet users, includes test 
preparation, contest logging, propaga- 
tion prediction, satellite tracking, and 
amateur television. John D. Seney 
KB1HE, 144 Pepperidge Dr., Man- 
chester NH 03103. Send formatted 
800K Macintosh disks with stamped, 
self-addressed return disk mailer. Con- 
tributions of public -domain programs 
encouraged, 

"Project Mac. " Contest logging, an- 
tenna design, satellite tracking, dip 
an, etc. Microsoft BASIC required for 
many (but not all) of the programs. 

Stan Horzepa WA1LOU, 75 Kreger 
Drive, Wolcotl CT 06716. Send three 
formatted 800K Macintosh disks with 
stamped, self-addressed return disk 
mailer. 

Amateur Radio Software for Macin- 
tosh Extensive catalog including log- 
ging. Morse code, Novice, gray-line, 
satellite tracking, contesting, packet. 



and CW programs. ZCo Corporation. 
P.O. Box 3720, Nashua NH 03061. 

Amateur Radto ft Contains satellite 
tracking, Morse code practice. Ohm's 
taw calculator, and pad design pro- 
grams, Kinetic Designs, P.O. Box 
1646, Orange Park FL 32067. Price, 
$4.00. 

Red Ryder 9,4, Terminal emulation 
program, suitable for packet radio. Ki- 
netic Designs, P.O. Box 1646. Orange 
Park FL 32067. Price, $4.00. 

MacScience BBS* Various ham-re- 
iated applications, including antenna 
design, propagation. WE FAX. packet, 
and Morse code. Tel. (408) 86G-4933. 

Digikron Systems BBS, Various 
ham-related applications, including 
logging, propagation, Morse code, and 
packet Tel (408)253-1309. 

WB3FFV BBS. Various ham-related 
software, including packet, contesting, 
and Morse code applications. Tel. 
(301) 625-0817. 625-9482, and 625- 



N3EMR BBS. Various ham- related 
files, including packet, Morse code, 
DXing, and contesting software; 
AMSAT bulletins; and several ham 
newsletters. Tel (614) 895-2553, Also 
available on AMPR.NET at 44.70.0.1 . 

Tandy Color Computer Software 

List compiled by N1 ENA, last updat- 
ed 1/15/91. 

CoCoPACT (tor 64K CoCot or Co- 
Co2) and CoPACT3 (for CoCo3). Man* 
ty W\ Haley WJ5W, Rte. t, Box 210-B, 
Evening Shade AR 72532-9735. Mike 
purchased this package about a year 
ago and it came with free PBBS soft^ 
ware. Both programs t\a>/e split screen 
operation, 40k QSO buffer, 10 macros, 
and an editor tor oW-line use. CoPACT3 
(for CoCo3 only} uses 80-coiumn dis- 
play, additional 24 K buffer, and option- 
al 2400 baud serial port data rate. 
Price, $21.95 postpaid for both pro- 
grams. 

CoCoPacket. Brian Carling. 5131 
Raywood Lane, Nashville TN 37211. 
Mike never tried l his program It's men- 
tioned in the packet software list on 
page 5-5 of the ARRL's Your Gateway 
To Packet Radio book. Price unknown. 

SMARTY2 (for CoCo3). James A. 
San! ord WB4GCS/N NN0HDF, 20 Glen 
Forest Drive, Hampton VA 23669, This 
is a RTTY program lor the CoCo3 with 
an external terminal unit. It has split 
screen, SELCAL, several Baudot 
speeds and 300 baud ASCII. Mike 
bought this one about two years ago 
Price, $15.00. 

S8S; Thermal Fusion BBS, 
Greenville SC. {803} 862-7544, 300- 
9600 baud, SN1 , This is a free Ham/ 
OS9 BBS with CoCo ham radio pro* 
grams posted on it 

My sincere thanks to Patty Winter 
N68IS and Mike Nadeau N1ENA for 
the information presented this month. 
No doubt there are more such pro- 
grams 'somewhere out there.'* And 
as you, the loyal readership, let me 
know about them, I'll be sure to share 
the information with Ihe rest of you I 
Meanwhile, I've got more goodies on 
tap for next month, so dont miss that 
edition of '"RTTY Loop"! 



$4 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 




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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1951 65 



Ho 



Number 24 on y our Feedback card 



M//VG //v 



Joe Moeit PE K0OV 
PO Box 2508 
Futterton CA 92633 

T-Hunting Stolen Cars 

Radio direction finding (RDF) began 
as a way of finding the positron of ships 
during Wortd War I. The first transmit- 
ter hunters were sailors. Then the mili- 
tary put it to work locating aircraft and, 
as a result. RDF played a vital role in 
World War II, Later, searctvand<escue 
crews T the FCC. and ham radio opera* 
tors discovered its usefulness. 

Now, RDF has become the latest tool 
of local law enforcement. Peace offi- 
cers across the country are learning to 
T-hunt, and I hey 1 re excited about it. 

in 1978. an entrepreneur named BUI 
Reagan wondered if RDF technology 
could reliably locate stolen cars and 
hijacked eighteen- wheelers. He and 
Sheldon ApseU, an engineer and radio 
ham, developed the concept and 
called it "LoJack *V to contrast with 



«♦ 



It took five years to design the equip- 
ment, and another two years to prove 
the feasibility of a wide-area RDF 
dragnet to authorities in their home 
state, Massachusetts. Test hunts Of 
800 simulated stolen vehicles had a 
100 percent success rale, averaging 
11 minutes homing time. In July 1986, 
me system became available to the 
public, Today there are 300 police cars 
with DF units, and 70,000 vehicle 
transmitters, in Massachusetts. 

LoJack expanded into southeast 
Florida in 198B. then into New Jersey 
and southern Michigan, Southern Cali- 
fornia went on line last summer, and 
Chicago four months later. 

The new Southern California Stolen 
Vehicle Recovery Network (SVRN) 
represents a $1.7 million investment 
for LoJack. The company donated the 
SVRN computer software and police 
RDF units. But the investment should 
pay off well, because the SVRN could 
lake a big bite out of the auto then 
industry here. 

Over 129,000 vehicles are stolen in 
Los Angeles County every year, which 
works out to one every four minutes. 
Average loss per theft is $6,000. With 
an extensive ad campaign on televi- 
sion and in new car dealer showrooms. 
LoJack hopes to install 20.000 trans- 
mitters in the first year of business 
here, and expand the SVRN to other 
Southern California counties 

Cops Turn On the T 

To prevent false alarms, the LoJack 
unit (LJU) is independent of any other 
alarms in the car, The transmitter is 
lurned on only by police, and only a her 
the owner reports that the vehicle has 
been stolen. The whole process is au- 
tomatic 

When police routinely enier a vehicle 
into the C LETTS state- wide stolen vehi- 
cle computer system, the information 



Radio Direction Finding 

is transmitted to the special SVRN 
computer at police headquarters via a 
9,600 baud landline link. The SVRN 
computer checks its data base to see if 
there is a LoJack match to the stolen 
vehicle's ID number. If so. Sector Acti- 
vation Transmitters {SATs) broadcast 
a coded message to the LJU, causing it 
to start transmitting once every 15 sec- 
onds. The entire activation process 
takes about a minute. 

Seven SAT sites ringing Los Ange- 
les County, with 300 watts ERR at each 
site, insure that the UU will be activat- 
ed, unless the thieves have driven it 
into an RF screen room. The activation 
code is sent twice, five minutes apart, 
then repeated every hall hour for good 
measure. 

To save power and to prevent inter- 
fering with any DFing in progress, the 
UU goes into a low duty transmit mode 
when the vehicle is first reported sto- 
len, When the car's transmitter is first 
heard by a police cruiser, the officer 
radios headquarters, giving the five- 
character code from the RDF display. 
The linked computers respond with the 
vehicle ID and description, so the offi- 
cer knows what he's DFing, 

This inquiry also causes the SATs to 
broadcast a ' query mode" message to 
the LJU. That increases the transmit 
rate to once per second, to speed up 
the homing process, Afte* the vehicle 
is recovered, the computer tells the 
SATs to deactivate the UU. and reset 
it to be ready for use again if needed. 

The police need not know if a stolen 
car has LoJack when they enter it into 
the CLETS computer. The SVRN com- 
puter does not alert police when it 
sends out an activation- A LoJack T- 
hunt doesn't start until the signal 
shows up on the RDF set (called a PTC) 
in an officer's vehicle. At that time, the 
officer knows he is only a few mites 
away from the hot car. 

Hundreds of Hunters 

It's hard for a thief to elude the 
system: 485 police and sheriff cruisers 
in Los Angeles County have PTCs. 
That's over 50 percent more than in 
Massachusetts, even though Los 
Angeles County is 
one-third the size of 
the Bay State. Instal- 
lations are being 
planned for police 
helicopters and boats, 
too. All but one of 
the law enforcement 
agencres in Los An- 
geles County are par- 
ticipating in the pro- 
gram. 

Micrologic Corpo- 
ration makes the 
PTCs, which use 
' pseudo-doppler" 
technology in the 
VHF "high band." 
between ISO and 174 



MHz The electronically -rotating an- 
tenna array has four whips , in a square 
pattern, on the squad car's roof. The 
display unit (see the photo) resembles 
the commercial VHF Doppler RDF sets 
for sale to hams and mariners. It has a 
16-LED direction indicator, S-meter, 
and five-character readout. 

The PTC is more sophisticated than 
a typical Doppler RDF set. It gets a 
bearing on each transmission burst, 
holds it, and displays the code of the 
vehicle on the five-character readout. 
All activated LJUs transmit on the 
same frequency, Officers can get bear- 
ings on more than one car at a time, 
distinguishing them by their unique 
codes on the d isplay To prevent confu- 
sion when closing m, the PTC can be 
locked to display bearings from only 
one selected LJU. 

The LJU P built by Motorola, is ihe 
size of a chalkboard eraser. It is mount- 
ed in the vehicle in one 0l 35 inconspic- 
uous places, randomly selected. Usu- 
ally the owner has no idea where his 
UU is. No warning stickers are put on 
the vehicle. That's good, because a 
significant number of vehicles are tak* 
en at gunpoint. It would not be good if 
thieves could force owners to reveal 
the LJU's location so they could de- 
stroy it. 

Transmitters put out two watts, and 
draw only 400 rriA when transmitting. If 
the thief tries to disable the UU by 
disconnecting the vehtcte battery, an 
internal sealed lead-acid battery will 
keep it on the air, Even if that battery 
runs down, the UU will remember its 
mode (activated or not), and come up 
in that mode when the battery is recon- 
nected. 

Results Guaranteed 

So, how are Southern California 
peace officers doing at T-hunting? 
Very well, thank you Since the system 
came up on July 20. 1990, there have 
been 22 stolen vehicle activations. All 
cars were recovered within 24 hours. 
Average time was three-and-a-haff 
hours. The fastest took only 1 4 minutes 
from the time the report was filed - 

Two recoveries here resulted in 
busting large theft rings. Arrests were 
made m a quarter of the Los Angeles 
cases, which is typical for LoJack pur- 
suits. The national average for non-Lo- 
Jack car thefts is arrests in only 5 per- 
cent of the cases. 



Auto theft has gone down 9 percent 
in Massachusetts, and some insurers 
there offer lower rates to LoJack- 
equtpped vehicles. About 4.5 percent 
of all new cars sold in that state get 
equipped with L/Us 

LoJack was careful to design a sys- 
tem that is as reliable as possible, and 
stands by it with a two-year warranty. 
The company will refund the UU 'spur- 
chase price if the vehicle is not recov- 
ered within 24 hours of being reported 
stolen. 

Police like the system because it en* 
nances their safety. All too often, police 
officers have been killed or injured in 
the line of duty when they unwittingly 
pulled over a stolen car. Officers know 
that a vehicle with a squawking LoJack 
unit has been reported stolen, and can 
take appropriate precautions when ap- 
proaching it. 

Of course, the LoJack system Is not 
perfect. For one thing, the vehicle must 
be reported stolen before DFing be- 
gins. That's good because it prevents 
false alarms. But, rf the owner doesn't 
discover the theft promptly and report 
it. the vehicle could be long gone. 
That's another disadvantage — Ihe lim- 
ited range of the dragnet. Doppler 
technology limits each squad car's 
tracking range to about five miles. The 
helicopters will do better, of course. 

The company claims that short 
range isn't a problem, because of the 
large number of PTC -equipped police 
cruisers. Furthermore, thieves usually 
let stolen cars sit in a nearby safe place 
to "cool off" before driving them out Of 
the state, or out of the country. 

Perhaps, but one stolen Jeep in Los 
Angeles was recovered just two min- 
utes before the 24-hour guarantee ran 
out. Apparently it had been driven 200 
miles out of the area and back again. 

Add to this the possibility of a slow- 
up due to down time at the CLETS 
statewide computer, and you have a 
system that is not foolproof. In Massa- 
chusetts, the recovery rate has 
dropped slightly every year, from 97.9 
percent in 1987 lo 94.4 percent in 
1990 Still, that's an impressive record, 
it speaks welt for the robustness of the 
LoJack system design and the DFing 
abilities of taw enforcement officers. 

Too bad the PTCs don't tune to I wo 
meters. I could use the help of 465 
police cars on some super-tough com- 
petitive hunts. 




The LoJack dashboard unit includes a IB-LED RDF display, S-meter, and 5-character readout 
showing the ID code of the vehicle being tracked. 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 67 




Number 25 on your Feedback card 



Mike Bryce WB8VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massif (on OH 44646 

T/R Controller Relays 

The lasi few months we've done a lot 
ol building in Ihis column! This month 
we'll tie up several loose ends. The two 
projects, the T/R controller and me uni- 
versal transmitter, are both easy to 
build and get running. Very few compo- 
nents are critical. Your local Radio 
Shack store can provide most of the 
parts needed. However, herein lies the 
first problem 

The onboard relays used by the T/R 
controller have been discontinued 
from Radio Shack. However, some 
stores Still have them until the stock 
runs out. Because the PC board pat- 
tern is designed to use this particular 
relay, nothing else will fit the board, 
Unless you happen to come across the 
same relay surplus! Of course, you 
could use a junk box relay mounted off 
the board as 1 have done. Just be sure 
the coil currant is not more than the 
switching transistor can carry, Down 
the line, if there is enough interest and 
a suitable relay is found, the PC board 



Low Power Operation 



may be re-designed. 

Some readers complained that the 
sidetone will not operate There is a 
simple fix for this problem. Be sure the 
sidetone-in and sidetone-out pins are 
connected together! If they aren't, the 
tone oscillator won't work. Speaking of 
the sidetone, you don't have to build 
both the sidetone and the relay switch- 
ing if you don't need one or the other. If 
you need a sidetone generator and am- 
plifier, just build thai part of the circuit, 
To turn on the sidetone, just apply +12 
volts to the sidetonenn pin 

If you plan to operate the complete 
T/R controller with a transmitter, such 
as the universal transmitter, make sure 
you operate both the T/R controller and 
the transmitter from the same power 
supply, 

As I noted earlier, a large battery 
bank supplies all my power, AH my 
equipment is operating from this 
source. There ts no problem using the 
controller this way. However, if you op- 
erate the T/R controller from a + 1 2 volt 
supply, ANO the transmitter from a 
DIFFERENT + 12 volt supply, things 
may no! work correctly, or work at all. 
The fix is simple. Just be sure that all 




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devices are operating from the same 
+12 volt source. 

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The Universal Transmitter 

The universal transmitter contains 
some gray areas, also. The following 
hints should Help clear things up. 

The oscillator will work with Just 
about any crystal. There are no tuned 
circuits in theosciflator, VXO operation 
is possible, but I've had some really 



"Signal reports 

ranged from 529 

to 599; you CAN'T 

be QRP!" 



strange results with the crystals I've 
been using. On 30 meters , I've gotten 
about 5 kHz worth of swing. As I dis- 
cussed in an earlier column, almost all 
of the frequency shift is bunched up on 
one end of the VXO capacitor. 

My crystals came from Jan Crystals, 
They are in the HC-25/U holder and 
have a 20 pf load capacitance. I 
ordered a new set of crystals from in- 
ternational Crystal hoping to get a dif- 
ferent VXO swing. I ordered AT cut, 
fundamental crystal in the HC-6/U 
holder with a load capacitance of 30 
pF. The crystal's frequency is 10,106 
MHz, In the VXO, I used a 365 pF vari- 
able capacitor. I'm not really sure of the 
exact value o! the capacitor, since it 
came from the junk box. 

Willi the new crystal in the circuit, 
VXO swing was still only 6 kHz I tried 
to add some inductance, but did not 
see much improvement. I took the 
same crystal and Installed it m a differ- 
ent home-brew transmitter, using a dif- 
ferent oscillator scheme, OHMY- 
GOSH! Did J ever gel a surprise. With 
the crystal m the second VXO, I had a 
frequency swing of 10 kHz, from 
10 102 to 10.112.5 MHz. The VXO 
should not have moved Ihe crystal's 
frequency down, but it sure did. In the 
universal transmitter, the VXD swing is 
upward in frequency from 10.106 to 
10.1 10 MHz, Leave the 0.01 feedback 
capacitor in the circuit even if you plan 
to add a variable capacitor to warp the 
crystal's frequency. You might want to 
experiment with different values of 
feedback capacitors. Then let me know 
the results of your tests, and fit put 
them here *n this column. 

Construction ol inductors L4 and L5 
need some clarification. Make the wire 
leads coming from L4 and L5 a differ- 
ent length so that it will be easier to tell 
which is which. Coft L4 is in series be- 
tween the collector of Q3 and the 22 



ohm resistor. You can check this out 
Quite easily by making sure the collec- 
tor of Q3 has +12 volts applied to It 
when the key line is grounded. If you 
have no voltage on Q3s collector, 
you've gotten your wires crossed. 

Coil L5 is a bil easier to check. One 
end of L5 goes to the junction of 04 and 
the 47 ohm resistor. The other end of 
15 goes to ground. With an ohmmeler 
you should see zero ohms from this 
point io ground. If you see 47 ohms, 
you're reading the 47 ohms from the 
resistor to ground, and coil L5 is then 
incorrectly wired. 

30 and 40 Meters 

I was working on a version of the 
transmitter one night for 30 meters. I 
didn't have all (he correct capacitors, 
though, so I changed the output filter to 
suit what I did have. 

Use these values for 30 meters, L1 
and 12: 12 turns #22 on a T-50-2 core. 
Jumper the pads used by L3. Instead of 
the 330 pF cap. use 270 pF. Instead of 
the 630 pF, use a 560 pF capacitor. 
Omit the second 680 pF capacitor. 
Install the second 270 pF capacitor on 
the antenna side of the filter. You end 
up with two cores and three capacitors. 

For 40 meters you can use the 
following: L1 and 12: 14 turns #22 on 
T-50-2 core. Replace the first 300 pF 
with 470 pF. Jumper the pads used 
by L3, Delete the second 680 pF ca- 
pacitor. Replace the first 680 pF with 
1000 pF (0.001) and the last 300 pF 
capacitor with 470 pF. Use silver-mica 
capacitors m both filters for best 
results. 

Since I don't have crystals for 14 
MHz, I did not work out the filter values 
needed for that band. 

If Radio Shack is out of stock of the 
1 00 pH RF chokes, wind your own . Use 
ten 10 turns of 029 on FT-50-43 core, 

The final might be hard to locate. I 
still have a good supply of hamfest PAs 
lying about, and thai is what I used. If 
you can't find the part fisted, try one of 
these: RCA 4013, 2N35S3. and 
2SC2075 Also try the more readily 
available 2N3053 and 2N3S66 Just be 
careful, as the 2N3866 might become 
unstable if the leads are too long. Keep 
the leads short, to Inch from the board, 
and you should have no trouble. 

That should clear up any loose ends 
on the transmitter I've worked all up 
and down the East Coast on 30 meters 
using ihis little rig. The West Coast and 
OX are easy prey late into the night on 
30 meters, Signal reports ranged from 
529 to 599; you CANT be QRP! 1 know 
you'll find a spot for this project in your 
shack, 

Since the LLS, postal rates have just 
gone up, letters without an SASE will 
go unanswered. Sorry about that, but 
the postage realty cuts into my Diet 
Coke fund. If you don't want to commu- 
nicate via the mail try one of these Via 
CompuServe, ID* 73357 T 222. America 
Online, Michaetl087. Delphi. OR- 
PER. I forget what my ID number ot 
Prodigy is, but I'm on that service also. 
You can also reach me via packet: 
WB8VGE @ KA8Z BBS. Wheal It's 
1991 . One can'l live by CW alone! 



68 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 




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Michael J. Geier KB T UM 
% 73 Amateur Radio Today 
Forest Road 
Hancock NH 03449 

Letters, Letters. . . 

Lois of letters have been coming in* so 
perhaps now is the time to fespond to 
some of them, and to cover a few interest- 
ing topics along the way, 

Mick W6FGE asks whether there s any 
point to expensive, wide-audio bandwidth 
mikes since the radio cuts everything 
above about 2.4 kHz off anyway. Well, 
Mick, if s a good point, A mike with re* 
sponse out to 20 kHz is certainly wasted in 
amateur communications work. What 
makes some of the more costly mikes 
worth their prices is their response Within 
the transmitted bandwidth You'd be sur- 
prised how much variation there is be- 
tween different mikes. The best ones for 
S5B are dynamics or ceramics, which 
have a rising frequency curve that adds 
"punch" to the voice, and helps you to get 
heard through the inevitable QRM . But the 
shape of that curve, and the frequency at 
which it peaks, can really affect the sound. 
Converse^ the best mikes for FM tend to 
be condenser mikes, which have a fairly 
flat response. The cost of a mike is not 
directly related to its sound. In fact. I've 
heard some really cheap mikes which 
sounded great, and some expensive ones 
which were only so-so But some higher- 
priced units are distinctly crisp and great 
on the air. The obv>ous way to find out is to 
try them, A cheaper alternative is to ask 
stations you QSO with what kind of mikes 
they are using. Don'i just ask the good- 
sounding ones— find out which bad ones 
are out there, too. As for headsets, I have 
found that common "walKperson" units 
have far better fidelity than is necessary. 
They do fine for radio work, unless you 
need to shut external noise out, in which 



The Tech Answer Man 

case you need the around-the-ear kind. As 
you point out. expensive hi-fi headsets are 
a waste. 

On the subject of audio fidelity, Peter 
WtUO responds to my " Why Rigs Sound 
The Way They Do" column and relates his 
experiences with "hi-fi" SSB. He says that 
he once worked for the Voice of America, 
and they used HF SSB for their overseas 
feeds. Several fidelity-enhancing tech- 
niques were used, including diversity re- 
ception, phase-locked exalted carrier 
detection arid wideband (6 kHz} SSB fil- 
ters, each about the size ot a loaf of bread! 
(Wow— imagine the size of a '940 with fil- 
ters like that!) He says that overseas sig- 
nals sounded like Socai FM broadcasts! 
See, folks, I told you so! 

Gulllaume KftOKP asks whether AM is 
permitted on the 220 MHz band. Let me 
check my AFtRL handbook Yup. it sure 
is. Unless they've changed that since 
1963 (OK. OK, t need a new handbook), 
and I haven't heard of any such change, I 
doubt, though, that you'll find too many 
people to talk to up there on that mode, FM 
is the popular mode these days, with SSB 
and CW used for weak-signal work- But 
hey, give tt a 1ry r you never know, 

A 17-year-old ham named Sean (no 
call on the tetter) says that someone stole 
his TS-430S (shame on them!) and he 
can't afford another one. He has a digital 
shortwave receiver and wants to know if 
he can use its local oscillator to drive a 
preamp and power amp to make a simple 
transmitter. Sean, lm afraid it just isn't 
that simple. In a superheterodyne receiv- 
er, which virtually all modern sets have, 
the local oscillator does not run at the fre- 
quency you are receiving! There is a 
rather large frequency offset, and that off- 
set depends upon the first IF frequency. 
For instance, if the first \F is at 10.7 MHz, 
the local oscillator will be either 10 7 MHz 
higher or lower (depending upon the re- 



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ceiver design) than the frequency to which 
you are tuned, The only ways I can think of 
lo get the frequency you want would be to 
design a mixer and inject another local 
signal to shift the frequency, or to repro- 
g ram the frequency on transmit so thai i Ms 
m the right place. Either would be a great 
deal more trouble than il is worth. And 
there are other problems, such as stabili- 
ty, purity and signal level. All in all, con- 
sumer short waves just don't have what it 
takes to make decent ham rigs. A far bet- 
ter alternative would be to buy a cheap 
older transceiver at a harnfest and use 
your time and ingenuity to fix it up. In the 
end. you will be much happier with the 
results. And, you won't risk ruining your 
shortwave in the process, 

Kenneth KA9RUA describes his frus- 
tration at trying to get schematics and ser- 
vice daia for telephone gear such as cord* 
Jess phones and answering machines. He 
asks whether it is fegal for Ihe manufactur- 
ers to withhold such information. Well, as 
far as I know, there is no law requiring 
them to give their data out . And i , too, have 
run into this brick wall regarding a broken 
answering machine, I suppose there could 
be some law pr oh ibiti ng the general public 
from tampering with equipment connect- 
ed to the phone lines, but I don't think so. I 
know of at least one majot manufacturer 
that sells service manuals for their lele- 
pho n e gear , So perha ps t h e others are just 
being pigheaded and greedy, hoping 
yo u i I b u y anot her un i t or send yours in for 
an expensive repair job, I agree, it stinks. 
Let's be glad the ham manufacturers have 
more sense than that! 

Dean KF7CR asks several questions, 
including some already covered in previ- 
ous columns. But let me give them a whirl 
Dean, PLL works by generating a stable 
digital pulse at a required frequency and 
then voHage-controlhng an analog sine- 
wave oscillator until it matches the digital 
reference. The result is a programmable, 
crystal-accurate local oscillator. Because 
It's a two-way process (controlling the os- 
cillator and then comparing its output fre- 
quency), tt is by definition a loop. Hence 
the name, "phase-locked loop/* And yes, 
your pockei digital shortwave works that 
way. For a more detailed explanation, 
pjease see my column in the March 1990 
issue of 73, 

Packet radio is, as you guessed, a form 
of BBS over the air. 1 1 is also many other 
ihings, including a nifty auto-forwarding 
system which lets you place a message on 
your locaf BBS and have It delivered In a 
day or two at a very distant BBS, with no 
transmission errors It is called "packet' 
because the data is transmitted in groups 
of characters, or packets, wiih each pack- 
et automatically including the originating 
ca llsign (yours), the destination BBS and 
callsign, and error-deled rng codes. Dur- 
ing packet reception, any delected errors 
cause the packet to be resent until it is 
received intact. Tnere's lots more to it, but 
that's the basic idea. Packet Is very useful 
and fun, especially if you have ham friends 
in other states or countries, because you 
can keep in touch without having to be on 
the air at the same lime they are! Get a 
TftC and try it out! If you already have a 2 
meter rig, even a watkie. it is fairly inex- 
pensive and definitely worth it. 

As for your noise suppress ion prob- 



lems, I think some of them may be very 
difficult. Dimmers and fluorescent lights 
generate fast-rising pulses which are just 
plain stubborn. You are probably best off 
replacing them with regular switches and 
incandescent bulbs As tor your VW Rab- 
bit ignition noise, wow— that is the worst 
I've ever heard of Since the car eats igni* 
tion cables In 5,000 miles, I suspect you 
have a real problem Perhaps the ignition 
resistor relay is stuck. That would allow full 
starting current to flow even alter the en- 
gine is running, \ had a car with this prob- 
lem once, and it ate points as fast as yours 
eats wires. Your high voltage must be way 
too high, 

Also on the subject Of interference -prob- 
lems. Winston KB6DHB asks for help be* 
cause his ng gets mlo his TV and stereo 
speakers, and even a low-pass filter 
hasn't helped, From what you describe, 
Winston, it sounds like plain old overload. 
Too much RF is ge fling into the TV and 
stereo. A low- pass filter only helps if Ihe 
problem is harmonic output from the 
transmitter, and does no good at all for 
simple overload Check to see if the TV 
gets interference en all channels from 2 to 
6. That's a good clue If it '$ onty channel 2. 
it couk) be harmonics Even with the low- 
pass filter, some small amount of harmon- 
ic energy could be escaping. Also, your 
G5RV antenna is inherently unbalanced, 
because one leg is longer than the other. 
Try a balun at the antenna, or go lo a stan- 
dard dipoEe, Perhaps that will help keep 
RF from crawling back up the coax shield. 
You could also try a line filter, but try dis- 
connecting the TV antenna or cable feed 
first. If the problem goes away, the inter- 
ference ts getting in from the antenna in- 
put, and a line filter will do no good , 

Finally, a prospective ham named 
Robert asks how we get meters from 
hertz, as in the 20 meter band being on 1 4 
MH2, etc. Well, first let me state that Ihe 
meter band designations are only approxi- 
mate, and can never be exact because 
they are d esc r i bi n g more t han one spec i fie 
frequency. Bui it works like this: For any 
given frequency, a wave wiEl hsv^ traveled 
a definable distance before its next peak 
occurs. Thus, the resulting wavelength 
wilt get shorter as the frequency goes up, 
because the wave doesn't have as much 
time to travel before the next one comes 
along. The wavelength can be calculated 
and expressed in meters, feel, or anything 
you like, A simple conversion from time 
units (MHz) to distance (meters) will do the 
trick. The formula is: wavelength in meters 
= 30O/frequency in MHz. The 300 is called 
a 'conversion factor,'* and is required to 
relate seconds and meters. As for your 
other questions regarding the best choice 
of equipment and proper operating proce- 
dure, go visit your local ham club and you 
will get more advice than you probably 
want! (We hams love to talk about that 
stuff.) Also, there are some good books 
available from the ARRL and other organi- 
zations. And, of course, don't miss the 
great product reviews in 73\ 

Well, folks, that's about it for this month. 
Keep them cards and letters coming. 
But please, save your stamps and return 
envelopes, it is very rare that I can send 
individual replies— there's just too much 
to do. Thanks for your understand- 
ing. 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



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CIRCLE 62 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



^Amateur 
Radio Today 



I 



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R.S*# 



page 



109 A& A Engineering . . . . ., 


, . . . 


.. 59 


164 Ac© Communications of 




Indianapolis 


. 77 


» Advanced Electronic 




Applications .. 13,33.37 


253 Alabama Amateur Electronics 


.. 51 


67 Atmco Electronics 


38 


291 All Band Radio 


.. 67 


1 94 All Electronics Corporation . . . 


.. 18 


* Amateur Electronics Supply 


.. 43 


4 Amid on Associates . 


. . 71 


90 Antennas West, 


> 75 


5 Antennas West ... 


.. B3 


107 Antennas West 


17 


S3 Antennas West 


69 


296 Antennas West 


29 


236 Antennas West ..... 





60 


135 Antennas West 




65 


16 Astron Corporation 


m W m m 


.- 19 


27 Avcom of Virginia 


m. .m. m ■ 


. . 69 


243 AXM.IhC. .„ 




67.71 


289 Aztech, Inc 


■ - - 


49 


21 B&Bjnc, 




... 17 


S3 Barker & Williamson 


.- 79 


4 1 Bar ry E tec iron i c s Corporation . 


.. 21 


42 Bilaf Company 


60 


176 Bird Electronics 


. 53 


197 Brainstorm Engineering 


. 55 


84 Broadcast Technical Service - 


67 


56 Buck master Publishing 


60* 


170 Buckmaster Publisntng 


. 63* 


7 BucKmasier Publishing 


. 17' 


168 BuCkmaster Publishing 


, 77' 


• Burg hard i Amateur Radio 


. 29 


184 C&SSaies.lne 


17 


116 CATS 


60 


277 Cable Network 


1 -I I- ■ i 


i . . 65 



R.S.tf page 

251 Cable X-perts , 65 

• CB City International , . 75 

• Cellular Security Group 51 

265 Chipswitch 4 , . .. M 

• Cleveland institute of Electronics 

63 

156 Commpute CofpOftk>n .67 

99 Communication Concepts, Inc.. . 57 

10 Communication Specialist 35* 

121 Communications Electronics ...23 
146 Creative Control Products 83 

• Dallas Ham Com 51 

287 Davis Associates , ,...,.. 29 

256 Delia Research 57 

257 Detta Research . . , . . . 51 

• Down East Microwave ... ... 71 

114 E,H. Yost - 61 

T33 Electronic Center Inc. .57 

• Electronic Distributors ,41 

185 Electronic Engineenng . ... # . 65 

8 Elktronics .... . ..... 59 

• Engineering Consulting 63 

280 Excellent Technology , . . 18 

80 Garde! Electronics 29 

193 GGTE , . . . . 83* 

282 Giehl Electronics ...... ... 45 

17 GLB Electronics 81 

72 Glen Martin Engineenng . , 53 
192 Grapevine Group 83 

• Ham Radio Toy Store 85 

57 Hamtronics. Inc 31 

59 Heil Sound 67 

1 79 ICOM America . . . . CV2 

281 Inner Vision , . . , , 29 

77 Interflex Systems - 61 

270 J-Com , 51 ,57 

• Japan Radio ,.> , 25 



R.SJf page 

260 JoGunn Enterprises , 49 

285 JPS Communications 24 

• K-Comm . 65 

• Kenwood USA Corporation 

234 Lentini Communications 69 

47 Link-Com 65 

25 Madison Electronic Supply . 81 

101 Maxcomjnc , W 

55 Meadowlake Corporation 83 

241 Media Mentors 77 

44 Metro Printing 83 

86 MFJ Enterprises 1 

114 Mr Nicad .,.♦.61 

162 Michigan Radio 16 

160 Micro Computet Concepts 70 

144 Micro Control Specialities .16 

231 Mirage/KLM .......... 75 

286 Nam tutu Communications 61 

54 NCG 57,59 

78 North Olmsted Amateur Radio . . 75 
■ P.C. Electronics 55,68' 

178 Pacific Cable Company, Inc 75 

199 Palomar Telecom 45 

264 Palomar Telecom 45 

288 Performance Electronics , 61 

68 Periphex . 75 

249 Phillips-Tech 69 

T4S QSO Software ...... . . 81 

132 Quement Electronics 16J9 

31 Radio Amateur CaJIbook 61 

76 Radio Engineers + ....... 83 

34 Ramsey Electronics 27* 

275 Raymond Buchheit & 

Associates 18 

254 Ross Distributing 69 



R.S.0 



page 



e I i t 



*■ * W f * 



■ ■ * i -f n n 



****•■* 



71 Rutland Arrays 11 + 
153 Satellite City 

95 Sensible Solutions 
188SGCinc -,.-.„. 

244 Software Systems 

2504Sottware Systems ... . . 

$1 Spectrum Communications . . 
183 Spectrum International 
247 Startek 

87 TCE Labs *...»» 

232 TE Systems 

124 Texas Bug Catcher Antenna 

• The Ham Center 
1 3 1 The Ham Station , . 

1 1 7 The Pouch 

150 The Radio Works.. 
115 The BF Connection 

62 TNR 

• Universal Radio 

120 Van Gof den Engineering 
104 Van Iderstine & Sons, Inc. 

79 Vanguard Labs 

269 Versatel Communications 

• VHF Communications .. 

261 Visual Concepts 

191 W&W Associates ...... 

38 W9INN Antennas.... 
292 Walker Scientific, Inc 

63 Wl-Comm Electronics ........ 

20 Wolfe Communications - 

» Yaesu Electronics Corporation 



i *■ i m 



.... 



66 

. 47* 

.. 7t 
., 85 

.. 85 

49 
,. 85 
15 
83 
41 
67 
65 
77 
69 
53 
61 
71 



*■ - i • 



m I 4 + 



1*4-1 



. • - . . . . 



65 

60 
59 
17 
.., 59 
.. 63 
.. 53 
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72 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



Never Say Die 

Continued from page 4 
palace. I've sat in Geneva represent- 
ing the U.S. at a world conference. I ' ve 
addressed the FCC commissioners in 
hearings. I've helped a youngster in 
Burma find a wife in Singapore and 
settle in the US. I've visited Father 
Moran in Nepal. I've helped a ham I 
met in Yugoslavia move to the U.S. 
Ditto a French ham No, I'm not brag* 
ging, I'm telling you whet you can do. 
I'm telhng you what the youngsters you 
mentor can do. 

You're a ham? Through amateur ra- 
dio you can learn about FM. sideband, 
spread spectrum, computers, digital 
audto, digital communications, televi- 
sion, slow-scan, HTTY, satellite com- 
munications, antennas, feedtines, 
gates, memory chips, synthesizers, 
telephone switches, facsimile, radar, 
LQRAN. underwater sound, moon- 
bounce, meteor scatter, aurora com- 
munications, and what people are like 
in around 400 countries. 

Whenever I see a picture of the big 
dish a! Arecibo I remember climbing up 
into it with Sam W1FZJ And I remem- 
ber being pan of the team that used 
this 1 ,000-foot dish to make 1200 MHz 
ham contacts all over the world. 

The real key to what we are going to 
do when we grow up lies in learning. If 
we use our time well, we'll be ready for 
whatever opportunities the world pre- 
sents. Like Alfie, the world presents 
opportunities and they are lost due to 
our blindness to them, f'd already been 
exposed to technology through my 
grandfather, who was an inventor, so I 
was able to confidently tackle learning 
about radio. 

Are you daunted by packet? By 
satellite communications? Perhaps, 
no matter your age, it's time to be ad- 
venturous and become an expert in a 
new aspect of the hobby. We need pio- 
neers, even if they need walkers to get 
around Even if you re BO, you stilt have 
a lot of growing to do. It's nol too late to 
plan what you're going to do when you 
grow up. 

And once you have some perspec- 
tive on life, maybe you can share what 
you've teamed with some youngsters. 
Teenagers need mentors Their par- 
ents seldom have enough dispassion- 
ate perspective to help. So that leaves 
you . And if you do mentor some young- 
sters, are you going to be passing 
along your beliefs and prejudices, or 
can you give them some straight dope 
which will really help them cope with 
their lives? 

You remember what teachers were 
like, so you know how little help Ihey 
can be. You may even remember 
about parents. And you're seeing the 
values today's television provides. 
Some guidance! If you believe TV, alt 
teenies are nerds and geeks. Great 
role models. 

In addition to giving talks on en- 
trepreneur ing at colleges I also enjoy 
taJking with 5lh graders and helping 
them see some hints as to the possibili- 
ties they've got. And I'm mentoring 
some college students, too. I only wish 
there was a medium where it would be 



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possible to reach kids with some unbi- 
ased information on how the world 
works and how they can not just cope 
with it. but also help improve it during 
their tenure, 

As for me, I've never had any illu- 
sions about my growing up. It's never 
been a goal. Now I find that's par for 
creative people, so I guess ( don't feel 
as defensive as I did when I was a kid 
about making the world conform to me 
instead of my conforming to il. World, 
shape up. and get a move on, J haven't 
got all day! 

Are you doing your homework? Are 
you reading magazines and books, 
talking with people, building things? 
Where were you in 1975 when micro- 
computers came along? Where were 
you when ! was preaching computers? 
t was 53 then. Did I face this whole new 
technology and give up? No way! With- 
in a year I was giving fectures on com* 
puters to computer professionals. 
Sure, I did a lot of homework. I still 
meet people who took my advice at the 
time and got into computers. Some be- 
came fabulously rich. Some didn't. But 
everyone enjoyed what they were do- 

iog. 
We have similar opportunities today 

with direct satellite broadcasting, high 
definition TV, digital audio, digital TV, 
digital signal processing, personal 
telephones, data compacting. . .It's 
an endless and exciting world ahead in 
technology. And amateur radio is the 
key to this world for youngsters. 

Are you teaming and teaching? Are 
you mentoring? Or are you grousing 
about no-code, how bad things are on 
our bands, and being in general a use- 
less negative curmudgeon? Sure, I see 
the problems, out I love problems be- 
cause they call lor creative solutions. 
The fact that you are allowing a few 
idiots to screw up 14.313 every day and 
do nothing more than wring your hands 
about it is pathetic 

Sure, it takes confidence to see a 
need and actually do something about 
it That's what got me into publishing in 
the first place. I didn't know anything 
about it, but 1 knew I'd learn. And. as I 
mentioned recently^ I'm still learning. I 
still go to publishing conferences and 



attend seminars. Much of the time I 
should be teaching 'em, but I know I've 
plenty more to learn. 

That's what keeps me reading piles 
of magazines and a couple books a 
week, year after year One whole end 
of my home is sagging under the 
weight of my library 

I love to learn about music, too, so 
somehow I manage to listen to a half 
dozen or so CDs a day, The music in- 
dustry is fascinating and I'm having a 
ball with it. There are tremendous busi- 
ness opportunities in this field, too Mu- 
sic and technology have merged, 
which is great for me. 

And if radio and audio don't get you 
excited, how about becoming an elec- 
tromagnetic expert and helping find 
oul more about how EM fields effect 
living cells? You can gel a download of 
references on the 73 BBS and see 
what I've read so far. 

Are you ready to give a talk on the 
magtev? On NMR? Are you game to 
help some school classes learn about 
electronics and communications, if I 
can get our schools to set up these 
courses? Or are you spending your de- 
clining years pontificating on 75m? Or 
adding to the pife-ups on 20m? 

Ooops. my soapbox is beginning to 
come apart. 

When I Grow Up. . .Part II 

Amateur radio may be a great key to 
learning about technology, but how 
many of us leave the key in the drawer 
and don't use «t ? Id like not only to get 
you to take that key out and start open- 
ing doors for yourself, but to give 
copies to youngsters so they can open 
doors and open up their lives. I know 
what an impact it's had on my life — 
how about you? Any chance of your 
writing to me about it? 

The opening doors are entries to 
learning possibilities. How can we 
learn? How do we educate ourselves to 
take advantage of amateur radio's po- 
tentials? 

In retrospect. I think I learned less 
during my years in college than 1 have 
in almost any year since then. My col- 
lege wasn't set up to really teach. Jt 
was geared to students memorizing 



data in order to pass tests. I found it 
profoundly frustrating. This was why 
I've gone back to my college to try and 
help them become more productive 
and relevant. That's a whole story in 
itself, but I'm making progress — and 
so is my college, 

I was out of college two years before I 
discovered self Teaching through read- 
ing. Since then I've built quite a library. 
I've probably averaged a book or two a 
week for the last 40 years, plus at least 
25 magazines a week. 

It's exciting to learn. Suddenly 
grasping a new concept brings a rush 
, , a thrill. For instance, my recent ad- 
ventures in digital audio have been fan- 
tastic — it's a whole new technology. 
Do you understand 1 ^bil technology? 
Why not? if you have the time to watch 
a basketball game, you have the time it 
lakes to understand 1-bit technology. 
The ball game is soon over and forgot- 
ten. The understanding of a new con- 
cept will be with you for life. And yes, of 
course it can be important to amateur 
radio. 

If we're able to keep some of our 
ham bands through the next couple 
WARCs. we're going to eventually go 
digital, complete with data compacting 
systems we haven't even thought of 
yet. Have you read much about data 
compacting technology yet? How 
about fractal math and chaos theory 
and their applications to communica- 
tions? 

For instance, you CW fans who are 
used to bleeping away at each other at 
a snail's pace, has it ever occurred to 
you to strive for more throughput? One 
creative approach might be to take the 
1Q" code concept to the next level of 
abstraction, A study of amateur com- 
munications will. I suspect, show thai 
it'd be simple to develop a ham orient- 
ed "Pidgin English.*' We could encode 
the few dozen basic communications 
concepts we have settled into using 
into a simple code Instead of sending 
"QSL?" we could substitute one S-brt 
character for the four we've been us- 
ing. Eight bits gives us 256 different 
combinations, so with just one charac- 
ter we could convey 256 different 
ideas. That's more than we use in a 
week of average ham contacts and rt 
increases our throughput four times. 
This, in turn P will allow us to use only 
25% as much bandwith, allowing four 
limes as many QSOs in a band. 

If you feel that's too limited then, 
heck, let's blow it right out to 16 bits 
and have 65.536 concepts. That's 
more concepts than I've heard dis- 
cussed over the air in 20 years. But it 
would be a simple way to cover a wide 
range of ideas in a hurry and get be- 
yond the please QSL" contact limita- 
tions. 

Several readers have written, asking 
how they can uncover mutual interests 
during contacts. Using our present 
system it ain't easy. How would I be 
able to find out if the chap I'm talking 
with is into skin diving? Photography? 
Cooking? Miatas? Gaia? Cosmology' 
UFOs? Macintoshes? South African 
folk music? Roller coasters? Or that 
he T s been to Bali. Cairns, Xian. or Kota 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May T 1991 73 



^■^ 



Kinabalu? A bil of encoding could com- 
press each of thousands of interests 
into one single 16-bit datum. 

Upon making contact, the other 
chap could send his name and loca- 
tion, followed by a string of interest 
codes, It doesn't take much computer 
power to tell me which fits in with my 
interests And off we go. 

Of course if you really insist on mak- 
ing this compatible with smoke signal 
technology, we could slick to our type- 
writer characters and send them via 
Morse's code. With 26 letters and 10 
numbers we have 36 characters at 
hand. Three characters would give us 
46,656 combinations. Will that hold 
you? We could even call it a "O-code" 
if we initiated the code groups with a 
" QQQ" starting sequence. I doubt that 
we'll be wasting spectrum space with 
Morse code tor much longer— unless 
of course we keep our present bands 
and we are unable to generate any 
more growth than we have in the last 25 
years. In which case we can continue 
happily with our antique communica- 
tions modes for years 

Many years ago I suggested we build 
a 65.000-word dictionary and assign a 
number to each word. Then all we'd 
have to do is send a string of numbers 
and our computers would translate 
them into words again for us. This 
would increase our throughput by 
three times and allow us to narrow our 
bandwidths by that. 

A couple of added advantages would 
be that this would, (or the first time, 
allow foreign amateurs to talk with us 
via computer -translated messages. Al- 
so, if we want security all we have to do 
is scramble those 16 bits around in a 
predetermined way. At a 9.600 baud 
rate we could have a throughput of 
around 25,000 words per minute. A 
400-word message would zip through 
in one second. 

Let's say that I've piqued your imagi* 
nation and you've decided that you are 
willing to take the initiative and team 
about some new phase of amateur ra- 
dio. How are you going to go about It? 
Well, jf you have a solid set of 73 and 
QST back issues, you've got a good 
start. Then you'll want to look for spe- 
cialized ham newsletters to take you to 
the next phase. 

That's what gol me mto this whole 
publishing mess in the first place. I was 
enjoying RTTY pioneering and gol fed 
up with the lack of information, so I 
started a newsletter in 1951 . It's obvi- 
ously gotten way out of hand. 

Alas, only a few of the hams involved 
with developing new technologies 
have enough interest in helping others 
to bother writing, so information is not 
easy to find. In the early days of re- 
peaters there were some marvelously 
welt-developed repeater networks 
such as the Gronk Network, which pro- 
vided instant communications from 
San Diego to San Francisco and all the 
way out to Phoenix. I pled with them to 
encourage other similar nets to be de- 
veloped around the country by writing- 
Too much trouble. I tried everything I 
could to get them to write. Part of the 
problem was laziness, part a smug pro- 



tection of what those involved had 
learned. An unwillingness to share with 
others. 

If you'd like to help, there are some 
easy ways to do it. For instance, there 
are tons of electronics and communi- 
cations books in print. Unfortunately, 
many are poorly written and are not 
nearly as helpful as they might be, So, 
when you find a book you think will help 
others learn about some aspect of 
electronics or communications, how 
about taking a few minutes to review it? 
If you can let me know what you've 
found, I can pass this along and every- 
one will benefit — and we may even add 
it to Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf. 

By focusing attention on the better 
books, we'll help discourage publish- 
ers from flooding us with drek. And by 
helping the better authors to be re- 
warded we'll end up with more good 
books. Make sense? 

One of the reasons I knew Byte was 
needed was that when I read the avail- 
able computer books I discovered they 
were almost impossible to understand. 
Instead of putting this down to me be- 
ing dumb. I decided it wasn't me and 
that the microcomputer, which had just 
been invented, would bring about an 
enormous demand for easy-to-under- 
stand information. So i started maga- 
zines to fill this need. Wow, was I right 
on that one! 

I read a book or two a week, A few of 
them I would love to recommend. If 
you're interested 111 try to keep you 
abreast of my reading. This would be 
better via our Z3BBS than in the maga- 
zine since only a small percentage of 
my reading is ham oriented and ! sus- 
pect that most 73 readers are interest- 
ed only in amateur radio oriented 
books and could easily turn nasty if ( 
suggest reading anything beyond this 
narrow field. 

But let's )ust suppose that you are 
20. 40 or even 60 and reading this. At 
20 you're just getting started in life. 
You're probably about to graduate 
from college a her 1 6 years of third-rate 
education . You are undoubtedly one of 
the more fortunate graduates in that 
you are able to read and you have an 
interest (hamming) which you can par- 
iay into a career. Of course you're go- 
ing to have to make a big decision 
You're going to have to say, "Enough 
with all this school nonsense, I've got 
to start really learning/' 

Of course if you gel sucked into 
wasting your life on non -career side- 
tracks such as politics, religion, and 
righting an almost infinite number of 
the world's wrongs; or you let peer 
pressure get you involved with drugs 
such as alcohol, cigarettes, and worse; 
or you get involved with watching 
sports events, others are going to 
quickly pass you by and you're going to 
have to be satisfied with being jealous 
of those with successful careers and 
angry at yourself for screwing up. 

At 20 you can pick any branch of 
electronics and within a year become 
an expert. Or you can coast through life 
waiting for a lucky break or a state 
megabucks win. But since you're not 
going to be tuned into passing opportu- 



nities, you* re going to miss most of 
p em. 

At 40 you're having to face up to how 
dumb you were at 20 not to invest your 
time more productively. This is when 
men make mid-life changes. It's your 
last big chance to get on a personal 
career path which leads somewhere, 
It's your last chance to shape up and 
get the education you were too busy to 
bother getting at 20. Well, I'm sure 
those hundreds of ball games you've 
watched will comfort you in your old 
age. . .which is now looming immedi- 
ately ahead of you. Forty is middle age. 
After 40 it gets increasingly difficult to 
find work. And It's difficult to down-size 
your lifestyle if the axe falls and middle 
management at your company is sud- 
denly cleaned out. 

At 60 you're very unlikely to ever get 
another job. You're on your own now. 
Nave you stored up enough money to 
coast the rest of the way, golf dubs In 
hand? Have you enough on the ball to 
make a living as a consultant? 

At 60 you've got a good chance at 20 
more years (unless you smoke), so 
there's still time to start from scratch 
and become an electronics expert in 
some field. I started over when t was 
61. Well, yes. I had a little money put 
aside to scratch with. At 61 I picked an 
entirely new field and began to build a 
new publishing career in the digital au- 
dio and music fields. 

In my early years I didn't really plan . I 
took what came, moving from radio to 
TV broadcasting, then to speaker man- 
ufacturing, with side trips into psychol- 
ogy and music. I think my first major 
career decision was when I was 38 and 
started 73 I knew that was a long-term 
decision. 

My second decision was, as I said, at 
61 . Both turned out to be good deci- 
sions. Today I have plans going out for 
the next 20 to 30 years— probably far 
beyond my life expectancy I'm glad I 
learned to learn when I was 28 — and 
regret the years I wasted before that. 

It's no news flash that education is 
the key to success in any way you want 
to measure it- I'm not talking schools, 
because you can educate yourself far 
better and faster than any school I've 
seen or heard of. And you can have 
more fun doing this than welching foot- 
ball or hanging out at the mall. And 
that's at any age from around 10 until 
you finally get that coveted Sitent Key 
award plaque. 

If you haven't gotten into packet yet, 
that's both an easy and fun way to start 
expanding your technological hori- 
zons. Keep noies of your progress and 
let me know how it goes. 

License Growth 

The FCC numbers are in for 1990, 
and if you don't mind ignoring that the 
FCC doesn't take into consideration 
dropouts and silent keys any more 
(since 1984). we've had some growth. 
If you factor in lost souls and the Grim 
Reaper, it doesn't look all that wonder- 
ful, 

If we don't count our losses and we 
compare the 1990 count against 1987, 
we find that in four years the number of 



Generals has grown a mighty 4.7%. 
Yep, in four years and not counting 
losses! ifs no better for Advanced* 
which on paper has grown by 4.2%. 
Wow! 

Well, how about Novices? No great 
n u m ber of deat h$ t here , thou g h we can 
expect heavy dropouts. On paper, in 
four years our Novice ranks have in- 

creased by 13.1%. 

Correcting the presently completely 
spurious FCC numbers depends on 
how fast we're dying off. If the average 
ham age today is around 55, then on 
the average we've got maybe 25 years 
left before we get our coveted Silent 
Key award from the League. Let's see, 
25 into the FCC total of 500,000 would 
give us a departing rate of around 
20.000 a year. No wonder those lists in 
QST are so long these days! If that's 
true, and not even counting dropouts, 
we've barely broken even m the last 
four years. 

Settling the Arab-Palestinian 
Problem 

Oh T good Lord! Now Wayne's going 
to try and settle the unsaleable. Obvi- 
ously there is no simple solution to the 
Arab-Israeli mess. Or to the problems 
in Beirut, Libya. Iraq and so on. Per- 
haps it isn't as difficult to come up with 
a long-lasting peaceful solution as ev- 
eryone seems to think. 

So whais this got to do with amateur 
radio? It actually does have a good 
deal to do with it. though I wouldn't let 
that stop me from writing about it. even 
if it didn't. 

When I first visited Jordan in 1970, 
I'd already been writing about the criti- 
cal importance of technology (o the 
progress of a country in my 73 editori- 
als for several years. Amateur radio, I 
felt, was one ol the simplest ways of 
Introducing technology to the public. 
Through a hobby such as amateur ra- 
dio, where learning technology is 
made fun T I believed that youngsters 
could be encouraged to become tech- 
nicians, engineers and scientists ., One 
of the main goals of my 24-country, 
a round-the-world DXpedition trip in 
1 966 was to see if I could get the ITU to 
embrace amateur radio as a means for 
developing an Interest by youngsters 
in technology in third world countries. 

My first step was lo visit the recent 
ITU ex -Secretary-General in Addis 
Ababa and ask his advice on how to get 
the ITU to encourage the growth of am- 
ateur radio in third world countries. He 
loved the idea and said he would make 
arrangements for me to meet the new 
Secretary-General on my visit to New 
Delhi. 

He was as good as his word, SO when 
I got to New Delhi I had no trouble in 
meeting with the new ITU Secretary- 
General. He too liked my plan for get* 
ting amateur radio going in third world 
countries as a way to introduce young- 
sters to the hobby. . .and to iechnota- 
gy as a result, t promised to provide a 
set of amateur radio rules and regula- 
tions for the ITU to recommend, 

I had a wonderful time DXing from 
Beirut, Damascus, Tehran, Kabul, 
New Delhi, Katmandu, Singapore, 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1091 75 



Noumea, Suva, Apia. Pago Pago, Pa- 
peete and on around the world. When I 
got back I got to work on writing ham 
rules for third world countries. About 
this time the Secretary-General had a 
heart attack and died. 

With amateur radio in the middle of 
the 'Incentive Licensing' 1 disaster, I 
was unable to leave my magazine and 
meet the new ITU Secretary-General, 
How bad was the hobby hit? 85% of the 
ham dealers had just gone out of busi- 
ness. 90% of the manufacturers had, 
loo. My business manager stole all the 
money he could while I was on my trip 
and tried to put the magazine out of 
business so he could start his own 
magazine. It was a difficult time for me. 

By 1970 1 was finally ab*e to get away 
from the magazine for a couple weeks, 
so when I heard thai King Hussein was 
interested m amateur radio I saw an 
opportunity to give my third world coun- 
try concept a try. I sent him a cabte 
offering to help him with his new ham 
station. He said sure, come on over. 

I spent two weeks operating JV1 
from the royal palace and talking with 
His Majesty. I explained Ihe benefits of 
amateur radio to Jordan. I pointed out 
that if he set up ham stations in his 
schools and encouraged Jordanian 
youngsters to learn about amateur ra- 
dio, that in short order he'd have a 
bunch of enthusiastic electronic ex- 
perts, technicians and scientists. 

He gathered his government around 
a large table so I could explain the idea 
to them I pointed out that if Jordan was 
going to fit into the modern world, it had 
to have technicians and engineers, 
and the best way to get them was to 
interest youngsters m a technical hob- 
by such as amateur radio so they'd 
learn under their own steam, 

When I got back home I updated my 
ITU amateur radio rules and regula- 
tions proposal, printed a tew hundred 
copies on my offset press, and sent 
them to His Majesty, They used them 
pretty much as I proposed them. 

Soon after I left Jordan a civil war 
broke out between the PLO and the 
Jordanians. Even though the country 
was in the middle of a civil war the 
school club stations were established 
and radio clubs formed. 

In 1973. when I'd just finished a 
slow-scan QSO with a chap in Athens, 
a voice broke in on frequency, 
"W2NSD. this is Juliet Yankee One/* II 
was His Majesty and he wanted to 
meet me in Washington in a tew days. I 
met him ai Blair House and was hand- 
ed round-trip tickets to Amman . ' 'I want 
you to see what you ve done tor us, P1 be 
said. 

When I arrived in Amman I was mei 
by Hisham Ansari JY4HA, who pro- 
ceeded to drive me from one end of 
Jordan to the other, introducing me to 
over 500 newly licensed Jordanian 
youngsters , They had set up one or two 
radio club stations in every city in Jor- 
dan. 

Hisham had been appointed by the 
king to travel around Ihe country to 
help the youngsters learn radio and 
electronic theory. His enthusiasm and 
teaching style had helped make learn- 



ing fun for the youngsters. 

They threw lavish parties for me and 
I got to meet all the top people in the 
government. I was a hero, at least for a 
few minutes, That was nice, but the 
reel kick was that my idea had been 
proven. Now what could I do to get 
other countries to accept the idea? 

Little did I know that two of the worst 
traumas of my life lay immediately 
ahead, I've shared those at length in 
my old editorials, so I'll save their 
retelling for my memoirs. By 1 975 1 was 
deep into computers, so it wasn't until 
1933 that I had another opportunity to 
visit Jordan. 

During that short visit. Prince Raad 
JY2RZ organized a special meeting of 
the Royal Jordanian Amateur Radio 
Society and introduced me as having 
had more of an influence on Jordan 
than anyone other than the king hinv 
sett 

Okay, now let's dig into history so I 
can put the next step into perspective. 
Those of you who have any familiarity 
with history know that the Arabs were 
the world leaders a thousand years ago 
in philosophy, medicine, astronomy 
and technology. 



voys at night on the surface I knew 
where every ship in the convoy was 
and every move (hey made, white they 
didn't have a clue we were there until 
our torpedoes started exploding all 
over the place. 

After the war the Japanese figured 
out how critically important technology 
was and they went after It with a 
vengeance. Today they're tar ahead of 
us {and the rest of the world) in many 
high-tech fields. Technology has made 
Japan #1 in the world in finance. It's 
enabled them to beat us (and Europe) 
in one industry after another 

Look at the difference technology 
has made in warfare. Iraq was outfitted 
with the latest in technology from 
France, Germany and the USSR, yet 
our weapons quickly knocked 'em for a 
loop We were one generation ahead in 
technology and that made all the differ- 
ence. 

What Next, Then? 

The solution to the Arab-Israeli prob- 
lem, to the fighting in Beirut and to 
Syria's belligerence and all the other 
Arab infighting, lies m education. With 
education the Arabs will be able lo 



"TTie solution to the Arab-Israeli 

problem, to the fighting in Beirut 

and to Syria's belligerence and 

ail the other Arab infighting, 

lies in education. ff 



Hie Arabs know this and it ts galling 
forthem to have been left behind by the 
industrial revolution and then, as a re* 
suit, be exploited by the Europeans. It 
was technology that enabled the Jews 
to found Israel in 1948. They'd set up 
amateur radio stations all through Pal- 
estine while it was under British con- 
trol. Then, when the British pulled out, 
these ham stations instantly became a 
milstary communications system that 
enabled the Jews to quickly rout the 
Palestinians. Indeed, amateur radio 
has been given a great deal of credit for 
the founding of the Jewish slate. 

The key to solving Ihe Palestinian 
problem doesn't lie in distributing terri- 
tory. That isn t going to solve the basic 
enmities which will continually erupt in 
confrontations That isn't going to ease 
Ihe frustrations that have built up for 
the last 43 years and that were exacer- 
bated by the 1 967 six-day war and the 
1973 war with Egypt. 

How About Japan? 

Japan tried using their army and 
navy to gain power. We beat them with 
technology Yes, we fought hard, but rt 
was technology that won that war, not 
just fighting. I was right there up front In 
a submarine sinking Japanese ships 
(we sank 27 of 'em} t so I know what an 
enormous difference technology 
made. 

We were able to go unobserved right 
through the middle of Japanese con- 



come up to speed in technology and 
regain their racial pride, 

One of the dumbest moves the 
blacks made in South Africa was that 
when they got mad at the whites, they 
pulled their children out of school. 
They stopped their education. Talk 
about shooting themselves in the foot! 
That just made a lousy situation all the 
worse, leaving an educational vacuum 
which could take generations to repair. 

Now, back to Jordan. My suggestion 
is to stan with educational program- 
ming on the Jordanian TV stations. 
These programs should be made so 
interesting that people will watch them 
because they're entertaining, not be- 
cause they're educational . 

In addition to everything normally 
taught sn grammar school. Id also in- 
elude a course m the fundamentals of 
electronics, computers and communi- 
cations. I'd encourage the youngsters 
to start electronic experimenter clubs, 
radio clubs, computer clubs, science 
fair clubs and so on. id encourage the 
youngsters to get together to help each 
other learn more about all kinds of sci- 
entific things 

If Jordan is going to cover every- 
thing, it'll take several TV stations, and 
the people will need VCRs to tape 
courses broadcast at inconvenient 
hours. Once broadcast, the tapes can 
be made available for home rental. 

There is nothing at all the matter with 
Arab intelligence. They just need edu- 



cation and they'll give the rest of the 
world a good run for their money, The 
method I've described would provide 
this education at the lowest possible 
cost. It also wouldn't be held up for 1 
to 20 years while new teachers are 
trained. 

A few Arab countries have oil. but 
most have little more than their people 
as a resource. Educated, they can be 
Ihe most valuable resource in the 
world Uneducated, they are likely to 
be frustrated and thus easily gulled by 
fanatics. When we see screaming Arab 
mobs, we know we are not looking at 
educated people. 

Japan has shown how it's done, 
Were learning many things from 
them. Perhaps the Arabs can too. 
Japan has well over a million licensed 
amateurs so far. The Arab countries, 
what, dozens? Outside of Jordan, I 
doubt it. 

if they start teaching science to Arab 
youngsters we may start seeing hun- 
dreds of thousands appearing on our 
bands. Then, If we've decided to use 
amateur radio to actually talk with peo- 
ple instead of coercing QSL cards out 
of them for DXCC credit, we may finally 
have people -to- people communica- 
tions and start building friendships. 

Yes. t make it sound simple. I think it 
is. I'd like to see His Majesty King Hus- 
sein start providing education for his 
people and the nearby Palestinians in 
Israel. Then, via educational video 
tapes, Jordan can become the educa- 
tion center for the entire Arab world. 

Science teaching will go much faster 
if the video courses are supported with 
good textbooks and science labs. I've 
some inexpensive, creative solutions 
to these needs too. 

No, you can't force people to be edu- 
cated, We've certainly proven that 
here in the U.S. where our compulsory 
system is a world class failure. But you 
can make it so much fun that kids learn 
because they enjoy it. And the more 
they learn, the more successful they II 
be as a people and the wealthier their 
countries will become. And this can be 
done in one generation. 

We've seen this in microcosm in am- 
ateur radio. No one forced us as kids to 
learn radio theory. We did it because 
we wanted to, because we enjoyed rt. 
And the more we learn, the more po- 
tential we have (or success m today's 
technological world, We are no longer 
tolerant of computer-tl I iterate people in 
our workplaces. 

tf we can get the Arabs hooked on 
education, who knows perhaps 
we'll even be able to sell ihis radical 
idea here in the U,SJ 

Am I suggesting that it's possible to 
turn nomadic goatherds into rocket sci- 
entists in one generation? Vep. that's 
exactly what I'm suggesting 

Since this is an editorial, not a book, t 
haven't gone into depth with my entire 
plan, t thought I'd mention that just to 
ward off the brickbats from negative 
people. Let me remind you that suc- 
cessful creative thinkers are positive. 
They tend to think in terms of solutions 
rather than problems. Is that the way 
yew; think? 



76 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1991 



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YIG Sweeper 

Last month I described the YIG 
(Yttrium Iron Garnet) oscillator and its 
internal construction. I also covered a 
sweep ramp generator, part of the YIG 
sweep oscillator project This month, 
I'U finish the project with the drive cir- 
cuits for Ihe Y IG oscillator s Trie sweep 
ramp generators tie directly into the 
driver circuits, providing both the YIG 
current control amplifiers and the oscil- 
loscope with an external, horizontal 
drive, for full synchronization of both 
the YIG oscillator and oscilloscope. 

The sweep ramp generator has con- 
trols for ramp symmetry and sweep 
length. The 1458 op amp operates 
from a ^ 1 5 and - 15 volt power supply 
This is necessary because of the need 
lor a wide swing between both power 
supply rails Sweep ramp voltages for 
!his op amp vary from +14 to -14 
volts. 

The power supply requirement is 
+ 15 voits at 1 amp. The negative sup- 
plies do not need to be high current 
regulators Two are required: -5 volts 
and -15 vofis. If your YIG ts an HP 
type, you will need to add a -10 volt 
regulator 

Before 1 get into the drive circuit I 
thought I would provide you with some 
details on other YIG prnouts that I have 
run across. I don't Know if you can lo- 
cate the same type I have, but the infor- 
mation should prove helpful. For the 
Hewlett-Packard 2-6 GHz YIGs. power 
goes to a 1 4-pin DIP sockel on top. Pin 
1 is ground, pin 3 is - 20 voJls, pin 6 is 
— 10 volts, pin 10 is the main coil post- 
live terminal and pin 1 1 is main coil 
negative, The 3.8 to 6 GHz HP YIG 
prnouts are ihe same, with the addition 
of pin 14 being the FM modulation 
drive input pin. 

John W7HOJ + who designed these 
driver circuits from multiple sources, is 
happy to share this project with the ex- 
periment-oriented amateur. The circuit 
is as simple as possible, while still mak- 
ing a very useful YiG sweeper /driver 

Circuit Description 

Op amp U1a + an isolation amplifier in 
the sweep output, couples into the 
summing amplifier, (Jib. U3a, another 
isolation amplifier, is in the voltage di- 
vider, the center frequency control. 
The high and low limit potentiometers 
there are relay-selected in each of the 
three different frequency ranges. 

The details of multi-YIG switching 
aren't in the schematic. U2 and Q1 are 
the YIG driver current source, wilh Q1 
connected as an emitter follower. This 
increases the current driving capability 
of U3 to the high values most YIGs 
need. The current limiting resistor in 

78 73 Amateur Radio Today * May. 1991 



VHF and Above Operation 



the emitter lead {25 ohms) is suitable 
for YIGs drawing about 180 mA. You 
need a 10 ohm resistor for 600 mA 
YIGs. 

The comparator U3b serves as a fail 
safe should the operator turn the cen- 
ter frequency controls too high for the 
YIG. It samples the voltage on the 
wiper of the center frequency control, 
and when the voltage exceeds the de* 
sired threshold, it's directed tc a high 
value current limiting resistor. Every- 
thing stops until the center frequency 
potentiometer is returned below this 
threshold. 

Construction is straightforward. You 
can use perl board. In the future I may 
do a PC B layout for the circuit. It's my 
way of doodling in my spare time. 

The leads for the YIG oscillator 
should have ferrite beads slipped over 
each end of (he magnet driver coil 
leads. And. if you want to do CW opera- 
tion t you need to put a large capacitor 
across the coil, to swamp out coil reso- 
nance. Keep the power supply leads 
short and well -bypassed I usually grab 
a handful of 0.01 + 0.1 and 10pF capaci- 
tors, and sprinkle them around gener- 
ously to minimize stray signal interfer- 
ence. It's a cheap fix. Rather than 
trying to find the lead that's making 
trouble. I bypass all the leads. 




Photo A. Some members of the San Diego Microwave Group during the 1990 10 
GHz contest on Mt Soledad Left to right: John WB68KR. Kerry N6IZW, and 
Chuck WB6IGP. Photo by Bert KGBTO. 



Mailbox Comments 

The Ventura AFtC wrote me oi their 
latest laser OSG Dick WA6JOX at 
Pumpkin Center and Steve WA6EJO 
at Ml. Finos. California, 32 mites apart, 
easily pointed the laser at each oiher 
after determining accurate locations 



with 10 GHz M beam" headings. The 
laser receiver was constructed out of 
4-mch PVC pipe with a front lens and a 
C7138 photomulliplier for the laser 
light detector Dick stated that flashing 
spotlights in the direction the X-band 
srgnals came from helped, and he 
could easily see the bright light on Mt, 
Pin os; but the crew on Pinos had diffi- 
culty sorting out his spotlight from 
nearby city lights. 

Aimed at each other, the lasers were 
bright even at 32 miles distance. Very 
little flicker from atmospheric distur- 
bance was noted. The lasers used 
were 2-5 mW, HeNe (helium neon) 
which operate at a frequency of 474 
THz, or, if you prefer, 474,000 GHz\ 
Quite an accomplishment. 

Jack VE4JX is putting an IF and 10 
GHz wideband system together using 
pan's of an Alfa burglar alarm system. 



As microwave materials are scarce in 
Canada, he needed help obtaining 
parts. Using ihe RSGB Handbook. 
Jack is constructing a Gunn cavity. 

Got to apologize to Paul KfllWA t 
sent him a kit for the 30 MHz IF amplifi- 
er ("TO GHz Fun" m the Apni 1990 
issue). The problem was I forgot to In- 
clude the PC boards. Must have had 
toooo much sugar in my coffee that 
morning. By the way, Paul's call is es- 
pecially great for an amateur living in 
IOWA. 

Steven of Steven CoakEey Video Mi- 
crowave Services, referring to my Au* 
gust 1990 column, says rt can be sim- 
ple to receive commercial microwave 
transmissions All you need is an SSB 
communications receiver. After tuning 
in, you demodulate the video output of 
the microwave receiver. A simrlar sys- 
tem is used In satellite communica- 



* • V- 




POTENTIOMETER 
POT£HTJa»£TD» 



Note T: Center frequency control. You can select three YIGs for different frequency ranges by individually selecting them 
via relays along with different high and tow limit pots. The schematic shows the hookup for just one YIG device. 
Note 2 Relay 4 is normally closed. If the current goes too high (actuated by the comparator from the center freQuency 
control) the relay drops out to provide a higher value of YIG current-limiting resistance. 
Note 3: Bypass alt IC power leads with 0,5 uF capacitors to ground. 



figure The spectrum analyzer dnver and out of range current timitec John Petrich W7HQJ, 9/90. 




Photo B. WB6IGP s work bench, always cluttered, always changing. 



Irons to send long distance calls 

The video has all the SSB channels 
stacked from about 20 Hz 10 about 8 
MHz. Steven suggests I he book, The 
Hidden Signals on Satellite TV, by 
Thomas P. Harrington and Bob Cooper 



Jr., available from Howard Sams Pub- 
lishing or through Uncle Wayne's 
Bookshelf." 

Well, Steven, if the signals are 
analog in nature, you can receive 
them This scheme is used to transmit 



and receive microwave voice chan- 
nels. I did a poor job of trying to explain 
analog and digital. Analog systems 
seem to be in decline, with most sys- 
tems going digilal Digital format 
makes reception dependent on a digit- 



al terminal of similar type. There are 
test sets (o do this, but none yet in 
surplus, 

Myron KA9THQ liked the switching 
power supply article in the August 1 990 
issue, and thanked me for helping him 
solve a problem. He had been looking 
for a simple way to run his printer on 1 2 
volts DC. He had a bushel of old CO 
power supplies, and would you be- 
lieve , the transformer he found is just 
what the doctor ordered— 1 10 primary 
and 24 volts secondary. One thing: 
Watch out for spiking on the drains of 
the FETs I used a senes 0. 1 uf capaci- 
tor and a 5 Ohm resistor to minimize 
spiking. The formula for circuit fre- 
quency is TC = 4.40 times (R * C), Or 
TC (60 Hz) = 4.4 • (36k • 0.1 uF), in 
actual tests, some variations in the ca- 
pacitor suggest slightly higher values 
( +0,01 |jF> to trim to proper frequency. 

Alva KD4BH also wrote to me about 
this article, wondering why I didn't in* 
elude a schematic. Well, Alva, I just 
forgot to send it in for that column. See 
the Updates section in this issue for the 
schematic. 

That 1 s it for this month. Next month, 
with the help of Steve WA6EJO, well 
explore laser communications. As al- 
ways. J will be glad to to answer any 
questions related to our VHF/UHF 
microwave bands. Please send an 
SASE for prom pi reply. 73* s Chuck 
WB61GP 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 79 




Number 28 on your Feedback card 



FECIAL EVENTS 

Ham Doings Around the World 



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499S, 

SEMIDJL MM The Paul Bunyan ARC witl 
hokl its annual Hamfest from 7 AM-3: 30 PM 
at the Moose Lodge VE Exams. Talk- in 
146.13/.73, Fof info call or write Don lilies 
NtiMAZ, R.R. 2 Box 187 AA, Bemidji MN 
56601 {218)751-9254 



MAY 4-5 



ANDERSON, SC The Blue Ridge ARS w.!i 
sponsor the Greenville Hamfest/Eteciruntc 
Flea Market at the Anderson County Fair- 
grounds from a AM-5 PM Sat.. 8 AM-3 PM 
Sun WaJk-ifl license exams Camping, free 
parking. Set-ups with advance registration. 
Advance tickets £4, S5 at the gate. For tick- 
ets, info, send SASE to Blue Ridge ARS, PO 
Box 675 1 , Greenville SC 29606. 

SIERRA VISTA, AZ The Cochise ARA will 
hold its annual Hamfest at the club training 
facility, 5 miles east of town on Slate Rte 90, 
then 2 mites south on Moson Ret Alt ham 
radio, computer and related businesses are 
invited Free tailgating VEEKams Overnight 
RV camp*ng tor dub members (no hookups} 
Facilities for the handicapped Taik- 
14653 or 146 76 (-6) Contact N7iNK(6Q2} 
378-315$ after 6 PM, or wnte to CARA, PO 
Box 1355. Sierra Vista AZ 65636. 



MAY 5 



SANDWICH, IL De Kalb Hamfest, span 
sored by Kishwaukee RC. will be held at the 
Sandwich Fairgrounds, beginning at B AM 
Set-up at 6 AM. Overnight camping, no 
hookups Tickets S4 in advance with 2 stubs. 
After Apr iSlh, and at the gate. 55. Tables 
Si each Ta iigate space free with paid ticket. 
Talk-in on 146.13/ 73 and 146 52. For reser- 
vations, make check payable to KRC and 
send with an SASE to Howard Newqmst 
WA9TXW, PO Box 264. Sycamore IL6Q17B 

ALEXANDRIA. VA Fairfax Computer Fair/ 
Flea Market will be sponsored by (he Thomas 
Jefferson High School for Science and Tech- 
nology FTSA, in conjunction with the Capital 
PC Use r Group . The proceeds w I II go to bene- 
fit computer oriented education This event 
will be held at the Thomas Jefferson High 
School from 9 AM-4 PM Contact Mark 
Bakke. (301} 530-1303 or Mart Rau, (703} 
754-9659 

ST. PETERSBURG, FL The St Petersburg 
ARC will sponsor a Hamfest at Lake Maggiore 
Park from &AM-3 PM. ram or shine Free 
parking No tailgating, VE Exams from 10 
AM-2PM Admission $4, kids under 12 free, 
Set-up al 7 AM. For registration Otto Suplfski 
WB2SLQ, {914} 969- 1053 

YOtfKERS. NY The Metro 70cm Network 
will hold a Giant Electronic Fteamarket at the 
Lincoln High School from 9 AM-3 PM, Free 
parking VE Exams from 1 AM-2 PM. This is 
one of 3 Giant Electronic Flea Markets The 
other two will be on Sept 29th. 1 991 and Jan 
19th, 1992 Severs can gel Ira price by regis- 
tering for all three events and paying the full 
amount m advance. Deadline dales are 5/3/ 
91 , a/10/91 , 1/B/92. Registered tables S1 5 for 
the first, $10 for each additional Bring your 
own table at Si 80 per foot $10 minimum. 
Tables $20 al the door, $2.50 per foot Re- 
served tables and space will be hefd only to 9 



AM. Mo refunds without notification of cancel- 
lation 72 hours in advance of each event 
Admission $4, kids under 12 Iree Set-up at 7 
AM. To register, can Otto Supttsht WB2SLQ. 
(914)969-1053 



MAY 11 



MANITOWOC, Wl The Mancorad RC wil 
hold its annual Hamfest from S AM-5 PM at 
the Manitowoc County ExpoCtt Flea Markel 
(amateur, computer. SWL) VE Exams. Ad- 
vance tickets $2, S3 at the door. B' tables $3. 
with electric outlei SB. SASE to MancoradRC, 
POBox 204, Manitowoc Wl 54220. 

SPRINGDALE, Afl The Northwest Arkan- 
sas ARC will hold "HAMFEST 91" at i he 
Rodeo Grounds Community Building from S 
AM-4 PM Free admission Tables S5 each, 
advance registration required Tailgating $4 
per vehicle Free parking Talk-in on 146. 76 
( -.600). Contact Jim Hemngion K&5ITL PO 
Box 276, West Fofk AJR 72774. (501} 839- 
2436 after 4 30 PM. Via packet KB5fTL # 
KA5BML.ARVSA. 



MAV12 



ATHENS, OH The Athens County ARA will 
hold its 12th annual Hamfest at the City Rec 
Center from 6 AM-3 PM, Admission S4 per 
ham. spouses allowed in Iree. Free Tailgating 
space. Indoor space by advance registration 
only. For Info write to Carl J. Denbow 
KA6JXG. 63 Morris Ave,, Athens OH 45701 
For registration contact John Biddie 
WD8JLM, 30 Wonder H4ts Dr, Athens OH 
45701. (614 594-8901 after 6 PM. Talk-in 
145.15/55 MHz 



MAY 18 



FORESTDALE, HI The Rhode Island Ama- 
teur FM Repealer Service. Inc. will hold their 
annual Spring Auction and Flea Market at the 
VFW Post 6342 The Flea Markel starts at 6 
AM. spaces are $5 each The Auction will be 
from 1 1 AM-3 PM Free admission. Talk-in on 
146 76. Contact Rick FatrweathetKlKYL PO 
Box 561. HarnsviBe Rf 02830 Of can (461) 
566-0566 between 7-8 PM. 

EPHR ATA, PA The Ephiaia Area Repeater 
Society, Inc will hold the Lancaster County 
Hamfest at the Ephrata Senior High School 
beginning at 8 AM. Set-up al 6:30 AM Handi- 
cap accessible. Admission $4. Tailgating $3. 
Tables $6. Tafk-in on 145.45, 146.52 and 
444.65 MHz. For info/reservations contact 
Tom Youngberg K3RZF, (215} 267-2514 at* 
ter 6 PM, or write, EARS > 906 Cfearwew 
Awt, EptrrataPA 17522 

PEWITT. IA The Cfinion ARC will hold 
"HAMFEST 91" at the 4 H County Fair 
Grounds starting al & AM- Set-up at 6 AM 
Over-night security. Talk-in 14 7 06 and 
145 430. VE Exams start at 9 AM ATV and 
DX packet cluster seminars. Contaci Darryi 
Petersen KDiPY, RR1 Box 84, Bryant IA 
52727 

CADILLAC, Ml The Wexaukee ARA will 
sponsor therr annual Swap and Shop at the 
Cadillac Middle School from S AM-1 PM. Ad- 
mission S3 tables S6 Talk-m on 146.38/ 58 
repeater. Contact Dan Schmidt KE8KU, (616} 
775-G99&, or write, Wexaukee ARA, PO Box 
163. Cadillac Mi 49601 



MAY 19 



WABASH, IN The Wabash County ARC will 
hold its 23rd annual Hamfest al the Wabash 
County 4-H Fairgrounds from G AM-4 PM 
Free overnlghl camping. Advance tickets 
$4.50, $5 at the door. Amateur exams will be 
given for Tech-Extra by the North Central 
Indiana Examiner Team from 6 AM-Noon 
Talk-.n- 147 63/03. 146 52/52, 146 947.94 
For ticket tnto send SASE to Don Spangter. 
235 soothwood Or, Wabash IN 46992. (219) 
563-5564. 

PEOTONE, IL The annual Hamfest spon- 
sored by the Kankakee ARS will be held at the 
Will County Fairgrounds from 6 AM-2 PM 
Set-up 6 AM -8 AM. Free parking. Overnight 
RV parking, no hookups. Advance tickets 
$3. 50 r $4 at the door. Talk-in on 146. 34/, 94. 
Contact KARS, C/O Frank DalCanton 
MSP WW, 1 17 Kristma Dr. Bourbonnais IL 
60914. (8t5)932-595Gaftef 7PMCST. 



MAV25 



DURHAM, NC The Durham FM Assn. will 
hold its 18th annual 'DURHAM-PEST" un- 
der the south parking deck of the South 
Square Matt shopping center Wheelchair ac- 
cessible, VE Exams contaci Pete Gooisby 
KY4Y, 120 Radctift Circle, Durham NC 
27713, (91$) 544-3215. Advance tickets are 
$4, S5 al the door Please SAS£ with your 
order to R,P Buehtmann N4IOA, 1314 
Chaney Rd , Raleigh NC 27606 For table into 
and registration contaci Thomas D Ferrell 
WA4MWT, 3012 Glendale Ave., Durham MC 
27707 r (919) 220-5018, or Sid Edwards 
W4QWM, 1700 High SU Durham NC 27707, 
(919) 489-2933. To reserve space and ad- 
vance tickets, contact Sid Edwards W4QWM> 
(919) 469-2933 before B 15 PM 



MAY 26 



WEST FRIENDSHIP, UD The Maryland FM 
Assn. will sponsor its annual Memorial Day 
Hamfest (for amateur radio related rtems on- 
ly), at the Howard County Fairgrounds from 8 
AM-3 PM (premises musi be cleared by 5 
PM), Talknn on 146.16/.76. 223,16/22476 
and 449,007444.00 WAS DZD repeater Dona- 
tion $4 r laijgalrng $3. Tables $15 in advance, 
$20 at the door (if available) Only PAID table 
reservations accepted. Make checks payable 
to MFMA Inc . and SASE to Metvin Sayie 
WA3KZR, 15609 Pointer Ridge Dr. Borne 
MD207I6. (301)249-6147 Commercial ven- 
dors must have proper lax/Ucense certificates 
avaUabte All proceeds wilt be used to im- 
prove the Club's repeater system. 

CHICAGO, IL Chicago ARC will hold the 
annual Hamfest at De Vry Inst of Tech. , from 
8 AM-3 PM. Set-up at 6 AM. Tickets $3 in 
advance, $4 at the door. Wrlle to CARC t 5G31 
W. Irving Park Rd., Chicago IL 60634 Or call 
(312) 545-3022 Talk-in 147.225 * 600 PL. 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 



IftAV 



VERMONT Throughout the year Special 
Event Stations from Vermont wrll be operat- 
ing 25 kHz up tfom the bottom of the Nnvice 
and General bands to help celebrate Ver- 
mont's 200th Anniversary. RTTY/AMTOR/ 
etc. will be In the digital sub-bands. To obtain 
a special Certifies le, send $1 and a SASE to 
Amateur Radio Btcentenniat Project. PO Box 
200, Granifevilte YT0S6S4. Foreign stations, 
send only SAE and tRC's, to cover postage 



MA V 3-12 



SACRAMENTO, CA The California Stale 
Railroad Museum wilt operate WB6RVR from 
the Central Padlic Depot in OkJ Sacramento, 
May 3rd-May 12lh, 1600-24002 during 
" " RA ILF Al R * 9 1 / ' la com memoraie the Muse- 
um's 10th anniversary. Frequencies: Phone 
7.270, 14.270, 21 370. and 28.370 MHz. For 
commemorative QSL f send your QSL and 
No 10 SASE lo California State Railroad Mu- 
seum. Attn Steam Trains, 111 "I" Sr, Sacra- 
mento C A 95814 



MAY 4 



GRANTSBORO. NC The CM' Country Fair 
of Pamlico Community Colfeoe wiO operate 
N4WRR from 1400-1900Z lo commemorate 
the 1 7th annual Fair Operation will be 25 kHz 
up from the General band edges and the 
Novice 10 meter phone band. Send QSL, 
QSQ number, and SASE to N4WRR, PCC. 
POBox 185> Grantsboro NC 28529-0185. 



MAY 4 



BAYONNE. NJ The Bayonne Emergency 
Management ARC. sponsored by the City oi 
Bayonne. Nj\ wilt operate W2O0V from 1 200 
UTC-24G0 UTC on May *th and 1 200 UTC- 
2400 UTC on May 5th Operation wifl be on alt 
bands from 80 meters through 440 MHz, with 
concentration in the Novice and General 
class portions Each dub member will sign 
their own call followed by "BEMARC Special 
Event Station." To receive a special Certifi- 
cate, ssnd a QSL card with an 9 X T 2 SASE 
and one unit of postage (or one IRC) to BE- 
MARC. cfoJotm Anziwno, 236PearsailAve.. 
Jersey City NJ 07305. 



MAY 10 



PROMONTORY. UT The Odgen ARC will 
operate W7STB from Promontory Summit, to 
commemorate the 1 22nd year of the dhving 
of the Gokten Spike, from 0001Z-210OZ. Fre- 
quency will be on one of the following: 3.970, 
7 270, 14.280. 21 375 or 28.415 MHz Send 
OSL and SASE to Qoden ARC f PO Box 3353, 
OgdenUT84409 



MAY 11-12 



LAS VEGASp NV The Nevada QSO Party, 
sponsored by the Frontier ARS. will be held 
from OOOOZ May 1 1th-0600Z May 12th, Fre- 
quencies: 6 through 160 meters Modes: CW/ 
SS8/RTTY/SSTV/Packet. Scoring i point for 
Phone QSO. 2 points other modes Nevada 
stations multipy by staleiprovince/country to- 
tal Non-Nevada stations multiply by number 
of Nevada counties. Awards: Certificates to 
top score of each state^pnjvmce/DXCC coun- 
try Mail entry by June 1st. 1991 to Jim Frye 
NW70. 4120 Qahhitt Ave, Las Vegas NV 
69121 



HOLLAND, Mt 1 hn (Holland ARC wilt oper- 
ate K8DAA to celebrate Tulip Time. Frequen- 
cies: Low end of General bands on 1 5 and 20 
meters, and 28400 On 10 meters For Certifi- 
cate, just work two HARC members or the 
Club station Send OSL card with calls 
worked and SASE (legal size or 9 X 12} to 
Dave Lamer WASRSA 5866 E. Chester Dr.. 
Zee land Mi 49464 



MAY 12-17 



DAVIS MTN5 t TX Amateur astronomers/ 
hams representing the Southwest Region of 
The Astronomical League, will operate K5GH 
at the 10th annual Texas Star Party, located 
naar the University of Texas' McDonald Ob- 
servatory in the Davis Mtns . from May 12th- 
17th. Frequencies: (±QRM): 2S36S. 21365, 
14265 and 7265 SSTV and CW contacts on 
request. For an astronomcaMheme OSL 
card, send QSL and SASE lo K5GH*TSP, 721 
White Dr., Garland TX 75O40. 



MAY1B 



HANFOftD,CA The Kings ARC will operate 
AA6GZ T 1600Z-2200Z, lo commemorate I he 
Centennial Anniversary of Hanford* CA. Fre- 
quencies: The General 10, 15 and 20 meter 
phone and the Novice portion of 1 maters. 
For a certiffcate, SASE to KC6HVE. PO Box 
548, Armona CA 9320Z 



MAY 18-tg 



CHICAGO, It The DuPage ARC will oper- 
ate Club station W90UP.. to commemorate 
Aimed Forces Day Operation will be from the 
U-505 submarine al The Chicago Museum of 
Science and Industry. Sat. & Sun from 1600 
UTC-2300UTC. Frequencies: 7.250. 14290, 
28 , 400 SS8 and 1 45 25 ( - . 600) . For a certifi- 
cala, send QSL and SASE lo Jack Carr 
NV9S. DARC, PO Box 71, Clarendon Rills IL 
60514. 

ST CHARLES, MO The Si Charles ARC 
will operate WBSHSt from 1300Z-2100Z as 
part of the Lewis and Ctark Rendezvous. Fre- 
quencies: 72S0, 14250, 21350. 2&410, and 
146 67, as conditions permit For SVj X 11 
certificate, send a large SASE to the St. 
Charies ARC, PO Box 1429, St Chafes MO 
63302-1429 

LONG BEACH, CA The Hollywood Chapter 
of the Lambda ARC will operate K7QG from 
the site of the annual cultural pride festival. 
ad|acent to the Queen Mary in Long Beach. 
Frequencies: General portions of the 40, 20. 
and 15 meter bands and the Novice portion of 
the 1 meter band For a special QSL, send a 
QSL card and business size SASE lo LARC, 
PO Box 91299, Long Beach CA $0609 



MAV 2B 



ANNAPOLIS, MD The United Stales Naval 
Academy ARC will operate the Club station. 
W3ADO. from 1300Z-1BOOZ, to celebrate 
commissioning week at the Naval Academy. 
Operation will be in the lower 50 kHz of the 
General and Novice phone bands. For QSL, 
send QSL (no SASE) to Peter Erpelding 
WB6MXL, UD Sellers Rd., Annapolis MD 
214m. 



80 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



Ham help 



Number 29 On your Feedback card 



We are happy to provide Ham Help listings 
free on a space available basts To make our 
fob easier and to ensure that your fisting is 
correct, phase type) or pnnt your request 
Charty. double spaced, on a fait (81$ 'xll') 
$h0ei of paper Use upper- and lower-case 
letters where appropriate Also, print num- 
bers carefully— a I, tor example, cart be mis- 
read as the tetters t or i, or even the number 7. 
You may also upload a fisting as E-mait to 
Sysop to the 73 BBS. (6D3) 525-4438. & data 
bits, parity, 1 stop bit Thank you for your 
cooperation, 

I need the manuals for tne Yaesu FRG-7 
receiver- I will pay copy and postage costs 
Tom Francis KBSOCU, RT 2 Bom 336, Leon- 
ard TX 75452 (903)568-4693 

I need a schematic or other printed material 
on a Pace FM 152 VHF transceiver. It is 
presently tuned to 1 56 MHz and I would kike to 
reiune it to the 2 meter band I will appreciate 
any help 1 can get on this project, Also, does 
anyone know the address ol Pace Comrn 
Div ., of PATHCOM, Inc.? Thanks 6 T. Jeav 
ons WAGGEF, 5825 Cedar Rd.. Ocean 
Springs MS 3956*. 

I need a schematic and/or manual for an 
EICO oscilloscope Model 470 Also, a bathtub 
cap for same: 2X5 MFD 1 S00VDC William R 
BogartKAQCWK RR2BoxS0B, Covington tN 
47932. 

I am looking for the manufacturer of a beam 
antenna. It is wound on fiberglass rods and is 
wound with copper tape instead of loading 
coils Pete Anderson W5VYV, 1209 W Cochi- 
fi Hobos NM 88240, 

Wanted: A Model J-37 CW aircraft key for 
display in a WW2 aircraft radio museum. A 
small sign indicating the name of the donor 



Your Bulletin Board 



will be placed next to the key in the museum. 
Bill Pearca W9MWO Eagles Rest, 9 Kntghts- 
bridge Place. Pueblo CO 81001- 143* (719) 
544-0691 

I would like to exchange operating and 
maintenance ideas with anyone still operat- 
ing Haillcrafter's HURRICANE transceivers. 
Please com act R.P. Paullukanis KB1TY. PO 
Box 321, Strafford NH 03884. 

Wanted: Teletype LPR35BWA w/LRB?3 
base, LMU4 motor and LBAC255BR cabinet, 
Charles T Huth. 22$ Moimore St, Tiffin OH 
44883 (419} 443-0007, 

The Dayton ARA is now accepting applica- 
tions for the 1991 Scholarship program. 
There will be eight $1500 scholarships avail- 
able this year The program is open to any 
FCC licensed amateur operator graduating 
from high school in 1991 . There are no restric- 
tions on class of license or planned course of 
study. For application forms aj>d information, 
write to OARA Scholarship Committee. 317 
Ems* Ave. Dayton OH 45405. 

Teacher of developmentally-cisadvan- 
taged high school students would appreciate 
donation of books on audio and RF equip- 
ment construction and design, intended for 
home-brewers (no college engineering texts 
please) Cannot accept equipment, maga- 
zines, or books that are moldy. I will reim- 
burse shipping at cheapest commercial rale 
(book rale, first class, or UPS), Douglas Con- 
ley. cteConiey Vision. 12008 W. 87 St Pkwy.. 
LenexaKS 66215. 

Wanted: Operating manual (or photo copy) 
for the Hickok Model 752= A tube tester 1 will 
pay all costs and postage. Hat Smith W2GKE. 
26 Linden St, Bayonne NJ 07002, (201) 436- 
1405, 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 81 




Number 30 on your Feedback card 



INTERNATIONAL 



Arnie Johnson N1BAC 
1 03 Old Homestead Hwy, 
N. Swamey NH 0343 1 

Notes from FN42 

Good news as t am writing the 
column: the fighting in the Persian Gulf 
has ended. I have made an effort to 
not write about what has been hap- 
pening, but I read In a recent Wall 
Street Journal that there was ham 
activity from Kuwait during the conflict . 
It writ be reported under the Kuwait 
banner in "Roundup w 

This month's column is colorful 
with pictures from the Greek climb* 



the founding members of Diet Ham 
Club, JG1ZQU, which consists of 21 
members of the House of Representa- 
tives , 1 member of the House of Coun- 
selors* and 59 members of the Diet 
staff. 

On another note, Ginowan City in 
Okinawa has been selected as the site 
for JARL's 33rd General Assembly, 
scheduled to be held on Sunday, May 
26,1991. 

The Annual General Assembly is 
I hat time of the year when alt participat- 
ing members reflect upon JARL's ac- 
tivities and operations, and in so doing 
promote mutual understanding, It is al- 





Photo A. Our Hambassador to South Korea, Byong-Joo Cho HL5AP t and his beautiful family. 



ers shown in last month's issue, the 
QSL card from Oiimpiada Cultural 
Barcelona '92 t a photo of Byong-Joo 
Cho HL5AP and his family, and letters 
from Hod Hallen 5Z4BH and Woodson 
Gannaway NSKVB/EA 
And now, on with the show! 

—ArnteNIBAC 

ROUNDUP 

Japan From The JARL News: l% Radio 
Amateur Becomes Minister of Posts 
and Telecommunications/ 4 reads the 
headline. Mr. Katsutsugu Sekiya 
JA5FHB t a member of the House of 
Representatives, was welcomed and 
honored as the new minister by 200 
JARL members Mr Shozo Mara 
JA1AN, President of JARL. expressed 
his congratuations and sincere expec- 
tations for Mr. Sekiya's good role for 
further promotion of amateur radio In 
Japan. 

Mr Sekiya acquired his first amateur 
radio license in 1970, and he is one of 




Pnofo B- QSL card for the Oiimpiada Cultural Barcelona *92. 



so an important meeting where the 
pros and cons of yearly programs, as 
well as the all-important budget, will be 
discussed and resolved, hopefully to 
the eventual satisfaction of all mem- 
bers, 

Kuwait From The Watt Street Jour- 
nal, March 4, 1991 v dateline Kuwait 
City. Kuwait. This article describes 
how some ol the Kuwaitis made it 
through the crisis by bartering food and 
material things. 

One of the families mentioned was 
the "Sultans/" a prominent merchant 
family. They asked that their real sur- 
name not be published because they 
fear for the lives of three family mem- 
bers still held by Iraq. Am in, mentioned 
in the following paragraph, is a mem- 
ber of that family. 

'In one way, the Sultans did contin- 
ue to defy the occupation directly. 
Seated at the computer in his base* 
ment, one of Amiri's cousins, a ham 
radio operator, continues to this day to 
run one of the few communications 
links with the outside world. Mostly, he 
has sent out personal messages to 
Kuwaitis abroad. Several months into 
the occupation, the Iraqis 
compiled a list of hams 
and made a sweep of their 
equipment. Amlri's cous- 
in politely greeted the 
soldiers at his door and 
handed them an antiquat- 
ed piece of radio gear. 
Meanwhile. Amiri contin- 
ued broadcasting from 
his basement. He also 
piled boxes of food at his 
door to distract future vis- 
itors on similar missions. " 
[Not every member of 
the " Sultan" family or 
other families were as 
lucky. Some were killed 
and some have been tak- 
en and not heard from 
since. Let us all pmy^ that 
those missing will be re- 
turned safely, and that 
the crisis in the Middle 
East will be solved to 
the satisfaction of ALL. 



Photo C. SV2AHJ, of the Greek Mountaineers' Club, QSOing with the GCR250 HF rig, WOWf 
What a view! 



82 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 




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KENYA 

RodHathn 5Z48H 
AMEMBASSY80X 55A 
APO New York 09675 

Since the 20th of September I have 
only spent two weeks in Kenya. The 
rest of that time I was in the U.S.A. or 
traveling in East Africa, 

just before I left Nairobi for the 
stales, my landlord informed me that 
he was going to put a new root on my 
house while I was gone. So + I had to 
take all of my antennas down, and I 
haverVt been on the air since, except 
for the local 2 meter repeater. I have a 
week off so I trope to get at least my 
G5RV back up. Unfortunately, the new 
roof is peaked and made of aluminum, 
where the old one was fiat concrete, 

I'm due out of here [Kenya) on& year 
from now, and have just sent in my 
brdlisl, On that list is Cairo (SU). 
Karachi (AP), Bonn (DL), and Miami 
(W47). 1 took a trip to Bahrain <A92} 
early in September, and stopped off in 
Cairo (or a few days to look the place 
over. I liked what I saw, so put it at the 
top of my list, Pakistan is also a good 
assignment, except that they refuse to 
issue ham licenses to foreigners. How- 
ever, I have a good friend, Ben 524 BG, 
who has already received that assign- 
ment, and he will do what he can to 
remedy the situation, We'll see, 

I was looking at the list of Hambas- 



sadcrs. and I have been in about hall of 
those countries, but I've only met one 
of ihe Hambassadors personalty. /Me, 
tool Hopefuify there will be mora. — 
ArnteJ While J was stationed in Manila 
from 1981 10 1965. 1 used to visit Hong 
Kong quite regularly. In fact, it is still 
my favorite place in the whole world. In 
any case, I got my VS6 license with the 
help Of Hambassador Phil Scott 
VS6CT, and operated from his QTH on 
a number of occasions. That was be- 
fore he moved to the fancy new QTH 
that I saw pictured in a recent issue. 

I'll pass along some info on what is 
happening out here as soon as 1 get 
back into the swing of things. 73. 




SPAIN 

Woodson Gannaway N5KVB/EA 

Apartado 1 1 

35450 Santa Maria de Guia 

{Las Pafmas de G.C.) 

tstas Canarias, Bspana 

Even though I still have the same 
restrictive antenna situation, I'm look- 
ing for more contacts with my friends in 
the Americas, both North and South. 
And to spread the word maybe my edi- 
tor will let me run a column or two in 
Spanish to see what we can stir up. 
(What do you readers think? — Arnmj 
Sometimes we forget how much we 
lose by assuming thai everyone 
speaks English. True, English is the 
official language of all hams, is univer- 



sally used in the sciences, and was 
recently selected as the official Ian- 
guage for the European Common Mar- 
ket, but rt is not our job to rub people's 
noses in U! If you want to be a friend to 
someone, you can pay them no greater 
compliment than to learn their lan- 
guage, and work, really work, to under- 
stand their culture M is an adventure, 

Christmas Day I visited the Soviet 
training ship Sedov, a beautiful 4-mas* 
ter. Right, a sailing ship. I've got a soft 
spot in my heart for them, and I've wail- 
ed for over two years for the chance to 
visit one. This time it finally worked out, 
and I spent a pleasant hour and a half 
with her 

I spent a few minutes with the radio 
officer, Igor, who spoke passable En- 
glish. He showed me the radio room 
and the inside of one of their Russian - 
made transmitters. It was extremely 
well laid out and well made. Big and 
heavy, he said. On a snip that is no 
problem, I replied . He was extremely 
pleasant and I'm sure he spoke other 
languages, and once again, I was hum- 
bled by the thought of our unspoken 
attitude of superiority In assuming that 
the world should speak English, and 
we ourselves shouldn't exert ourselves 
in the least to learn other languages, 
Here I am with only two languages, 
trying to decide which will be the third. 

The Sedov carries a crew of 195 v of 
which 1 23 are cadets, and has an over- 
all length of 1 175 meters. In 1982 she 
achieved a wodd speed record of 1 8.5 
knots for her class She was launched 
in 1921 as (he Magdalene Vinnen un- 
der the German Hag. In 1946 she was 



acquired by the USSR. She carries 17 
sails; I almost got to see her set sail to 
depart, but had to go teach a class 
instead. 

This year or next, I wilt be retiring my 
N5KVB/EA call tor an EAB??? call for 
the rest of the lime I live here in Spain. 
The residency papers are finally com- 
ing through, and that will be the practi- 
cal effect in this area Now Til have to 
find other ways to effectively di scour* 
age people from using me just as a 
means to get a QSL card from EA8- 
land. Where there is a will, there is a 
way. I do run Morse in Spanish, and I 
might try that on them* Tve taken 
Wayne's advice and developed a re- 
markable ability to not give signal re- 
ports even when asked over and over 
again, I guess it is a form of selective 
hearing: because if you ask or want to 
tell me about your hopes and dreams, 
what is new in your area (1 asked a 
Czech ham that and he didn't let up for 
fifteen straight minutes!), or what 
you're excited about, they just don't 
make ORM that can keep me from 
hearing you. Unfortunately I do gel 
wiped out by a lid once in a while, like 
anybody else. 

A friend is checking out the situation 
of the 500th commemorative voyage of 
Columbus in 1992 as it relates to ham 
radio. Hopefully she will come up with 
something for us Other than that, a 
Happy New Year [A tittle late but welt* 
meaning.} to all of you. with strong 
wishes that whatever happens, it leads 
us closer to the world peace and unity 
that we all need and pray for. 73 once 
again, Woodson, 




Number 31 on your Feedback card 



IRCUITS 



Great Ideas From Our Readers 



Field-Strength Meter/Carrier 

Alarm/Sidetone Monitor 

A field-strength meter has many us- 
es. Besides the normal functions of 
checking the field around an antenna 
and measuring the front-to-back ratio 
of a beam, it is also handy in the shack. 
A glance at the meter when you key 
your rig shows that the antenna is radi- 
ating power. It can also be used when 
adjusting the antenna tuner for maxi- 
mum output at minimum SWR. or 
minimum plate current if you use an 
amplifier, 

A few junk box parts added to a stan- 
dard field-strength meter will produce a 
loud audible signal when your rig— or 
your neighbor's — is keyed. Thus, it can 
also serve as a sidetone monitor. Many 
hams have separate transmitters and 
receivers, and often operate each on a 
slightly different frequency, including 
Split operation. Unless they have 
sidetone monitors, operation can be 
difficult. An audible monitor like the 
one described here is somewhat loud 
(a piece of tape over the alarm unit will 
help), but it will enable you to send 
accurate CW. 



1 originally designed and built this 
instrument because the ham down- 
stairs—my son Kraig WB2 PL W— oper- 
ates 100 watts r and our outdoor anten- 
nas are mere feet apart. What I needed 
was a earner-operated alarm to warn 
me to ground my antenna, to avoid 
high levels of RF being pumped into 
my transceivers , whenever he decided 
to go on the air 

Figure 1(a) shows the result. I had 
already built a field-strength meter, so I 
merely added the few parts necessary 
for the audible signal. If you're building 
this instrument from scratch, a simpler 
and cheaper version is shown in Figure 
1{b), 

In operation, the 2N3904 transistor 
is cut off in the absence of an RF sig- 




nal, and no current is drawn from 
(he 9-volt battery. When a strong 
RF carrier is present, it is rectified 
by the 1N34A diode which places a 
positive bias on the transistor base, 
turning it on, The piezoelectric alarm 
forming the collector load draws be- 
tween 8 and 12 mA through the tran- 
sistor, and emits a loud sound. There is 
no noticeable time delay in the circuit; 
it will follow even a very rapid keying. 
An SPST switch controls collector op- 
erating voltage, so you can turn the 
audible section off white operating, as 
desired 

Any small NPN transistor will work in 
this circuit, as will any RF diodes. The 
1N914 in the emitter is there to assure 
that the transistor remains cut off un 
less a very strong carrier is detected. 
This is necessary in some cases, if you 
are relatively near the transmitter tow- 
er of a local radio broadcast station. 
The "'antenna" for the device can be 
several feet ot wire, the length depend- 
ing upon the strength ot the carrier of 



r **T 



* <p 



« 



ih 



• >i ±Ci 



4 * I 




your own or any nearby ham transmit- 
ting antenna. I use about 8 feet of 
hookup wire as an antenna for the me- 
ter. My transmitter is a 20-watter, and 
my son's runs 100 watts. My dipole and 
his antenna array are about 30 feet 
from my operating position. 

The piezo alarm element I used is 
available for $1 from Hosfett Electron- 
ics, Inc., 2700 Sunset Blvd.. 
Steubenviile OH 43952 (Cat. No. 
LERT) and operates from 2 to 12 volts 
DC. Any similar device will work as 
well, and you may have One in your 
junk box. The transistor, diodes. RF 
choke (if used) and bypass capacitor 
are not critical, and are available from 
Radio Shack and most mail order deal- 
ers, if you don't already have them in 
your junk box, 

J. Frank Brumbaugh KB4ZGC 

Buffalo NY 



Figure 1. Schematics for the field-strength meter (a), and for the simpler 
version (b)< 





Parts List 


C..C2 


1 -0.2S nF disc, ceramic 


0t,02 


1N34A or equivalent 


03 


tNSi4.iH4l48.orequivatert 


111 


Surplus meter. t00 uA-1 mA 


AFC! 


t-2^roH 


R1 


5k or lOkQ potentiometer 


01 


2N3S04{ECG1 23 equivalent) 


All 


Piezoelectric alarm unit 


B1 


9V battery 



84 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 199 1 



Covert Hamming 0™^^^^? 20 





Photo C, Deiail of The microphone and PTT assemblies. (Photo bv 
And\\\6KAS.) 




Figure I. The original microphone wiring 
diagram. 




Figure!. The modified covert wiring scheme. 



three pins. Jumper the 
center pin to the pin 
which connects to the 
case, thereby creating a 
2-pin element like the 
Radio Shack model. 

After checkout, use a 
glob of silicon sealant 
where the wires enter 
the housings. This adds 
tensile strength. 

You need some manu- 
al dexterity to solder 
the mike element. Be 
careful to avoid solder 
bridges and burned 
wires. Don't overheat 
the pins; there's an 
FET inside, and you 
could damage it! 
Now that you've assembled your covert 
mike, just clip it onto your pocket or shirt 
collar and route the ptt switch down 
your sleeve or anywhere you can easily 
access it. Connect a small earphone to a 
mini-phono plug for receive and you're 
ready for some coven hamming (see Photos 
A and B). 

The next time you're at a hamfest and you 
sec someone talking to himself, it could be 
that he *s been out in the sun too long + , . on the 
other hand, it could be that he's an Undercov- 
er Ham. 

Eldon Ryan K6BRP can be reached at 22421 
Ladeene Avenue, Torrance CA 90505, 




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■ *-^ *■ - — r ■ - - * 




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AR1993 ARRL 1991 Handbook (68th ed.) ^ 
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AR3545 Antenna Compendium Vol 2 42 papers 
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REFERENCE '= 



CTJC30 The Commodore Ham's Companion by 
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[J5H24 Radio Handbook, 23rd Ed. by wmiam t, 

ANTENNAS^ 



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ARA.141 Interference Handbook Wriiien from an 
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0ID65 The Beginner & Handbook of Amateur 
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I2F76 Basic Etectrontea Pnpmdby tht Bumat of 
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10A34b • Simple, Low-cofrt Wire Antennas 
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1 0AM" All About VHF Amateur Radio by William 
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OIP22 The Packet Radio Handbook by Jonathan 
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AE2I*77 Data Book Vahabfc aid to she RF design 
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AR2960 Trartsmia&ion Line Transformers (2nd 
ed«] by Dr. Jerry Sevick W2FM1 Practical designs ;md 
Hpecific information on construction techniques and 
sources of material. More designs for antenna tuners, 
hybrids, and for Ihe VHF and UHF bandi. 272 pp. 
120.00 

AJ22& First Steps <n Radio h fassaj Ma* 
W1F8 Series of ^aTartkka Sec ctmsponeati assem 
bled tnto practical cmeuits and ho* the c»reviu make up 
yottf radio gear. 15.00 

ARRL License Manuals All the theory you need to 
pais, your test. Complete FCC question pooh with an- 
swers, 

AR237.<i Technician Class $6,00 

Alt : ik ? General Class S6.00 

AR0 1 66 Advanced Class $6.0® 

AR2391 Extra Class S«.O0 

AR0410 Yagi Antenna Design 



AA3!«9 ORP Clanlci Coilection of anklet from 
last 1 5 ycarc of ARRL poblicaf ions on boikfing rece»v ■ 
ers H transmitters, transcetver. accessories^ 28* pp. 
$12.00 

AR3IX5 The Satellite Experimenter'* Hand- 
book, (2nd Ed.} by Martin Davidoff K2UBC 
Expanded and revised, this 2nd edition of "The Satel- 
lite Experimenter's Handbook" is your guide tn using 
and dcfifning satelittcs # fOonring on those buiJt by 
aad for die izaernationaJ radio ainaAeur eotntnttaaty 
S2t\M 

AR0477 Low Band Dsfng Hem to meet Ae cnai- 
lento of the diffezent forms of 160. 80. and 40 meter 
propagation with effecfive aoiennas. eouapment, and 
operaimg iirategies- $10,00 

AR20.V) Your Gateway to Packet Radio (2nd ad.) 
Tells everything you need to know about tbis popular 
new i runic, how In get started, equipment you need, and 
more. $12.00 

ARIA Mi FCC Rule Book {8th ad.) a must for every 
active radio amateur. $9.00 



I as a tenet st 
and expanded by Dr. Lawson IIS M 

AR04J7 ARAL Repeater Directory 1990-1991 
Almost 18,000 listings widi aver 1200 d^gipeaters 
B*nd plans, CTCSS I PL^i Time Gart^ cnmpttation of 

fraiuency coord inaiori. ARRL Special Service Gubs, 
and beacon listing from 1 2 MHz to 24GH2. $6.00 

A82I71 Hints and Kinks Find the answer to that 
tricky problem. Ideas for ictlmg up your gear for 

cotnftmablc.efficienioperaiiiin SS.OO 

CODE TAPES = 



AR2I03 Satellite Anthology The latest 
on OSCARs 9 chroogb 1 3 as writ as the RS 
Information on the qaeaf <ujaaf modes, tracking anten 
nas, KUDAK. microcoinpuier. and more! $5.00 

AfU89ft Space Almanac by Attkomy It, Curtis 
KJkXK Captuns the brcaiiht4king recent news from 
space Includes mformation on Amateur Radio satel- 
lite*- Find almost everything about man's trip to the 
stars, 960 pp. $20.00 

AK2US? Complete DX er (2nd ed.) by Bob Lotkrr 
W^Kbtt Learn how to hunt DX and obtain hard lo-gei 
QSL cards. $12.00 



:•■ 



u~ia 



J at 

ofhomx htrtr gvium fair bctntn thu 

tfw &&*iff tnt tfftfr rpemiutj leu tmm* 



±**id* 

■oi. b'i jatbtft-prxvt 
The Stwtltr 
?M m Mi 



mmmqm 

AMBjakaAf 

Uat nW aaad OVnatber and y** U *r Aett btft*r \xm Inter* tt a *n* ttwmbi do it Wq/iung, KKpm aide ab m on m*vwbty 

npftraf* trt caMie irrepardbit, trrrvrnibte, permanent brain damage t/rttie Wjvhi' acceptr rw mpuniibiiity whatewfir 

unythtftg tiuu httppent m ihrttfwhftarejbolish enemxb kt me the Gwrnanmi Jf?wpm usi<* 



73T05 ■■Geneste ,, $5.95 

5 wpm— Tbis is the beginning tape, taking you through 
the 2t> letirrs. 10 numherK, ;ind necessary puna mil ion. 
complete with practiec tvery step of the way, The 
ease of learning: gives confidence even lo the faint of 
hcafl. 



TJTII "Back Breaker" 15,95 

11+ wpm— Code proopi again, us brisk 13+ wpntso 
you 1 1 be really at ease when yon sit down in front of a 
steely-eyed votumeer examiner who suns sending you 
plain language code at only 1} per. You II need Ota 
extra margin to overcome the sheer panic universal in 
most test situations. You've come this far, so don't get 
code shy now! 



7JT06 "The Stickler" UM 

6+ wpm— This is the praclicc tape for those who ftn> 
vived Ihe 5 wpm Tape, and if *. also the tape for (he 
Novice and Technician licenses, It is comprised of one 
solid hour of code. Characters arc sent at 13 wpm and 
spaced at 5 wpm. Code groups are entirely random 
character* sent in Eruups of frvr — detniae^ not memo- 
riaatatf 



73130 "Cow^iaoutV' $5,95 

20 * *pro— CncfTatiilatMWH' Okay, me challenge of 
code it what's gotten you this far. so don "fouls now. Go 
for me extra class license. We send the code faster man 
20 per It "s like wearing lead weiphls on your feet when 
you mn: You'll wonder why the examiner is sending so 
slowly f 



r .....a.-.........-... 1 

Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form 

' You may order by mail, telephone, or fax. AH payments are to be ' 

I in US funds. Allow 3 weeks for delivery* | 



Item # 


Title 


Qty. 


Price 


Total 
































































SHIPPING 

TOTAL 




SHIPPING 


^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^_^^^^^^^ 



I 
I 
I 
■ 
I 
I 
■ 
I 



I U.S. add £3.00 mall. $4.00 UPS. 
Canada add $4,00 mall. 



■ 
■ 
i 



I U, P S. to Canada and all foreign orders FOB Peterborough, NH. 



Name 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 



] Street 



■ City 

1 TOTAL S 



State 



Zip 



I 
I 
I 
I 

■ Telephone: (603) 924^196 FAX: (603) 924-8613 ' 

■ Mall: 73 Magazine, Attn. Uncle Wayne, PO Box 3080, Peterborough, NH 03458 * 

LTW0591 . 



Card* 



LlAB DMC PVISA □ Check/Money Order 
Expiration Date 




Number 32 on your Feedback card 



ANDOM OUTPUT 



Are You Having Enough 
Radio Fun? 

A few months ago, Wayne came to me 
and said: "How about publishing a 
tabloid-lype magazine, just for the new- 
comers to amateur radio? We could fill it 
with simple construction projects and 
easy theory articles so people could actu- 
ally start to understand what they have 
memorized to pass the tests. We'd review 
every kit we could get our hands on. and 
we'd review all the latest gear from a 
Novice/Tech point of view We could pub- 
lish articles about how to get started in 
packet. ATV. moonbcunce, microwaves. 
DXtng, RTTY. satellites and all the other 
fun areas of ham radio, We could even 
repnnt some of the great stuff from the 
30-year history J 73." 

Well, of course I thought this was a great 
idea. You don't have to be a rocket scien- 
tist to understand most of the stuff we put 
i nto 73 , but we sti 1 1 get lots of letters a ski ng 
for easier construction projects Even some 
lotos who have been hams for 20 years or 
more could benefit from a publication 
that's totally geared to the newcomer, 

"What should we call it?" I asked. 

"Hmmmm , . . ." Wayne paused. "How 
about Radio Funl It's short, would look 
good at the top of a masthead, and it de- 
scribes the whole concept in two simple 
words " 

"OK Sounds great' How many new 
Staff people do you think we should hire?" 
I asked 

"Mcrra" 

"NoneT" 

"None at least (or now. Let's just do 
it with the staff we nave and see how it 
goes." 

"OK." I said, though a bit less enthusi- 
astically than before. It would be hectic, 
especially when both magazines came to 
deadline at about the same time, but the 
people who put together 73 every month 
are some of the best in the publishing busi- 
ness They could handle it 

"So, , I guess you wanl a business 
plan, advertising rates, a production sched- 
ule and all the rest." I started making a few 
notes on a legal pad, "When should we 
launch this? How about next fall?" 

Wayne didn't miss a beat. "How about 
in 90 days ... just in time for Oayton?" 

You have to understand something 
about Wayne Green , He ts not fond of be- 
ing lold why something can't be done. He 
is less fond of people who find problems 
without findtng solutions, He also has very 
little patience with people who want to 
write reports, schedule meetings, "do" 
lunch or partake in all the other time-wast- 
ing activities that are a substitute for actu- 
ally working in your average American 
business, I was trapped, and I knew It 

"We'll get right on it," 

A New Ham Publication 

For the past three months, the entire 
staff has been hard at work, making 
Wayne 1 s idea of a newcomers' magazine 
a reality. Ads have been sold, columnists 
have been lined up. articles have been 
picked and edited, and the end result 
will as Wayne pred <cted " be intro- 
duced at Dayton. 

Radio Fun ts for every ham, especially 
Novices and Techs, who wants to have 
more fun with amateur radio. We want to 
encourage everyone lo upgrade, try a new 
mode or build a circuit. We wanl to give 



David Cassidy Nl GPH 

you the confidence to build a simple QRP 
ng and then go up on top of a mountain 
and have a ball with it. We want you to get 
involved with your local club, throw out all 
the old lads, and start promoting amateur 
radio as the fun hobby that it is, 

Radio Fun will have monthly columns 
explaining radio theory. This is the stuff 
that most of us simply memorized In order 
to pass the test, Don't panic I This will be 
easy, if you follow the monthly column, 
you' II start to understand basic electronics 
and radio. Then we'll take you through the 
General class material, so your upgrade 
wilt be a snap. We've got Gordon West 
WB6NQA lo write the monthly upgrade 
column. II you've ever been to one of Gor- 
don's upgrade classes, or if you've even 
listened to his CW training tapes, you 
know thai this js going to be tun 

Radto Fun wants you to have tun with 
whatever license you have. That's why 
we've got people like Carole Perry 
WB2MGP and Michael Geier KB1UM to 
write columns on all kinds of lun things to 
do. Bill Brown WB8ELK is going to help 
you get started in some of the less active 
modes like ATV, UHF/VHF DXing and mi- 
crowaves. We want you to have lun with 
amateur radio, and we're going to show 
you how to do it. 

You want simple construction articles? 
We got "em* By the bushel barreMuii! QRP 
rigs, antennas, test gear, station acces- 
sories you name it. we got it. We'll 
make sure even a beginner can under- 
stand how to do it. and we'll always make 
sure that you can get the parts. 

How about kits? We'll be reviewing ev- 
ery kit we can. We'd actually build them 
and report to you on how the kit rates Are 
the instructions clear? Are all the parts 
included? Does the project work as adver- 
tised? Was the company available to help 
with any questions? This is the stuff you 
need to know BEFORE you buy a 
kit, , and we'll tell you 

All product reviews in Radio Fun will be 
from a newcomer's point of view, We're 
even going to go back and reprint some 
reviews from the last 30 years of 73. Since 
so many newcomers buy their first rig at a 
flea market, we figured it would make 
sense to publish reviews of this older gear. 

The special premier issue of Radio Fun 
snouid be at your local ham store in a few 
weeks it's a Dig, tabloid-sized newspaper, 
so you can't miss it. We'll also be sending 
them to as many hamfests and flea mar- 
kets as we can. If you're a recent Novice or 
Technician, you just might gel a free copy 
in the mail. 

ft you want to guarantee your copy of the 
premier issue, you have to subscribe BE- 
FORE It is released. We're only printing a 
limited number, and when they're sold 
out. . .that's it. Check out the subscription 
ad in this issue of 73. The charter sub- 
scription rale is only $9 97 for 12 issues. 
To sweeten the deal, we're col lee I tog sav- 
ings coupons from several advertisers. 
Everyone who subscribes at this pre-pub- 
lication rate will receive at least S25 worth 
of coupons for aJI kinds of great products, 
including "buck-off coupons for Uncle 
Wayne' s Bookshelf. So you realty can't tose. 

Evetyone at 73is very excited about this 
new project, and we've received support 
from the biggest and best companies in 
the amaieur radio industry Now. all we 
need are readers. 1 hope you'll be one of 
them. After all . couldn't we all use a lit- 
tle more fun? 




Number 33 on your Feedback card 



ROPA GA TION 



Jim Gray WlXU 
2W Chateau Circfe 
PaysonAZ 85541 

A Mixed Bag 

May is one of those months that lies 
between the excellent propagation of 
the spring equinox and the poorer MF 
DX of the summer solstice, and there- 
fore exhibits both good and poor DX 
conditions. Usually, the better condi- 
tions exist closer to the first of the 
month, and the poorer conditions to- 
ward the end , but "usual 1 * 
doesn't always mean this 
month and this year! 

For example, just a few 
months ago, most propaga- 
tion analysts were surprised 
by the 'plateau'* in sun spot 
numbers accompanied by a 
reduction of solar flux that 
lasted nearly six months. No 
one could safely predict what 
would happen. . .and Old 
Sol fooled us again, as just 
two weeks ago. he showed a 
solar flux well over 300, one 
of the highest in this cycle. 
Does this mean, then, that 
we may have a double peak, 
or what? No one knows. The- 
oretically. we should be starl- 
ing on Hie down side of Cycle 
22. And perhaps we are; but 
Old Sot may have a lew sur- 
prises in store yet. 

Specifically, for May, you 
can expect a possible few 
"Poor Tr {see the calendar) 
propagation days centered 
around the 7th or 0th > and 
again around the 16th. The 
last week or so is expected to 
be only "Fair" to 'Poor." 
The "Good" days are antici- 
pated between ihe 1st and 
the 5th. the 10th to 14th. and 
the 1 9th to the 22nd of May, 

Keep your ears and receiv- 
ers lunetf to WWV for late 
predictions and recent 
changes in the flux levels so 



Jim Gray WlXU 

that you can take advantage of condi- 
tions as they occur. The id-minute. 
^fteMhe-hour broadcasts at 5, 10, or 
15 MHz are the ones I use; most fre- 
quently, the one on 10 MHz. Remem- 
ber that you want a LOW J, A ,r index 
(below 10), and a high solar flux index 
(above 180). This is not to say that 
higher magnetic field indexes and low- 
er solar flux numbers render the bands 
unusable; it just means that (hey won 1 ! 
be as good for DX propagation. See 
you next month? 



EASTER 




















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88 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



We're not kidding. Superior engineering and durable con- 
struction comes standard on the FT-2400 and all Yaesu trans- 
ceivers. Thai's why Yaesu is the official radio for the Nissan off- 
road race team. The FT-2400 is also the first radio ever to be 
submitted for the grueling MIL STD SIOD rating* 

^^jVX Built to take the abuse of highway 

^jxjNiNp^^ n. and off -road use, the FT-2400 is 

\V \. packed with exceptional 

x\\\\V ^ _ \ features including 26 full- 

function memory channels. 
The FT-2400 also allows you 
to identify channels with 
your choice of frequencies or 
alpha numeric readout. A new DTMF 
microphone with easy to see backlit keypad and a modular plug 
is included. And for effortless reading day or night a huge LCD 
display features big numbers and an automatic level dimmer 

control. 

What's more, the engineers at 
Yaesu have added a practical ■- 
feature, once you have pro* 
grarnmed the FT-2400 just flip 
up the panel to keep those sel- 
dom used buttons out of the ^ ^ * 1 
way, no more having to reset 
your mobile or accidentally 
pushing the wrong button. 



n c n 



AQO 



Features: 
• VHF Hi-power mobile three 
selectable power levels 50w 
high, 25w mid, 5w low • 
Wide band receiver coverage 
140-174 Rx, 140-150 Tx * 
CTCSS encode built-in 
selectable from front panel ■ 
5 scanning functions; Band 
scan. Memory scan, Memory channel lock-out with selectable 
scan stops and priority scan * Channel steps: 5, 10, 12.5, 15, 
20, 25 and 50 • One piece die-cast flame construction body 

and heat sink • Automatic 

repeater offset • Pro- 
grammable call channel ' 

Options: L»u 

• DTMF calling and pager 
option (requires FRC-6 | 
paging unit) ■ CTCSS 
decode unit (FTS-I7A) ■ 
External speaker (SP-7) * 
Heavy duty microphone 
< MH-25A8J) • Power sup- 
ply CFP-700) 

If you need a mobile that's ready for anything, you can't beat 
the FT-2400. Contact your nearest Yaesu dealer. 




1 — n O' / ci 



* « TIUflSCfJvriT FT-2400 



VOL 



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^ 









1 r-;n Iczn 



F/V^f 



Lftty fc 



LOCK 



> > 




'Approval Pending 



199(3 Yaesu USA. 172J0 Eciwarcs Roaa Cemtos CA 90701 
Specifications subr&ct to change wilhoul nottce 
Performance WithOUt COtnpWmtSe. Specifications guaranteed aniy wrfhrn amateur bar 









SSSfi 






jff5 


uBBB 


RjH 





• 



No competition class transceiver 

is even in the same ballpark as the 
TS-850S. 

You'll find a superior intermod- 
ulation dynamic range of 108 dB 
throughout the entire 100 kHz to 
30 MHz range. 

Kenwood's optional DSP- 100 
Digital Signal Processor (DSP) 
converts audio signals to digital 
information, where it is shaped 
and processed by a micropro- 
cessor. For SSB work, this means 
a cleaner signal, and for CW P it 
allows adjustment of the rise and 
fall times for optimum waveshape. 
The DSP- 100 also works at the 



receiver detector level for audio 
shaping, in all modes. 

Other advanced technology in 
the TS-850S includes 10 Hz step 
dual VFOs, multi-mode scanning, 
full and semi break-in CW, superior 
interference reduction, keyer t dual 
noise blanker, and RIT/XIT. 100 
memory channels store, transmit, 
and receive frequencies indepen- 
dently High boost for SSB signal 
"punch? Microphone supplied. 

The Kenwood T5-850S. All 
band. All mode. One year warranty. 
In a class by itself! 

Key options. 

DSP- 100 Digital Signal Processor. 



AT- 3 00 160 -10 m external antenna tune 
AT-850 160-10 m internal antenna tune* 
DRU-2 Internal digital recording unit. 
IF-232C Computer interface. PG-2X 
DC cable. PS- 52 Power supply SO-2 
TCXO. SP-31 Matching external speaker. 
VS-2 Voice synthesizer. YG-455C-1 500 
Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF YG-455CN- 
250 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF. YK-88C-; 
500 Hz C W filter for 8.83 MHz IF. 
YK-B8CN-1 270 Hz CW filter for 8,83 
MHz IE YK-88SN- 1 1.8 kHz SSB filter for 
8.83 MHz IF. 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS & TEST EQUIPMENT GROU 
RO. BOX 22745, 2201 E. Dominguez Street 
Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 
KENWO00 ELECTRONICS CANADA INC, 
RO. BOX 1075 t 959 Gana Court 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T4C2 






OlQlT*L STOMAL 



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accessories. Specifications are subject to change without notice. Compiem service manuals are available tor at 
KsnwoQd Transceivers anrfmQSt accessories *One year wBJTarrty in toe U. S.A onty 



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